demodex mites and how to cure them on...

demodex mites and how to cure them on eyelids

Posted in the Scabies Forum

First Prev
of 17
Next Last
Bitey

Portland, OR

#1 Feb 13, 2010
I have been fighting scabies too but I had eyelid mites and cured them using the research from the internet.

Have you ever had itchy dry eyelids? Feel like something is in your eyes?

I have had this for a year or more and Drs and Ophthemologists do not know what it is and cannot cure it for me.

So I went online and Googled the problem. Also I got a handheld microscope and looked at what looked like TINY WHITE EGGS in my lashes and some other wierd junk.

I diagnosed myself as having an overabundance of Demodex Mites in my eyelashes, after breast cancer chemo treatments in 2005, my body has not been the same and i probably got this due to my immune system problems after chemo.

What I found online is a Tea Tree cure:

1. Get some tea oil and mix it with macadamia oil so the tea tree oil is 20%.

2. Get tea tree liquid soap and tea tree shampoo.

3, Every day shower and wash your hair with tea tree shamppoo and close eyes and wash eyelids and eyelashes with the tea tree shampoo and tea tree liquid soap. This is the first step, you should try and gently clean your eyelids and lash area for about 4 minutes if you can. Keep those eyes closed.

4. Once or twice a week, in addition to the tea tree showering, clse your eyes tightly and get q-tips and rub the 20% tea tree solution in your lash area and on the eyelids. For about 5 minutes, the research scientist does it agressively on his subjects for 10 minutes but that was too long for me.

5. After a week my eye problems were gone. I think it would work if you had scabies mites in or near your eyelids also, I would try it!

6.I view my eyelids and lashes each week with the microscope and so far so good! No more little white eggs on eyelashes.

Thank you all for these Scabies boards, i have learned a lot and used a lot of the information to hopefully cure my scabies!!!!
Pokadot Patty

United States

#2 Feb 13, 2010
Bitey wrote:
I have been fighting scabies too but I had eyelid mites and cured them using the research from the internet.
Have you ever had itchy dry eyelids? Feel like something is in your eyes?
I have had this for a year or more and Drs and Ophthemologists do not know what it is and cannot cure it for me.
So I went online and Googled the problem. Also I got a handheld microscope and looked at what looked like TINY WHITE EGGS in my lashes and some other wierd junk.
I diagnosed myself as having an overabundance of Demodex Mites in my eyelashes, after breast cancer chemo treatments in 2005, my body has not been the same and i probably got this due to my immune system problems after chemo.
What I found online is a Tea Tree cure:
1. Get some tea oil and mix it with macadamia oil so the tea tree oil is 20%.
2. Get tea tree liquid soap and tea tree shampoo.
3, Every day shower and wash your hair with tea tree shamppoo and close eyes and wash eyelids and eyelashes with the tea tree shampoo and tea tree liquid soap. This is the first step, you should try and gently clean your eyelids and lash area for about 4 minutes if you can. Keep those eyes closed.
4. Once or twice a week, in addition to the tea tree showering, clse your eyes tightly and get q-tips and rub the 20% tea tree solution in your lash area and on the eyelids. For about 5 minutes, the research scientist does it agressively on his subjects for 10 minutes but that was too long for me.
5. After a week my eye problems were gone. I think it would work if you had scabies mites in or near your eyelids also, I would try it!
6.I view my eyelids and lashes each week with the microscope and so far so good! No more little white eggs on eyelashes.
Thank you all for these Scabies boards, i have learned a lot and used a lot of the information to hopefully cure my scabies!!!!
Bitey,
This is really excellent info !!
Thanks for the post.
Patty
Pokadot Patty

United States

#3 Feb 14, 2010
This can ,also, cause swollen eyelids.
Patty
Sig Olson

Mankato, MN

#4 Apr 23, 2010
I also went through 6 months of chemo after a radical mastectomy late 2003-spring 2004. Tumor was on chest wall and quite large. Have known I've had eyelid problem 3+ years. Dermatologist RX'd ketoconazole shampoo and metrogel. Helps... Head is biggest problem but think they're everywhere. Have used products listed here but maybe not aggressively enough. I'll use Bitey's instructions and will follow this site.

Thanks for great info. In all my searching I've found a lot of nearly desperate sufferers. I found this site googling: demodex and cancer.
buggie

United States

#5 Apr 24, 2010
Wow sig,
Very interesting...the link between chemo and mites.
Also, seems like another product would work. Tea tree oil takes 3 minutes to kill mites. So close to eyes.
For instance: Pomado de azufre in small amounts kept on eyelids...

I'm glad I stayed away from my friend who later died of cancer. I was very infested and I didn't want to add to her serious health problems. Although in our last phone call I gave her air cyber hugs because I wouldn't and couldn't hug her in person, and she said, "I would hug you." By then the only thing that mattered to her was love.
Sig Olson

Mankato, MN

#6 Apr 27, 2010
Will try again. Tried last night 2 times and wouldn't go.
Don't know that chemo and mites are direct link; other than those going through it are in a dilapidated condition and more likely to pick up anything or increase anything.

Am having some good success with using 95% vinegar, 5% bleach solution (wipe on with cloth head to toe) on entire body. Skin looks and feels much better--BUT this combination makes very dangerous fumes.

Thanks for your comments "buggie". Will add more later.
Advise01

Amstenrade, Netherlands

#7 Apr 27, 2010
MDFPR Noon Conference * Friday, June 2, 2006
Daniel K. Onion, MD
Bugs, Bumps, Boils and BooBoos
LICE XE "Lice, body/head"
Cause: Phthirus pubis XE "Phthirus pubis" XE "Crabs" ; Pediculus corporis XE "Pediculus corporis/capitis" (body lice), P. capitis (head lice)
Epidem: P. pubis, venereal; P. corporis and P. capitis, via bedding, clothing, and other fomites
Life cycle: 25 d egg‑to‑egg . Live exclusively on human blood, can't live >24 h without it. Only ~10 adults/pt
Pathophys: Attach to hair; itch and rashes due to bites and allergies to louse and its feces
Sx: Pruritus with all; P. pubis localized to axillary, perianal, pubic areas, and occasionally in eyelashes (blepharitis XE "Blepharitis from lice" )
Si: Lice and nits (egg sacks on hairs) evident w magnifying glass or careful inspection; bites
Crs:
Cmplc: r/o bird lice (eg, from pigeons on air conditioner)
Lab:
Rx:(Med Let 1997;38:6)
Launder clothes, bedding; hang them outside x 24 h will also kill since can't survive >24 h away from body
Meds: rx as below, perhaps repeat x 1 at 7d
1st:•permethrin 1%(Nix); $9/2 oz; 95% cure with one rx at 14 d (Am J Pub Hlth 1988;78:978), but resistance appearing
2nd:•permethrin 5%(Elimite) over night, 1st choice for pubic lice (Med Let 1999;41:89), avoid for head lice in children; or
•malathion 0.5%(Ovide)(Med Let 1999;41:73) lotion x 8-12 hr, then repeat in 1 wk
•pyrethrins + piperonyl butoxide (Rid, Vonce, A‑200, Pronto); 65% cure after 1 rx at 14 d (Am J Pub Hlth 1988;78:978); $5/2 oz
3rd:•lindane shampoos (1% gamma benzene hexachloride, Kwell), x 1 usually enough; may need x 3 q 4 d; $5/2 oz, or
•ivermectin (Mectizan) 200 µgm/kg po x1
4th:• Tm/S po bid x 10 d w permethrin topically (Peds 2001;107:575) improved cure from 80% to 95%
of eye cmplc: 1/4% eserine ophthalmic ointment to lids with cotton tip applicator
of school outbreaks, full guidelines (Maine Epigram 10/86); "nit free policies unrealistic"
COMMON AND NORWEGIAN SCABIES XE "Scabies, common/Norwegian"
Ann IM 1983;98:498; Nejm 1978;298:496
Cause: Sarcoptes scabiei XE "Sarcoptes scabiei" var. hominis: an arthropod mite
Epidem: Norwegian rare in US except in AIDS pts and alcoholics
Pathophys: Common: burrows in skin, leading to allergic reaction
Norwegian: no burrowing, but hides beneath skin scales
Sx: Common: itching, worst at night
Norwegian: no itching
Si: Common: red papules in intertriginous areas
Norwegian: hyperkeratotic skin hiding mites
Crs: Common: even w rx takes 2 wk for sx to subside
Cmplc:
Lab: Bact: Mineral oil scraping of burrow shows mite or eggs under low power
Rx:(Med Let 1993;35:111)
Launder clothes, bedding; hang them outside x 24 h will also kill since can't survive >24 h away from body
Meds:
1st, permethrin 5%(Elimite) cream (Med Let 1999;41:89) x 8‑12 h; 30 gm enough to rx adult; 91% cure; safer than lindane
2nd, lindane 1%(Kwell)(Med Let 1997;39:6) once though often may need repeat; 86% cure; crotamiton 10%(Eurax) if above fails; 60% cure
Experimental: ivermectin 200 µgm/kg po x 1, ii 6mg tabs for avg adult; very effective, esp. w crusting type and/or in immunosuppressed (Nejm 1995;333:26)
BITE WOUND XE "Bite wound infections" INFECTIONS
Nejm 2004;350:904; 1999;340:85, 138
Cause: Anaerobes, Pasteurella multocida and canis, viridans strep, staph, Moraxella, and Neisseria XE "Pasteurella multocida"
Epidem: P. multocida is the organism in >50% animal bite wound infections especially from cats, can also induce infections in scratches
Pathophys:
Sx:
Si: Cellulitis
Crs: 70% develop within 1 d, 90% in 2 d, 100% in 3 d
Cmplc:
Lab:
Rx: dT shot if indicated
Prophylactic antibiotics reasonable if deep punctures (esp from cats), hand wounds, or surgical repair needed, w:
1st augmentin (amoxicillin and clavulinic acid) po, or Unasyn (amp + sulbactam) iv; or
2nd for human bites: penicillin + cephalosporine
for animal bites: moxifloxacin + clindamycin
STAPH TISSUE INFECTIONS
Nejm 1998;338:520
Cause: Staphylococcus aureus XE "Stap
Advise02

Amstenrade, Netherlands

#9 Apr 27, 2010
STREPTOCOCCAL ERYSIPELAS, CELLULITIS/WOUND INFECTIONS, NECROTIZING FASCIITIS, AND IMPETIGO (Nejm 2004;350:904 [cellulitis];1996;334:240)
Cause: Streptococcus pyogenes, group A, β‑hemolytic
Epidem: Erysipelas XE "Erysipelas" and cellulitis XE "Cellulitis, streptococcal" , common; necrotizing fasciitis ( XE "Necrotizing fasciitis" XE "Fasciitis, necrotizing" NF), rare, 1/yr in big hospital. Invasive strep infections in 1.5/100 000/yr in general population, 3/1000 of household contacts (Nejm 1996;335:547); but invasive cases are just the tip of the iceberg since same strain will be found causing much more pharyngitis in the community (Jama 1997;277:38)
Pathophys: Erysipelas is mainly in lymphatics
Cellulitis, in subcutaneous tissues
NF, infections dissect along fascial planes, so skin is last to go, and look deceptively benign; 1/3 of the time NF is associated with anaerobic bacteria as well
Impetigo is a superficial skin infection, starts in a break in the skin
Sx: Pain, fever, and rapid spreading in erysipelas, cellulitis, and NF; in impetigo, sx are of a weeping rash usually in a child
Si: Erysipelas has sharp limits, symmetric swelling, usually across bridge of nose
Cellulitis has little edema and indistinct limits; may be perianal in children
NF has edema, fever, redness, gas crepitation (in 50%), anesthesia (nerve infarction), ecchymosis (thrombosis)
In impetigo, rash has bullae with honey yellow exudate
Crs: In NF, 75% die without surgical debridement within 1‑2 d
Cmplc: Toxic shock syndrome (p PAGEREF ToxicShock Error! Bookmark not defined.) and acute glomerular nephritis can occur with all
Erysipelas: r/o XE "Erysipeloid" ERYSIPELOID (hands, exposure to raw meat and animals, slower spread; gram‑positive rod, culture skin biopsy; rx with penicillin etc.)
Cellulitis: erythema nodosum and endocarditis, r/o acute axillary lymphadenitis (Nejm 1990;323:655), vibrio salt water infections, pasturella from animal bites, pseudomonas in diabetic feet, mouth anaerobes from human bites, aeromonas cellulitis XE "aeromonas cellulitis" from leeches or fresh water abrasions rx’d w cipro or imipenenem/cilastin.
NF: r/o gas gangrene
Lab: Bact: In all, culture, and gram‑positive cocci in chains on Gram stain
Path: For NF, frozen section biopsy
Serol: ASO titers elevated
Rx: Prevention w bacitracin dressing no better than vaseline (Jama 1996;276:972)
for all, antibiotics like penicillin, erythromycin although 20‑40% resistance now in Finland (Nejm 1992;326:292)
of impetigo, mupirocin (Bactroban) ointment (not cream)topically tid as good as po antibiotics; $10/15‑gm tube (Med Let 1988;30:55); debated if need to cover for resistant staph, especially nonbullous type (Lancet 1991;338:803)
of NF, extensive surgical debridement first; clindamycin helps decr toxin production
Final Advise

Amstenrade, Netherlands

#10 Apr 27, 2010
Read:

....of eye cmplc: 1/4% eserine ophthalmic ointment to lids with cotton tip applicator of school outbreaks, full guidelines (Maine Epigram 10/86); "nit free policies unrealistic"

Eserine is a highly toxic molecule, much like super lethal snake poison.
Poison is everywhere, so that is also probably not the problem.

However, maybe better use the BLEACH BATH treatment.

What you quite likely suffer is the COLONIZATION with Staphylococcus Aureus.

This is often considered a SECONDARY INFECTION.

The eyes are often colonized (crawling)

You may end up a little red eyed, take care with the chlorine.
Alternatively you can try the public swimming pool as well as mupirocine(bactroban) and Fucidin eye cream.

The chlorines are most effective.
http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/719330...

Read the Post: Bleach Baths, on this site.

Cheers!
Eserine

Amstenrade, Netherlands

#11 Apr 27, 2010
Eserine (Old lice treatment)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Physostigmine
Eserine02

Amstenrade, Netherlands

#12 Apr 27, 2010
Example:

The Wills Eye Hospital atlas of clinical ophthalmology
http://books.google.nl/books...

Anticholinesterase and pediculicidal activities of monoterpenoids
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science...

Inhibition of destruction: anticholinesterase agents
http://www.pharmacorama.com/en/Sections/Acety...

Since: Apr 10

Location hidden

#13 Apr 27, 2010
Advise 01 & Eserine/02 Thank You!!!!!!

Maybe now U.S. will be more open with information. Let's hope.
Eserine03

Amstenrade, Netherlands

#14 Apr 27, 2010
Quite likely scabies or lice is not your problem, why not try the bleach bath protocol.

Colonization with Staphylococcus Aureus is much more likely for most affected individuals.

Germany (any country in EU can order online) has a soap called Octenisan wash lotion. Will cost you Euro 6 per liter. But it will not take the colonization out.

What substance is with the potential to take a COLONIZATION out?
Try to wash for 5 to 30 day's with a household bleach suspension.
(Sodium Hypochlorite)

Add one cup bleach per bath per day.
Combine with mupirocin (bactroban) Nasal cream.
Or visit every day a public swimming pool for minimal 30 minutes.

Chance is 99% that all your problems will resolve.

The infection with staphylococcus aureus causes "bites" to occur.
Scalp, wrists, feet and sturdy skin will be most affected.
Eyes are a magnet, the ears, the groin.

The agent seems to be lipophilic (grease loving)
You will have crawling feelings as soon as the bacterial load goes up.

You may have picked it up in the hospital (nosocomial infection)
However, fact is that the epidemic spread since 2000 went all over the US and Europe, and so on...

They (the scientist) have decided not to treat, but to let the epidemic burn out.

Read: burn in!

MRSA

EU 25000 dead, US 19000

The difference sits in the genetic make up of the strain.

You are probably with a strain that has a low virulence, but one that is virulent enough to drive you mad.

And no, the medics will refuse to diagnose you, like anybody else.

Demand from your medic to see the COLONIZATION with staphylococcus excluded.

For sure; consider to follow the Bleach Bath protocol.

Cheers!
Sig Olson

Mankato, MN

#15 Apr 27, 2010
Eserine 03, Everything you say makes perfect sense. I hope this stays posted a while as I haven't figured out how to print it yet. I will make notes. Yes, I feel bites and strong itch anywhere, then subsides. Eyes biggest problem and yes, crawling sensation on face. I do feel much much better with dermatology RXs and my vinegar/bleach "treatments". Can't begin to thank you enough and I hope others will find this.
Sig Olson

Mankato, MN

#16 Apr 27, 2010
Will do bleach baths and try to get my hands on bactroban nasal cream. Calling pharmacy.......

Hugs to You!!!
Eserine04

Amstenrade, Netherlands

#17 Apr 27, 2010
http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/719330 ...
March 26, 2010 (Atlanta, Georgia)— Nasal application of 2% mupirocin and bleach baths were found to be more effective at eradicating Staphylococcus aureus colonization than other interventions, according to the findings of a randomized trial.
Bernard C. Camins, MD, from the Division of Infectious Diseases at the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Missouri, reported the findings here at the Fifth Decennial International Conference on Healthcare-Associated Infections 2010.
According to the researchers, a variety of strategies have been used to decolonize patients with varying results, and there are "no published data on controlled trials evaluating the optimal methods for decolonization and their efficacy in preventing recurrent S aureus infections."
Dr. Camins and colleagues evaluated the effectiveness of decolonization methods in the eradication of S aureus carriage in 193 children and 107 adults presenting with community-acquired S aureus skin and soft tissue infections.
In addition to education on personal hygiene, all eligible patients were randomize to 1 of 4 groups: no intervention (control); application of 2% mupirocin ointment to both anterior nares twice daily for 5 days; application of 2% mupirocin ointment intranasally plus daily showers with 4% chlorhexidine solution for 5 days; and application of 2% mupirocin ointment intranasally plus daily 30-minute soaks in dilute bleach water for 5 days.
Of the patients, 68% were colonized with methicillin-resistant S aureus (MRSA) and 32% were colonized with methicillin-sensitive S aureus alone. All interventions were effective 1 month postintervention at eradicating S aureus carriage, compared with the control group.
Eserine05

Amstenrade, Netherlands

#18 Apr 27, 2010
At 4 months postintervention, only the mupirocin plus bleach bath was found to be effective at eradicating S aureus colonization (69% vs 48%; relative risk, 1.26; 95% confidence interval, 1.05 - 2.01; P =.02). All treatment groups were well tolerated, with dry skin being the most common adverse effect.
"This current study is a pilot feasibility study for a larger trial to determine whether decolonization would prevent future episodes of skin and soft tissue infection," Dr. Camins told Medscape Infectious Diseases.
"Before we completed the trial, decolonization methods were being used clinically without any scientific data supporting their use," he said. "Now that we have completed our trial, at least clinicians can feel comfortable recommending the intranasal application of mupirocin plus bleach baths in patients with recurrent community-acquired MRSA skin/soft tissue infections," he said.
Dr. Camins added that they were surprised that the mupirocin plus chlorhexidine intervention did not lead to decolonization, compared with the control group, at 4 months.
According to Keith M. Ramsey, MD, from the Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University in Greenville, North Carolina, who attended the meeting, the addition of the diluted 30-minute bleach bath to nasal mupirocintreatments, resulting in two thirds of the S aureus carriers remaining free of carriage for up to 4 months, is a new finding, and should be explored in larger studies.
Dr. Ramsey told Medscape infectious Diseases that "it would be interesting to follow the subjects in the treatment arms to determine if any of the decolonization regimens result in differences in subsequent or recurrent clinical disease with S aureus or MRSA."
This study was supported by an unrestricted grant from Pfizer. Chlorhexidine solution was provided by Mölnlycke Health Care. Taro Pharmaceuticals contributed generic mupirocin ointment. Dr. Camins reports being a consultant for Pfizer. Dr. Ramsey reports being a consultant for BD GeneOhm and on the speakers' bureau for MedImmune, Cubist, and OrthoMcNeil.
Fifth Decennial International Conference on Healthcare-Associated Infections (ICHAI) 2010: Abstract 502. Presented March 20, 2010.
Eserine06

Amstenrade, Netherlands

#19 Apr 27, 2010
Pretty sure you fight Staphylococcus Aureus and not scabies or lice.
The agent will polymerize in and on skin (will form a biofilm)

Only sodium hypochlorite seems with the potential to penetrate and break down the protective barrier (March 26, 2010)

A public swimming pool often will contain chlorine dioxide, this is actually an explosive gas. The gas must be prepared on location, because it may not be transported.

Chlorine dioxide is with the potential to penetrate spores.
It was used to decontaminate anthrax contaminated building.
The foot bath usually contains a much higher percentage.
It is very safe.

Why not combine both treatments.

Also go high on antioxidants:

1000 mg vitamin C
1000 mg curcuma
450 mg green tea

Black chocolate
Cherry sirup
Blueberries

Cheers!
Sig Olson

Mankato, MN

#20 Apr 27, 2010
I just wrote a post but don't know where it is--not here. Have been using most of the antioxidants you suggest. Will add the green tea and increase the others. Celery has been of help and grapefruit; consuming all parts.

I'm very grateful for your help. No response is necessary.

Since: Apr 10

Location hidden

#21 Apr 30, 2010
Using all/most of the above. Just got Mupirocin. Improvement!! Expecting steady improvement by continued above advise.

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker
First Prev
of 17
Next Last

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Scabies Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
I don't think it's scabies 12 hr petslug 13
Completely Cured (May '10) 12 hr petslug 61
Mites I think I need help with idenfying what i... 19 hr marvinmo 2
Borax vs DIATOMACEOUS EARTH (Dec '10) Sat Jfizer 24
My wonderful life with mites Sat Aas 2
where does YOUR scabies come from? (Feb '09) Sat Susie 92
going crazy with scabies (Jan '07) Fri Tom 87
More from around the web