prostate psa test: Experts study whet...

prostate psa test: Experts study whether prostate psa test help...

There are 18 comments on the Chicago Tribune story from Mar 18, 2009, titled prostate psa test: Experts study whether prostate psa test help.... In it, Chicago Tribune reports that:

There is now a partial answer to one of the most controversial questions in medicine: whether men should get blood tests that screen for prostate cancer.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Chicago Tribune.

don

Evanston, IL

#1 Mar 18, 2009
My annual blood sample is screened for more than PSA. I would guess that very few, if any annual blood samples are screened for only one potential health hazard so I would argue that annual blood screenings should be continued.
Patrick

United States

#2 Mar 18, 2009
Dan Fogelberg passed away at 57 from prostate cancer. That really freaked me out.. and was the reason I got tested. Glad to say it was negative. I wish Dan would have had his detected in time. We lost a great artist when he passed.
Montys python

Henderson, NV

#3 Mar 18, 2009
As a member of the group which had prostate cancer treated early,I can say I am at peace with my decision.It all boils down to an informed decision by the patient as to have treatment or not.Last night TV news stated the 85 and older population was the fastest growing segement of the US populationA man in his mid 60's can probably look forward to living an additional 20 yrears,30 for men in their mid 50's.What it boils down to is the quality of life for the last few years of life.A cancer patient whose cancer was not treated decades earlier I don't think is going to be enjoying the benefits of living longer.Have the PSA test,and if it comes back positive,then discuss the options with your provider,but don't do away with the test.The decision lies with the patient.
ImJustSaying

Tinley Park, IL

#4 Mar 18, 2009
I'm 51 and have recently completed a new type of radiation treatment for prostate cancer. Three doctors I spoke with told me that at my age, it's better to know about it and do something about it becase I could reasonably be expected to live another 30 years. I was fully informed of the possible side effects and chose to have the treatment. I haven't yet had another PSA test, but the side effects have been tolerable and are slowly becoming less of an issue. I believe that if I had chosen to not be tested, or not have treatment because the tumor is slow-growing, that I would have had a much bigger problem to deal with years from now. It's always better to have the information so you can decide for yourself what you want to do about it.
Arizona Now

Mesa, AZ

#5 Mar 18, 2009
My father died of prostate cancer, well before PSA tests were used. I was diagnosed with prostate cancer at age 64 thanks to the PSA test. That's three years ago and cancer was contained in the prostate and removed in surgery. Now let's see, think I'm in favor of skipping the testing? NO! Test, test, test. And who is to say that a man who is 75 has less than 10 years left?
Keep My PSA

Sterling Heights, MI

#6 Mar 18, 2009
I know and have heard of too many men who have died of prostate cancer at young ages (50's and 60's), because they weren't screened. The very disturbing side effect of non-treatment (death) seems to me to be much worse than the "frequent" (but not always) "especially disturbing side effects" of treatment. I know many men who are glad to be alive today, side effects and all.

What are these people thinking?
Edward Virtually

Bronx, NY

#7 Mar 18, 2009
one wonders just how many men were needless castrated, physically or chemically, to treat something that was "slow growing and almost surely not dangerous".
What ever

Chicago, IL

#8 Mar 18, 2009
Well I don't think that getting a test done will hurt anyone. It's what happens afterwards that is the concern. So many people have died early because of prostrate cancer. Get the test and talk to the DR about what treatments if any you need to do. Then go and talk to another DR and find out what they think. Why wait for a treatable cancer to be non treatable?
WatchPuppy

Richmond, TX

#9 Mar 18, 2009
I started getting PSA tests when I was in my early 40s and the tests were always borderline high, in the 3.8 to 4.2 range. The PSA level increased to 7.0 and 9.3 in two successive tests six months apart when I was 65. A biopsy revealed prostate cancer and I considered various options: "watchful waiting", radioactive seeds, surgery, robotic surgery. I've always been active and healthy and spend a lot of time with my grandchildren. I opted to have my urologist perform a radical prostatectomy; the pathology report after the surgery showed that the cancer was contained to the prostate and had not spread. I think that fear of the unknown ("what if the cancer spreads"; "how much longer will I live if I don't treat the cancer"; "what will be my quality of life with or without the surgery") and the advice of family friends who are physicians had me choose the surgery. My recovery has been uneventful: sexual function has returned but I still have occasional "leakage" during stressful activities. Would I have had a different decision if this study and article had been published two years ago before my surgery? No.
Lyda Jackson

Chicago, IL

#10 Mar 18, 2009
My husband was diagnosed with prostate cancer at the age of 51. This was 12 years ago. PSA blood had recently been instituted. Since my husband, who being African American, fell into a high risk category, he insisted that his doctor do the test. His PSA level was just ever so slightly elevated. A biopsy revealed a moderately aggressive form of prostate cancer. He had surgery to remove his prostate and has had no sign of reoccurence. He is a healthy, active 63 year old. When he was diagnosed, we had a 5-year-old son. So I am all for routine testing. It saved my husband's life. Mind you, he had NO SYMPTOMS.
Kevin

Chicago, IL

#11 Mar 18, 2009
I just had my 3rd prostate biopsy after my PSA went up to 4.2 from a 3.2. My dad has a seed for his prostate and I'm African American. If it were not for the PSA, I wouldn't know nor would my dad have known he had some prostate cancer. All that's done is take a blood sample. That's the least of any man's worries. So you men over 40, go get tested!!
Quintus

Germany

#13 Mar 18, 2009
How dare you question them!

People on TV say we have to do this - people with impressive initials after their names!

If we don't obey, we'll have no one to blame!

Since: Dec 08

Chicago, IL

#14 Mar 18, 2009
While many prostate cancers are slow growing, many more are not. Not sure how referenced studies screened for this, but sense that when "early diagnosis" is made most men would elect to remove. As for excessive biopsies from false positive PSA, there is a more specific "free to total" PSA which could could and should reduce number of biopsies. In 2008 there was roughly same number of new cases of both prostate cancer 186,000 and breast cancer 182,000 diagnosed with roughly 28,000 deaths from prostate cancer and 40,000 from breast cancer. While would agree that breast cancer is horrific disease, no one is advocating a decrease in screening for this despite the fact the fact that morbidity and mortality of these largely gender exclusive diseases (some men do get breast cancer) are similar. Metastatic prostate cancer is a horrible way to die and appropriate screening should be offered to those at risk.
KAG

Grayslake, IL

#15 Mar 18, 2009
Famous musical performers Frank Zappa (52) and Dan Fogelberg (56) died at a younger age from prostrate cancer. Would early screening have helped them, and thousands of others hit by this disease?
Jarrett

United States

#16 Mar 18, 2009
This article is really damaging if it causes even one man to forego the PSA test. The PSA test is usually given in conjunction with other blood tests using the same samples so there is no reason NOT to have it done. There are several approaches to treating prostate cancer if detected early. And who is to say that a 75-year-old has only a 10-year life expectancy? I'm 75 and all of my uncles have lived well into their 90s. Good thing no one told them 20 years ago that they had only 10 years to go.
Montys python

Henderson, NV

#18 Mar 19, 2009
KAG wrote:
Famous musical performers Frank Zappa (52) and Dan Fogelberg (56) died at a younger age from prostrate cancer. Would early screening have helped them, and thousands of others hit by this disease?
You can add Tiger Woods dad to the list also.
Soylent_Green

United States

#19 Mar 19, 2009
Patrick wrote:
Dan Fogelberg passed away at 57 from prostate cancer. That really freaked me out.. and was the reason I got tested. Glad to say it was negative. I wish Dan would have had his detected in time. We lost a great artist when he passed.
Frank Zappa died even younger from same.
Michael

United States

#20 Sep 4, 2009
ImJustSaying wrote:
I'm 51 and have recently completed a new type of radiation treatment for prostate cancer. Three doctors I spoke with told me that at my age, it's better to know about it and do something about it becase I could reasonably be expected to live another 30 years. I was fully informed of the possible side effects and chose to have the treatment. I haven't yet had another PSA test, but the side effects have been tolerable and are slowly becoming less of an issue. I believe that if I had chosen to not be tested, or not have treatment because the tumor is slow-growing, that I would have had a much bigger problem to deal with years from now. It's always better to have the information so you can decide for yourself what you want to do about it.
WHat type of treat did you get exactly? I'm 53 and was just diagnosed with prostrate cancer.

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Prostate Cancer Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
News What is a urologist? What do urologists do? (Dec '14) 3 hr thenose 3
Prostate cancer spread to tumour in spine Jun 24 Another PC Patient 2
Plasma button surgery for BPH (Dec '11) Jun 23 jayp 194
GreenLight Laser Surgery Complications (May '07) Jun 20 Depressed NYer 1,431
Green Light Laser surgery for BPH prostate (Feb '12) Jun 8 David stern 39
News "Virax Holdings Limited (PTX) - Pharmaceuticals... May '15 St_Nick 2
News The 10 commandments of cancer prevention (May '09) May '15 usherhollens 17
More from around the web