Understanding whiplash injuries

Understanding whiplash injuries

Posted in the Pain Forum

Since: Jan 13

Casablanca, Morocco

#1 Jan 29, 2013
Whiplash is a common injury that can be experienced following a motor vehicle collision (MVC). There are more than 100,000 whiplash cases in Canada each year. The unique forces generated during these collisions can stress biological tissues and result in pain, decreased functioning and disability for those affected. This article provides a review of the current scientific understanding of whiplash associated symptoms, along with guidelines on assessment and best management strategies.
Although rear-end collisions are the most commonly reported mechanism of whiplash injury, an injury may also occur following side and head-on collisions. The forces generated from these types of impacts thrust the head (and to a lesser extent the entire body) back and forth, much like a snapping whip. Injury results because the body is unable to compensate adequately for the speed of head and torso movement from the acceleration forces generated at the time of impact. This will put stretch, compressive and shear stresses on
biological tissues such as muscles, ligaments, joints and nerves. As a result, this can generate pain symptoms, and affect range of motion, strength, coordination, and balance. The onset of whiplash symptoms may immediately follow a MVC or may gradually develop over the first 24-72 hours. A later onset of symptoms does not necessarily indicate a more serious injury.
Whiplash is a common injury that can be experienced following a motor vehicle collision (MVC). The unique forces generated during these collisions can stress biological tissues and result in pain, decreased functioning and disability for those affected. This article provides a review of the current scientific understanding of whiplash associated symptoms, along with guidelines on assessment and best management strategies.
Although rear-end collisions are the most commonly reported mechanism of whiplash injury, an injury may also occur following side and head-on collisions. The forces generated from these types of impacts thrust the head (and to a lesser extent the entire body) back and forth, much like a snapping whip. Injury results because the body is unable to compensate adequately for the speed of head and torso movement from the acceleration forces generated at the time of impact. This will put stretch, compressive and shear stresses on
biological tissues such as muscles, ligaments, joints and nerves. As a result, this can generate pain symptoms, and affect range of motion, strength, coordination, and balance. The onset of whiplash symptoms may immediately follow a MVC or may gradually develop over the first 24-72 hours. A later onset of symptoms does not necessarily indicate a more serious injury.
Neck pain is traditionally associated with whiplash injuries. However, the whiplash mechanism may also cause injury and symptoms that include: whole body muscle pain/ache, jaw pain, shoulder pain, referred arm pain, mid back pain, low back pain, headaches, dizziness, vertigo, tinnitus, difficulties with swallowing, hearing and memory acuity, depression and anxiety. The term WAD (Whiplash Associated Disorder)
encompasses all of these potential symptoms and is commonly used to grade the degree of injury present. WAD Grades 1 and 2 represent the majority of whiplash cases, and are commonly referred to as uncomplicated soft tissue injuries in the medical literature.
Current treatment strategies refer to the concept of “functional restoration”, an approach in which the regulated health professional is oriented toward daily function and to the delivery of treatments/interventions that help the injured person to reduce or manage their pain. The injured person is assessed to determine the level of current functioning relative to these critical demands and any functional limitations that have arisen as a result of the injury.
http://whiplash--injury.blogspot.com/2013/01/...

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