Calmare Pain Therapy Treatment can He...

Calmare Pain Therapy Treatment can Help Treat Fibromyalgia

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Rutherford Allied Medical

Old Bridge, NJ

#1 May 11, 2011
Sandy M. responded to one of our blog posts asking if Calmare might help relieve her fibromyalgia. We wanted to share our response to her–

Hi Sandy,
Thank you for your excellent question.
Yes, Calmare is definitely a viable option for your fibromyalgia. Fibromyalgia can be classified under a broader heading, specifically, Chronic Pain Syndrome of unknown etiology (cause is not well understood). The basic premise behind Calmare therapy is to treat and ameliorate chronic pain, helping sufferer’s lower their dependence on pain meds, improve their mental outlook, and help regain varying degrees of activities of daily living.
If we can offer more information, please feel free to contact us directly.

Wishing you good health,
www.calmaretherapynj.com
Rutherford Allied Medical Group
rrtzmd

Louisville, KY

#2 Jun 6, 2011
..."At Rutherford Allied Medical Group in NJ...".....personally, I think the thing is so bogus that I find it reprehensible that anyone should try to foist it on the American public...Italy turns its nose up at it for ten or twelve years so maybe we can sell it to those stupid Americans...by the way, you left out a few details:
(1)...how about talking about the inventor -- "Giuseppe Marineo"...were you aware that he was arrested in 1995 apparently for practicing medicine without a license...it appears he was trying to treat AIDS patients by providing electric current through externally applied electrodes...hmmmm, that sounds a bit similar to the "Calmare"...and I think the article says something about "many describing it as witchcraft"?...my Italian's a bit rusty so I'm not sure if my translation is accurate...
...and did you know that, despite several press releases from Competitive technologies labelling him as "MD, DSc.," that he has neither a "MD" nor a "DSc."...indeed, despite his claim to being a bioengineer, he may not, in fact, have any college degree whatsoever...yet despite that, in 2005, he published a paper wherein he labelled himself "MD, DSc."...I think there's general agreement that it's not proper to grant oneself advanced degrees for articles published in scientific journals, is it not?,,,furthermore, I note some websites refer to him as "Professor Marineo"...where exactly is he or has he ever been a professor?...nowhere that I can find...
...you also might find interesting a paper written by Marineo explaining his idea of treating AIDS by manipulating "entropy" with his device...they won't allow me to post the link so you'll have to google "groups google sci.med.aids marineo"...be sure to read the comment supplied by Christopher J. Batie, Ph.D., of the Dept. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at Louisiana State University Medical Center...pay particular attention to those paragraphs containing "crackpots," "mess," "strange," "mistaken," "wrong-headed," "magic box," "slickly presented batch of buzzwords and jargon," "meaningless," "waste of bandwidth," "doesn't know what he's talking about"...
...finally, have you examined website for Marineo's alleged research center -- "Delta Research"?...did you notice that it seems to lack any PHYSICAL address...not only that but it appears to lack a telephone number as well...he makes several references to Tor Vergata University on the site but a search of the university's website suggest they aren't aware either he or his "research center" even exists..that strikes me as being most unusual...

...I'll add more in another post...
rrtzmd

Louisville, KY

#3 Jun 6, 2011
(2)...how about a few other pertinent details...for example, how about mentioning a study that concluded the "scrambler" was not significantly different from TENS...again you'll have to google for it but the authors looked at cold pain perception and pain endurance and found no significant difference between TENS and the "calmare"...which confirms what I maintain -- it IS a TENS unit, has always BEEN a TENS unit and will always BE a TENS unit...
...and maybe point out some details from Dr. Smith's paper wherein he reported positive analgesic effects but admitted he couldn't rule out a placebo effect since he neglected to include a control group...MORE IMPORTANTLY, his other results were NOT consistent with the alleged therapeutic benefit -- emphasis mine:
"The secondary endpoints showed MINIMAL change with MC5-A Calmare therapy. There was NO consistent effect on the OTHER pain scales (data NOT shown). There was NO difference in morphine oral equivalent dose from Day 1 to Day 10 or afterward; three patients decreased their dose but the AVERAGE stayed at 110-150 mg morphine oral equivalents per day (data NOT shown.) There was NO change in formal quality of life OR symptoms other than pain, as assessed by the Symptom Assessment Diary (data not shown.)"
... internal consistency is IMPORTANT...the pain scale used SHOULD NOT matter relatively...pain is PAIN on ANY scale...you may not be able to demonstrate significant differences but you SHOULD be able to show AT LEAST a similar trend in the effects produced by the therapy...by the same token, if you claim that you have removed 80% of a patient's pain, then you SHOULD be able to demonstrate a SUBSTANTIAL decrease in analgesic use -- people that aren't hurting DON'T need as much analgesics...and if 80% of a patient's pain is gone then they SHOULD be feeling a LOT better about life in general and that effect SHOULD show up as an improvement in "quality of life"...
...in conclusion, it's a TENS unit...it's a TENS unit that was approved as such by the FDA...it's a TENS unit that ALREADY has CPT codes...it's a TENS unit that is ALREADY reimbursed by insurance companies when the physician says it's medically necessary...TENS units can be bought for 40-50 bucks on Amazon...now, everybody that wants to pay 50 THOUSAND bucks for a TENS unit, raise your hands...anybody....any...
...by the way, NOW CTT says its applied for CPT codes specific to the "calmare"...however, their application is for Category III CPT codes and they gloss overthe FACT that such codes are of use ONLY as tags to help collect trial data and are NOT used in any way, shape, or form for REIMBURSEMENT...that's typical of the shenanigans that come from Competitive Technologies -- the company promoting the device...
rrtzmd

Louisville, KY

#4 Jun 6, 2011
(3)...and I won't even go into CTT's bizarre history but one example: they hired Thomas Kocherans as a distributor...he's a former stockbroker who was sued not once but TWICE by the SEC for attempting to manipulate a stock's price; the second time the SEC sued him AND several others -- including CTT -- for attempting to manipulates CTT's stock price...the SEC fined him $50,000 for attempting to manipulate CTT stock and lo and behold he's now working for CTT!...check out the calmare pump page on Facebook under Spero Clinic...it looks like he has his entire family pumping the thing there!...the "Penny" that authors the page I'm guessing is his wife...and then there's Kelly Kocherans(sister?) who likes it...so does Theresa Kocherans(daughter?)..... look there would you, Ruth Larson Kocherans not only likes it but she even had her chronic back pain cured it!...
...I think it looks a tad "hinky" to employ a guy who was was sued for manipulating your stock's price, doesn't it?...ESPECIALLY when Tom's usual job is selling real estate!...

(4)...there are many other details...indeed, I felt compelled to file complaints with the FDA and the Federal Trade Commission about marketing of the device...after wading through several awkward webpages, I finally managed to send off:
"Basically, CTT sells a FDA approved TENS device it calls the "Calmare"...in marketing and selling this device, they make what I consider to be outrageous, physiologically impossible claims about how it works...for example, in their brochure, they claim their device "incorporates electromedical equipment for stimulation, and uses the nerve fiber as a passive
means to convey a message of normality to the central nervous system (CNS) by a procedure defined as scrambling or tricking of information, which then enables the CNS to modify the reflex adaptive responses."
...any neuroscientist will tell you that's just gobbledygook that sounds impressive but is basically nonsense...
...in that same brochure, they also say that "Doctors at a major US military medical center refer to it as TEMPR – Transcutaneous
Electrical Modulation Pain Reprocessor."...even aside from using the vague military reference to lend credence to their claim, they are clearly trying to change this thing from a TENS device to a "TEMPR" device -- even though there there really is no such thing as a "TEMPR" device and despite the device being approved ONLY as a TENS device...
...further in the same brochure, they say, "Using TEMPR technology, the patient does not become desensitized to treatments over extended cycles."...well, again, not only is there no such thing as "TEMPR technology," they have nowhere proved that patients do not become "desensitized" -- whatever "desensitized" means in this context...
...this device has started to appear in some clinics and the falsity continues...for example, from Sperotherapy's website comes this:
"Is this device similar to a TENS unit?
No. The Calmare® MC-5A device creates a low energy electrical impulse which travels through the patients nerves delivering a “no-pain” signal to the brain."
...well, it IS a TENS unit and claiming otherwise is simply false...and there is no such thing as a "no-pain signal"...then from your own website comes this:
"Calmare Pain Therapy Treatment (MC-5A) patented technology creates a series of complex artificial neuronal messages that are transmitted to the brain via the body’s dermatome pathways."
...again, more nonsense...it's physiologically impossible to send "a series of complex artificial neuronal messages" via "dermatome pathways" or any other pathway using electrodes applied to the skin...
...these treatments cost 150-250 dollars each and require -- so they claim -- 7 to 10 treatments to be effective...people seeking relief from pain shouldn't be exposed to double-talk and specious claims...it's a TENS device and should not be allowed to make claims beyond what is allowed for all other TENS devices..."
scrambler nurse

Tomball, TX

#5 Jun 20, 2011
How do you account for all the patients that have been successfully treated with the calmare machine?
rrtzmd

Louisville, KY

#6 Jun 24, 2011
..."How do you account for all the patients that have been successfully treated with the calmare machine?"...it's called the "placebo effect"...
Rutherford Allied Medical

Old Bridge, NJ

#7 Jul 19, 2011
scrambler nurse wrote:
How do you account for all the patients that have been successfully treated with the calmare machine?
That's a very sane point. Patients will speak out after any kind of therapeudic treatment, good or bad.

Thankfully, we continue to see several patients, particularly those with RSD and fibromyalgia, responding with very signifiant reductions in pain levels. We even created videos of these patients who volunteered to share their personal stories, with their permission of course, at http://calmaretherapynj.com/patient-video-sto... .

We have seen Calmare Pain Therapy Treatment successfully treat our chronic pain patients and continue to be inspired by the results.

With kind regards,
Rutherford Allied Medical Group
Pain Killer

Provo, UT

#9 Sep 25, 2011
This RTZMD is a paid spammer the belongs in jail. The last study shows this is no placebo:

Scrambler Therapy May Relieve Chronic
Neuropathic Pain More Effectively Than
Guideline-Based Drug Management: Results
of a Pilot, Randomized, Controlled Trial
Giuseppe Marineo, PhD, Vittorio Iorno, MD, Cristiano Gandini, MD,
Vincenzo Moschini, MD, and Thomas J. Smith, MD
Delta Research & Development (G.M.), Centro Ricerche Bioingegneria Medica, University of Rome
‘‘Tor Vergata,’’ Rome, Italy; Centro di Medicina del Dolore ‘‘Mario Tiengo’’(V.I., C.G., V.M.), IRCCS
Fondazione Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Mangiagalli and Regina Elena, Milan, Italy; and
Division of Hematology/Oncology and Palliative Care (T.J.S.), Massey Cancer Center, Virginia
Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia, USA
Abstract
Context. Neuropathic pain is common, disabling, and often difficult to treat.
Objectives. To compare guideline-based drug management with Scrambler
therapy, a patient-specific electrocutaneous nerve stimulation device.
Methods. A clinical trial with patients randomized to either guideline-based
pharmacological treatment or Scrambler therapy for a cycle of 10 daily sessions
was performed. Patients were matched by type of pain including postsurgical
neuropathic pain, postherpetic neuralgia, or spinal canal stenosis. Primary
outcome was change in visual analog scale (VAS) pain scores at one month;
secondary outcomes included VAS pain scores at two and three months, pain
medication use, and allodynia.
Results. Fifty-two patients were randomized. The mean VAS pain score before
treatment was 8.1 points (control) and 8.0 points (Scrambler). At one month, the
mean VAS score was reduced from 8.1 to 5.8 (28%) in the control group, and from
8 to 0.7 points (91%) in the Scrambler group (P < 0.0001). At two and three
months, the mean pain scores in the control group were 5.7 and 5.9 points,
respectively, and 1.4 and 2 points in the Scrambler group, respectively (P < 0.0001).
More relapses were seen in polyradicular pain than monoradicular pain, but
retreatment and maintenance therapy gave relief. No adverse effects were observed.
Conclusion. In this pilot randomized trial, Scrambler therapy appeared to
relieve chronic neuropathic pain better than guideline-based drug
management. J Pain Symptom Manage 2011;-:-e-. 2011 U.
Kris

Queensbury, NY

#10 Jan 20, 2012
We are looking into this treatment for our adult brother.
He has been through so much , that we are afraid that this may be just another SCAM.
He has CRPS with Allodynia.
Please .... Can someone be honest and let us know if we will harm him if he gets this treatment.
We heard that in some cases this CALMARE treatment can give the patient a serious result > like giving the patient full body CRPS.
Can someone help with an answer?
Thank you.
Kris

Queensbury, NY

#12 Feb 7, 2012
Adult male is considering Calmare treatment for CRPS/RSD.plus Allodynia.
He's afraid that the treatment will Cause his disease to go "FULL BODY"
Has this happened to any patient receiving this treatment?
We need to know as soon as possible.

Thank you.
Steve

Raleigh, NC

#13 Feb 13, 2012
Kris,
I've been following this treatment for a while now and I've read close to 100 cases of people being amazed at the results they have gotten to treat CRPS, RSD, phantom limb syndrome, failed back surgery, and much more. I have only read one case where a girl (16 years old) went full body - but she already had problems going into the treatment so it was already a last resort for her. There was no other case I have read about of anyone going full body, so I would say there is about a 1% risk based on all of the studies I have read. I have also talked to Dr. Thomas Smith, who is the Director of Medical Studies at Johns Hopkins, and he is firmly in favor of this treatment. He is the doctor who ran a study at Virginia Commonwealth University that showed a 64% reduction in pain overall for all patients, with 1/4 of the patients getting 100% pain relief. After the VCU study, he was hired at Johns Hopkins (one of the premier medical schools in the country) and he said will be running a similar trial there. Dr. Charles Loprinzi at the Mayo Clinic is conducting several trials testing the Calmare therapy on multiple conditions. He said that he has seen very positive early results of the trial at the Mayo Clinic.
My advise to you would be to talk to one of the doctors at one of the clinics offering Calmare therapy. They can tell you best whether the therapy would be right for your brother or not. Some of the clinics that I have heard the most positive results from are Dr. Gregory Sheen at www.ctprc.com and Dr. Cooney at www.calmaretherapynj.com but there are several others in the New York/ New England area. Talk to these doctors rather than website forums.
Andy

Seattle, WA

#14 Feb 17, 2012
Kris wrote:
We are looking into this treatment for our adult brother.
He has been through so much , that we are afraid that this may be just another SCAM.
He has CRPS with Allodynia.
Please .... Can someone be honest and let us know if we will harm him if he gets this treatment.
We heard that in some cases this CALMARE treatment can give the patient a serious result > like giving the patient full body CRPS.
Can someone help with an answer?
Thank you.
Do it. There is no downside other than the money spent, and the upside potential is off the map.

My daughter had a 6 month bout with CRPS/RSD (there are so many overlapping diagnoses that it was often hard to keep up with what the current one was), and we tried everything the mainline and alternative medical communities suggested, and nothing worked. She had constant pain on an 8 out 10, with spikes to 10 and never below a 6. My wife heard about Calmare, and we booked a two week stint with Dr. D'Amato in Rhode Island, flying in from out of state. To say the results were miraculous is an understatement. Within 5 minutes of hooking her up to the machine the first day, her pain was completely gone. It returned at a 2 level once she was done with that day's treatment, but after several days, was consistently at a 0 day in and day out.

I do not know if it will work for your bother, but I do know this - it is absolutely not a scam and well worth trying.
Brothej

Quakers Hill, Australia

#15 Mar 1, 2012
Kris wrote:
We are looking into this treatment for our adult brother.
He has been through so much , that we are afraid that this may be just another SCAM.
He has CRPS with Allodynia.
Please .... Can someone be honest and let us know if we will harm him if he gets this treatment.
We heard that in some cases this CALMARE treatment can give the patient a serious result > like giving the patient full body CRPS.
Can someone help with an answer?
Thank you.
My sister who has suffered chronic pain with fybromyalgia following guilliane barres for ten years has just had her first calmare treatment and is pain free, initial result expected to last some hours but will be followed up by ten daily sessions to retrain her brain for longer term relief, isn't anything worth one try when someone has lived with pain for so long?
rrtzmd

Louisville, KY

#16 Mar 6, 2012
..."it is absolutely not a scam and well worth trying."???...well, if it's NOT a "scam" and it works SO WELL and because it's so EXPENSIVE, then the providers ought to be willing to offer some sort of money back guarantee if not satisfied -- right?...

...potential clients should also review the MAUDE adverse effects reports filed on the device at the FDA website:

http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cf...

...note that the "mc-5a" is the same as the "calmare"...
Min227

United States

#17 Aug 1, 2012
You have no idea what you are talking about. I having been living with pain that has interrupted my life for 15 years. It took the Calmare machine 10 minutes to completely stop the pain. I was totally shocked! It was the first time in many years that I was out of pain. That session lasted 4 days! I wish you the bet.
rrtzmd wrote:
..."At Rutherford Allied Medical Group in NJ...".....personally, I think the thing is so bogus that I find it reprehensible that anyone should try to foist it on the American public...Italy turns its nose up at it for ten or twelve years so maybe we can sell it to those stupid Americans...by the way, you left out a few details:
(1)...how about talking about the inventor -- "Giuseppe Marineo"...were you aware that he was arrested in 1995 apparently for practicing medicine without a license...it appears he was trying to treat AIDS patients by providing electric current through externally applied electrodes...hmmmm, that sounds a bit similar to the "Calmare"...and I think the article says something about "many describing it as witchcraft"?...my Italian's a bit rusty so I'm not sure if my translation is accurate...
...and did you know that, despite several press releases from Competitive technologies labelling him as "MD, DSc.," that he has neither a "MD" nor a "DSc."...indeed, despite his claim to being a bioengineer, he may not, in fact, have any college degree whatsoever...yet despite that, in 2005, he published a paper wherein he labelled himself "MD, DSc."...I think there's general agreement that it's not proper to grant oneself advanced degrees for articles published in scientific journals, is it not?,,,furthermore, I note some websites refer to him as "Professor Marineo"...where exactly is he or has he ever been a professor?...nowhere that I can find...
...you also might find interesting a paper written by Marineo explaining his idea of treating AIDS by manipulating "entropy" with his device...they won't allow me to post the link so you'll have to google "groups google sci.med.aids marineo"...be sure to read the comment supplied by Christopher J. Batie, Ph.D., of the Dept. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at Louisiana State University Medical Center...pay particular attention to those paragraphs containing "crackpots," "mess," "strange," "mistaken," "wrong-headed," "magic box," "slickly presented batch of buzzwords and jargon," "meaningless," "waste of bandwidth," "doesn't know what he's talking about"...
...finally, have you examined website for Marineo's alleged research center -- "Delta Research"?...did you notice that it seems to lack any PHYSICAL address...not only that but it appears to lack a telephone number as well...he makes several references to Tor Vergata University on the site but a search of the university's website suggest they aren't aware either he or his "research center" even exists..that strikes me as being most unusual...
...I'll add more in another post...
Dr T N Kuppusami- Madurai

Dindigul, India

#18 Aug 10, 2012
I have been treating patients suffering from diabetic neuropathy, cervical spondilytis with neuropathy, lumbago, sciatic, cancer pains in my calmare paintherapy clinic for the last one year. I have foung it very useful in relieving pain,especially very effective in cancer pain.
Dr T N KUPPUSAMI< madurai, India
Dr T N Kuppusami

Madurai, India

#19 Mar 7, 2013
Last month, I gave calmare treatment to back where my patient had severe pain of radiculitis from an attack of Shingles. With one treatment for 30 minutes, he became completely pain free. He is a retired teacher, 75 years old, now happy.
Dr T N Kuppusami, Madurai, India
Dr T N Kuppusami Madurai

Bangalore, India

#20 Mar 19, 2013
We all know it is very difficult to treat arthritis of the knee joints and also it is very common worldwide. The curative treatment now is knee rplacement. Now I am using calmare therapy to alleviate pain. It has been found some patients are pain free or comfortable atleast after few sessions. I combine this therapy with other modalities.
Dr FK Ireland

Dublin, Ireland

#21 Mar 19, 2013
I have been using Calmare therapy for Fibromyalgia patients and have found it to be useful
The pain score improved from 8/10 before treatment to average 3/10 post treatment in many Fibromyalgia patients treated in my experience.
E mail
[email protected]
peterk

Saint Albans, UK

#22 Jul 25, 2013
my friend's daughter Helen suffered severely with what was diagnosed with CRPS at Harley Street and Bath hospital. They could not offer any remedy for it. Fortunately, for her, her family managed to find information on Calmare, and they found a practitioner using this equipment in Dublin. She had the treatment for 10 sessions and came back fully recovered. She went back to work and recently got married and now expecting a baby as well. She, as expected, might have to go in for short therapies from time to time. Her leg which was completely life-less is fully functional, and the pain is gone. My own sister who was suffering from PSP (progressive supranuclear palsy) for two years is being treated at this moment and her pain has gone. She is treated by Dr Russo in Italy. Today is her third day of therapy and she does not have to use her wheelchair anymore. Her facial muscles are back to normal, can turn her neck around, can turn the body around without losing balance etc. This is a remarkable therapy. Unfortunately many doctors are not convinced yet. But eventually they will be.
I will comment here again after she finishes the whole treatment.

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