Controversy infects Lyme Disease trea...

Controversy infects Lyme Disease treatment, diagnosis

There are 16 comments on the Connecticut Post story from Jul 19, 2009, titled Controversy infects Lyme Disease treatment, diagnosis. In it, Connecticut Post reports that:

Even now, 13 years after she was infected, Phyllis Esposito-Doyen still experiences flare ups of her Lyme Disease.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Connecticut Post.

Andres

Windsor, CT

#1 Jul 19, 2009
This is another reason to get deer and eat the meat.
Andres

Windsor, CT

#2 Jul 19, 2009
To kill the deer and eat the meat.
Scammed by Lyme Drs

Dallas, TX

#4 Jul 20, 2009
My relative was falsely diagnosed with Lyme Disease by some doctor who was making quite a profit off of it! Giving her IV infusions of antibiotics not covered by her insurance for a couple a years and thousands of dollars.

Turned out she had early onset Alzheimers, not Lyme. The years wasted by this guy could have been spent giving her medicines to slow the onset and plan her long term care.

What a waste, all those drugs contribute to antibiotic resistant infections. They used thousands of dollars she needed for long term nursing home care. Scam artist.
Not so simple

Dallas, TX

#5 Jul 20, 2009
Andres wrote:
This is another reason to get deer and eat the meat.
Then you'd better also hunt all the squirrels, skunks, rabbits, chipmunks, mice, and rats. They carry far more infected deer ticks combined than deer.

Also, you'd better clear cut all trees in the State, because tick populations are directly related to the size of the annual acorn crop. Acorn crops are related to the weather, so you'd better change the weather, too. Large acorn crops make populations of small mammals explode to higher proportions. These larger populations carry more ticks and transmit them to larger animals such as deer and humans.

It's not as simple as shooting a few deer. Hunting has almost no impact on Lyme disease. Shoot the deer, the ticks go to another animal. Nature is a complex web, and not as simple as people like to think.

There are other methods being researched that appear promising, such as deer salt licks or feeding stations with insecticide medicine - similar medicine to what people give their dogs each month to kill fleas and ticks. Similar ideas could work for other types of animals as well. But the population can only be dampened, not eliminated.

The key to not getting Lyme Disease is using bug spray and checking yourself for ticks after hikes or yard work. If you get the tick pulled off by the head within a few hours, you'll be safe. It take a few hours after the tick bites to transmit the disease. Then call your doctor to see if you should get antibiotics, keep the tick in a plastic ziplock bag or tupperware to show your doctor.
fEd-up

Stamford, CT

#6 Jul 20, 2009
Not so simple wrote:
<quoted text>
Then you'd better also hunt all the squirrels, skunks, rabbits, chipmunks, mice, and rats. They carry far more infected deer ticks combined than deer.
Also, you'd better clear cut all trees in the State, because tick populations are directly related to the size of the annual acorn crop. Acorn crops are related to the weather, so you'd better change the weather, too. Large acorn crops make populations of small mammals explode to higher proportions. These larger populations carry more ticks and transmit them to larger animals such as deer and humans.
It's not as simple as shooting a few deer. Hunting has almost no impact on Lyme disease. Shoot the deer, the ticks go to another animal. Nature is a complex web, and not as simple as people like to think.
There are other methods being researched that appear promising, such as deer salt licks or feeding stations with insecticide medicine - similar medicine to what people give their dogs each month to kill fleas and ticks. Similar ideas could work for other types of animals as well. But the population can only be dampened, not eliminated.
The key to not getting Lyme Disease is using bug spray and checking yourself for ticks after hikes or yard work. If you get the tick pulled off by the head within a few hours, you'll be safe. It take a few hours after the tick bites to transmit the disease. Then call your doctor to see if you should get antibiotics, keep the tick in a plastic ziplock bag or tupperware to show your doctor.
You are in California. Keep the heck away from Connecticut痴 business. Go hug a tree or something. Lyme is our own decease. We値l deal with it the way we want. If Andres wants to go shoot a deer, by al means Andres, go shoot it.

Thanks for all your helpful advice. We値l turn our state into a giant parking lot. Now, stay on your side of the country and keep your thoughts to yourself. You know, now I知 in the mood for some venison or some rabbit stew.
Not so simple

Dallas, TX

#7 Jul 20, 2009
fEd-up wrote:
<quoted text>
You are in California. Keep the heck away from Connecticut痴 business. Go hug a tree or something. Lyme is our own decease. We値l deal with it the way we want. If Andres wants to go shoot a deer, by al means Andres, go shoot it.
Thanks for all your helpful advice. We値l turn our state into a giant parking lot. Now, stay on your side of the country and keep your thoughts to yourself. You know, now I知 in the mood for some venison or some rabbit stew.
I'm not in California. I'm sitting right here in Connecticut and was born and raised here.

Please learn more about how the internet works before making nasty accusations. The location of an ISP does not denote the location of the people connected to it. Just because I don't use the lousy local choices of internet providers doesn't mean I disappeared out of my chair and teleported to California.

Never said I was against hunting, either. Humans have been hunting for all of history it is a part of the natural order of things. I just said it would do little to prevent Lyme. What a nasty presumption on your part.

How rude you are to a girl who is just trying to help someone understand the spread of Lyme is not related directly to hunting.:(
Grumpy Old Man

Clifton, NJ

#9 Jul 20, 2009
fEd-up wrote:
<quoted text>
You are in California. Keep the heck away from Connecticut痴 business. Go hug a tree or something. Lyme is our own decease. We値l deal with it the way we want. If Andres wants to go shoot a deer, by al means Andres, go shoot it.
Thanks for all your helpful advice. We値l turn our state into a giant parking lot. Now, stay on your side of the country and keep your thoughts to yourself. You know, now I知 in the mood for some venison or some rabbit stew.
What a mean person you are! Someone should teach you some manners young man. That is no way for you to talk to a lady.

I'm as old as dirt and even I know that the city the internet service company is located in is not where the person lives. Depends on what company they sign up for and there's lots of companies out there.

Mine only says Stamford because I got that cable internet service. Other people's computers route through different states or cities.

Better learn how these "intertubes" work boy!
gemofnj

Indianapolis, IN

#10 Jul 20, 2009
Most people do not get a rash. Lyme needs long term antibiotic treatment as it can only be eradicated during the reproductive stage, which is every 3-4 weeks. There is no cure. There are not many accurate labs, Igenex in CA is one that test for 15 bands instead of 3-5. There are not many Lyme Literate Doctors.

My treatment lasted over 8 months and I did not get a diagnosis until 4 doctors and 7 months after infection. My symptoms were stuttering, joint/muscle pain, confusion, loss of vision, irregular heartbeat, flu like symptoms, fever, swollen lymph nodes, stiff neck, restless sleep, light and sound sensitivities, and list goes on and on. I am in remission, but still suffering from symptoms.

Lyme is a spirochete and related to syphilis. It can be deadly if left untreated.

There are also other bacteria that travel with the lyme bacteria called coinfections. They are also hard to diagnose. We need better testing and more doctors that follow ILADS protocol. Someone please listen!!!
Moron Whig Party

New Rochelle, NY

#11 Jul 20, 2009
Republicans are causing this controversy no one else
Grumpy Old Man

Clifton, NJ

#12 Jul 20, 2009
Not so simple wrote:
<quoted text>
Then you'd better also hunt all the squirrels, skunks, rabbits, chipmunks, mice, and rats. They carry far more infected deer ticks combined than deer.
Also, you'd better clear cut all trees in the State, because tick populations are directly related to the size of the annual acorn crop. Acorn crops are related to the weather, so you'd better change the weather, too. Large acorn crops make populations of small mammals explode to higher proportions. These larger populations carry more ticks and transmit them to larger animals such as deer and humans.
It's not as simple as shooting a few deer. Hunting has almost no impact on Lyme disease. Shoot the deer, the ticks go to another animal. Nature is a complex web, and not as simple as people like to think.
There are other methods being researched that appear promising, such as deer salt licks or feeding stations with insecticide medicine - similar medicine to what people give their dogs each month to kill fleas and ticks. Similar ideas could work for other types of animals as well. But the population can only be dampened, not eliminated.
The key to not getting Lyme Disease is using bug spray and checking yourself for ticks after hikes or yard work. If you get the tick pulled off by the head within a few hours, you'll be safe. It take a few hours after the tick bites to transmit the disease. Then call your doctor to see if you should get antibiotics, keep the tick in a plastic ziplock bag or tupperware to show your doctor.
Thank you for the ecology lesson ma'am. You must be a school teacher. I was a bit rusty! I agree there is more to it than the deer. Hunting is fine and dandy as long as it is not cruel - kill accurate and fast and cook what you kill, don't waste it. But it may not do a lot to stop Lyme sickness. The ticks will just hop to something else. Lots of other animals in the forest for ticks. Just cause its called deer tick doesn't mean it don't like other animals. It likes people, right? They don't call it a people tick!
TerryK

United States

#13 Jul 20, 2009
Scammed - I'm very sorry to hear about your relative having Alzheimers. You might like to know that a lyme researcher found spirochetes in the brain plaque of 7 out of 10 Alzheimers patients.

Go here:
http://stcatherines.chsli.org/research.htm

Scroll down the page and read the information contained in this document.
"Plaques of Alzheimer's disease originate from the
Cysts of Borrelia burgdorferi, the Lyme Disease spirochete"

If you want to know more about the true nature of lyme disease (science, politics etc.), please read "Cure Unknown". It was written by a respected science writer who is a Senior Editor for Discover Magazine.
Terry
ella

Shreveport, LA

#14 Jul 20, 2009
Ct.has done a fine job considering Lyme disease. i sure would appreciate yall sending some of that wisdom down to NC.
joe schmoe

Neptune, NJ

#15 Jul 20, 2009
I keep hearing that the deer ticks are not just on deer. But: I grew up in southern greenwich i.e. south of I-95. As a kid, we had no ticks whatsoever.. played in grass, laid around, never even check for ticks. For what its worth, I graduated from GHS in 1991. Anyway, even in high school 89-91, my friends who lived in backcountry had tick and lyme problems, but, south of I-95, we didn't. Now, when I visit my mother, and bring my kids, there are two things: Ticks and deer. Really, 200 yards from the ocean, deer.

So, is it really just coincidence that the tics arrived with the deer? Sounds to me like the anti-hunting types, like that crazy swedish chick, just keep saying that its not the deer when really it is.
Scammed by Lyme Drs

Dallas, TX

#16 Jul 21, 2009
TerryK wrote:
Scammed - I'm very sorry to hear about your relative having Alzheimers. You might like to know that a lyme researcher found spirochetes in the brain plaque of 7 out of 10 Alzheimers patients.
Go here:
http://stcatherines.chsli.org/research.htm
Scroll down the page and read the information contained in this document.
"Plaques of Alzheimer's disease originate from the
Cysts of Borrelia burgdorferi, the Lyme Disease spirochete"
If you want to know more about the true nature of lyme disease (science, politics etc.), please read "Cure Unknown". It was written by a respected science writer who is a Senior Editor for Discover Magazine.
Terry
Thank you that is very interesting information. I will read the articles. But I wonder - if that is true, and Alzheimers is caused by Lyme Disease, how would that account for the millions of cases of Alzheimers in other countries across the world where there is no Lyme Disease or deer ticks?

In my relative's case, it turned out to be genetic early onset Alzheimers, on her side of the family. She tested positive for the hereditary gene.
dmc

Wethersfield, CT

#17 Jul 21, 2009
joe schmoe wrote:
I keep hearing that the deer ticks are not just on deer. But: I grew up in southern greenwich i.e. south of I-95. As a kid, we had no ticks whatsoever.. played in grass, laid around, never even check for ticks. For what its worth, I graduated from GHS in 1991. Anyway, even in high school 89-91, my friends who lived in backcountry had tick and lyme problems, but, south of I-95, we didn't. Now, when I visit my mother, and bring my kids, there are two things: Ticks and deer. Really, 200 yards from the ocean, deer.
So, is it really just coincidence that the tics arrived with the deer? Sounds to me like the anti-hunting types, like that crazy swedish chick, just keep saying that its not the deer when really it is.
Naw, It's the fact that we are no longer spraying for bugs nor is burning leaves allowed.

Years ago they used to do spraying by planes. Not a
very health conscience practice but it worked, not as many bugs.

My parents remember the planes spraying & having to bring the laundry in from the clothesline.

Leaves were burned rather than bagged or picked up by the municipalities. Ticks love leaf litter and it is common for their "nests" to be found in piles
of leaf debris.
TerryK

United States

#18 Jul 21, 2009
Hi scammed - interesting about early onset, heriditary AD. Some years ago my MD's mother had AD but she told me she wasn't concerned because AD was not heriditary. Apparently, research proves otherwise in a small number of patients. According to this link - 5%.
http://www.nia.nih.gov/Alzheimers/Publication...

I do not think that all cases of Alzheimers Disease would be caused by Lyme Disease but current research seems to point to Lyme disease as a likely cause for some cases.

Lyme disease is known to exist world-wide. Birds travel and carry ticks... There are 300 strains of borrelia world-wide (100 in the US) but only 1 is used in testing except for one lab that uses 2 strains. There are many other problems with current testing which make the tests inaccurate. This means that tests can be negative even though a person is infected.

Unfortunately, due to the unreliable tests that currently exist, diagnosis of Lyme Disease must be a clinical one. This means that the judgement of the doctor comes into play.

Lyme disease has many overlapping symptoms with other diseases making it very hard for even the best doctors to render an accurate diagnosis. I'm very sorry that your relative appears to be one who was misdiagnosed.

Misdiagnosis around lyme disease happens all the time but it is usually those who have lyme disease who are diagnosed with other illnesses. Some have lost their lives because they did not get treatment in time. It is a terrible tragedy either way.

While there are no doubt some doctors who prey on patients, I believe the majority of doctors who treat Lyme disease are well meaning, caring individuals who are not taking advantage of patients but are trying to help this disenfranchised population of patients recover from a debilitating disease.

I was one who was misdiagnosed for decades. I had finally reached a point of complete disability and lived daily with horrific pain. The overall body wracking pain went on for 9 long years. After 3 years of treatment under an ILADS trained M.D., my pain level is down by 70% and many other symptoms are gone. I'm still really sick but I don't think about dieing everyday now.

For those who don't know, it is important to use ILADS doctors when being treated for Lyme disease rather than just anyone who states that they are lyme literate.
www.ilads.org

I wish the best for you and your relative. I hope that they come up with solutions for heriditary AD and Lyme Disease sooner rather than later.

Terry

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