Sex-ed fight began with condom and ba...

Sex-ed fight began with condom and banana

There are 61 comments on the Chicago Tribune story from Feb 20, 2008, titled Sex-ed fight began with condom and banana. In it, Chicago Tribune reports that:

A tussle that began with a condom and a banana has morphed into all-out war at a New Jersey high school, with some parents trying to end a peer-to-peer sexual-education course taught in about 45 other public ...

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Chicago Tribune.

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Turbo

Chicago, IL

#1 Feb 20, 2008
Let's make sure we prevent teens from being educated about sexuality. Keep perpetuatuing our culture of censorship by pretending that these kids aren't already having sex or won't be soon.
Spector

Chicago, IL

#2 Feb 20, 2008
They should have used something more realistic than a silly banana.
Dienne

United States

#3 Feb 20, 2008
What's with this "(EDITORS: STORY CAN END HERE)"? All the actual data, the evidence that abstinence education doesn't work and comprehensive sex education does, is presented after that note. So it's okay to run a story about parent's concerns about, OMG, their child learning about sex and birth control, but not include the actual FACTUAL information about the effectiveness of abstinence-only vs. comprehensive sex education?

Makes me wonder how many other stories actually do get cut off before presenting factual information.
Sue

Mount Prospect, IL

#4 Feb 20, 2008
Turbo wrote:
Let's make sure we prevent teens from being educated about sexuality. Keep perpetuatuing our culture of censorship by pretending that these kids aren't already having sex or won't be soon.
What you say may be true, but I sure would have liked to know what the curriculum was before my daughter's class practiced putting condoms on cucumbers.(The kids did not know about condom practice until they were actually in the classroom.) It then gives me the opportunity to reinforce the beliefs that I have already discussed with her. For some people, the issue is that the schools are not forthcoming about what is being taught. I get much more detailed (less elusive)syllabi from the math, science, social studies, and Enlgish teachers than I do from the health department. Some of these issues being taught are moral issues and should/could be used as an opportunity for parents to communicate with their children. And for those families (Mormoms, Muslims)in our school who objected for religious reasons, I respect their objections and hope that you also would respect them.
Amanda

Dundee, IL

#5 Feb 20, 2008
Once again parents stick their head in the sand and pretend teen sex isn't happening. Yes, maybe the course would be better taught by teachers rather than upperclassmen. But the old argument is the same. Parents, wake up and realize that your precious snowflakes may not be as innocent as you want to believe. And for those of you who believe that comprehensive sex ed leads to more teen sex, show me a study that proves it.
LOL

San Francisco, CA

#6 Feb 20, 2008
Sue wrote:
<quoted text>
What you say may be true, but I sure would have liked to know what the curriculum was before my daughter's class practiced putting condoms on cucumbers.(The kids did not know about condom practice until they were actually in the classroom.) It then gives me the opportunity to reinforce the beliefs that I have already discussed with her. For some people, the issue is that the schools are not forthcoming about what is being taught. I get much more detailed (less elusive)syllabi from the math, science, social studies, and Enlgish teachers than I do from the health department. Some of these issues being taught are moral issues and should/could be used as an opportunity for parents to communicate with their children. And for those families (Mormoms, Muslims)in our school who objected for religious reasons, I respect their objections and hope that you also would respect them.
I don't respect religious objections. Shoulda, coulda woulda, leads to pregnant, is that your preference Sue? Get your head out of the sand parents! It's 2008 and you still don't know anything about sex, so how do you think your children are going to learn.
Jamie

Elgin, IL

#7 Feb 20, 2008
STIs and pregnancy are not issues of morality. They are fact. Some kids have sex at an early age: fact. You can't predict who those kids will be so it's important to educate them all. Giving the kid the information doesn't convince them to have sex...it helps them make the safe decision that's right for them regardless of their parents' morality. If they share their parents' beliefs, it's a non-issue.

I think it's brilliant that they're having students teach other students. These kids are at an age where they're listening more to their peers than to authority figures. Also, when students are put in a "teaching" position it reinforces leadership qualities and self-esteem. Not to mention, get one popular kid in that group, and getting informed suddenly becomes the thing-to-do.

We're focused too much on morality, and not enough on making sure that our youth is SAFE in the reality of this world.
Jamie

Elgin, IL

#8 Feb 20, 2008
PS: I'm horrified that there are parents out there who object to their children being taught tolerance. I don't care what their religious beliefs are. All people are people regardless of what gender they have sex with.
terri

Chicago, IL

#9 Feb 20, 2008
Why were they upset about a condom on a banana? Would they prefer a condom on the boy's actual....... never mind.

Kids get all kinds of misinformation. The parents who don't want their teens knowing about contraception I don't understand it. If their kids are such angels and would take 100% to abstinence, then how would it hurt them to know about contraception?
Rhonda

United States

#13 Feb 20, 2008
Don't kid yourself. These kids know more about sex than you think. Teens will continue to be careless and reckless regardless of what they are taught. That part of their brains (common sense) has not matured yet. Teens feel like they will live forever and only bad things happen to others.
jjrg7

Raleigh, NC

#14 Feb 20, 2008
I much prefer when I am the one discussing these issues with my children. Trust me when I say they feel comfortable asking a lot more detailed questions than in a classroom with other students.
good grief

Jersey City, NJ

#15 Feb 20, 2008
they should have used a cucumber instead.

the peer-to-peer course is needed in all schools, in my opinion, but maybe with an adult teacher moderating the lessons and conversations.

teens need to know how to use a condom. i'd rather my teen learn it in a classroom than fumble around and give up when it matters.

practice safe sex.
jjrg7

Raleigh, NC

#16 Feb 20, 2008
good grief wrote:
they should have used a cucumber instead.
the peer-to-peer course is needed in all schools, in my opinion, but maybe with an adult teacher moderating the lessons and conversations.
teens need to know how to use a condom. i'd rather my teen learn it in a classroom than fumble around and give up when it matters.
practice safe sex.
From most men I know, they should have used a pickle rather than a cucumber or a banana. hehehehehe
goon

Wadsworth, IL

#17 Feb 20, 2008
Maybe they should get the John Clease character from Monty Python's Meaning of Life to teach sex ed?

The instructor could bring in his wife, girlfriend, hooker, or whatever. Demonstrate all the different positions, birth control methods, and maybe even have a day where they just sit in class and discuss the merits of waiting until your ball fall off to screw.

Whatever it is, I know I would learn a lot from this type of lesson. There is a lot we could learn about sex that has gone undiscovered up tp now. In fact, at the end of the semester the instructor could require an analysis of the student's sexuality.

I think we're missing a golden opportunity to save some cucumbers and really get to the heart of an issue!
Dienne

United States

#18 Feb 20, 2008
terri wrote:
Why were they upset about a condom on a banana? Would they prefer a condom on the boy's actual....... never mind.
Kids get all kinds of misinformation. The parents who don't want their teens knowing about contraception I don't understand it. If their kids are such angels and would take 100% to abstinence, then how would it hurt them to know about contraception?
Because, m'dear, if they know about condoms, then they'll want to have sex. You saw how in that other forum, just reading about homosexuality turned us all gay!

(For other readers of this forum, to understand the joke, go to Amy Dickinson's column a couple days ago about the lesbian daughter.)
Balls

Dallas, TX

#19 Feb 20, 2008
Spector wrote:
They should have used something more realistic than a silly banana.
Cucumber then?
Joe

United States

#20 Feb 20, 2008
To me, the best for of birth controll was seeing parts of a birth on a vido (not the actual birth, but also hearing a doctor talk abotu things like an epeziotomy. Oh, that and being a camp counselor.

Now I do have a 1 year old daughter and a son due in July, but I sure waited to have sex until I knew I was ready to raise a child. My wife and I did things the "now non taditional way" in that we were virgins when we meet, have only been with each other and waited until after our wedding to have kids. We are trully the "odd" ones on both sides of the family because of this.
terri

Chicago, IL

#21 Feb 20, 2008
Dienne wrote:
<quoted text>
Because, m'dear, if they know about condoms, then they'll want to have sex. You saw how in that other forum, just reading about homosexuality turned us all gay!
(For other readers of this forum, to understand the joke, go to Amy Dickinson's column a couple days ago about the lesbian daughter.)
Ah, true that.
Bubba

Schaumburg, IL

#22 Feb 20, 2008
Jamie wrote:
PS: I'm horrified that there are parents out there who object to their children being taught tolerance. I don't care what their religious beliefs are. All people are people regardless of what gender they have sex with.
Horrified? Shouldn't you reserve that for, say, axe murderers? I don't care, that you don't care, what other peoples religious beliefs are. Mind your own business. For many people, religious beliefs and morals ARE important, so respect that.
Jamie

Elgin, IL

#23 Feb 20, 2008
Bubba wrote:
<quoted text>
Horrified? Shouldn't you reserve that for, say, axe murderers? I don't care, that you don't care, what other peoples religious beliefs are. Mind your own business. For many people, religious beliefs and morals ARE important, so respect that.
I agree that religious beliefs and morality are important to each individual and should be respected. I, however, do not believe that they are an excuse to spread hatred. I do not respect people who use their beliefs as an excuse to humiliate, demean, and condemn other human beings.

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