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bking

Carlsbad, CA

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#1
Nov 25, 2006
 
How long after my surgery will I be able to climb and decend a flight of stairs?
Patty

Vancouver, Canada

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#2
Nov 30, 2006
 
Before I left the hospital after having my hip replaced I was shown how to go up and down stairs.
I did not do that until I had my staples removed after 10 days and was told to wait 2 days before bathing. Our bath is upstairs and I managed ok. I know can go up and down with crutches myself and it has been 10 weeks since my surgery. I would like to walk more but the we have had too much snow. I used a walker for 8 weeks then crutches until I was good at them then I used 1 cructch and I switch from a cane to 1 crutch until the muscles in my right hip get stronger.
BONE

United States

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#3
Dec 2, 2006
 
I've had 3 hip surgerys,(2 relacements 1 revision). Stairs are friend and foe. Be careful. A friend of ours fell down his stairs and twisted and jammed his new hip and had to have another surgery. Use crutch or cane and railing to control the force and to avoid limping. In a month or so you will doing rehab on stairs. Up, down, forwards and backwards and sideways. The tallest building in our town is three stories. I spent a fair bit of time there in the stairwell. Good luck!
rici

Bangor, PA

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#4
Apr 28, 2007
 
I am scheduled for hip replacement this coming July. My bed and bath are both upstairs and I wonder how I will manage.
Is it possible to go up stairs when one comes home? What does one need in order to bathe?
I would like to prepare for this.
Anne

Hopkins, MN

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#5
May 4, 2007
 
Your physical therapist won't let you leave the hospital until you can do stairs on your own. I had one of those adjustable seats in my tub, a rail on the rim of the tub for balancing to get in and out, and the best thing you can get is a removable shower head so you can spray yourself and not have to bend over. I'd plan on having someone help you shower the first couple of times until your strength increases.
John Moldovan

Plymouth, MI

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#6
May 31, 2007
 
rici wrote:
I am scheduled for hip replacement this coming July. My bed and bath are both upstairs and I wonder how I will manage.
Is it possible to go up stairs when one comes home? What does one need in order to bathe?
I would like to prepare for this.
I will give you and example of my traditionalTHR done on 01 May 2007.
My surgery went well I went home on the fifth day post op. Restrictions are not to put weight on hip so I use walker and "toe drag" left leg. First week home was rough because of the weak muscles, I had problems with single steps.(I live in a ranch style home with everything on first floor). I am quite in shape that allows me to support myself on walker as this method uses a lot of tricept strength.(am getting callouses on both palms). Weather or not Doctor gave me permission for stairs I couldn't do them for the first week or so while at home. My wife took a week from work to help me (I really needed this). After the first week I could get around better and she went back to work.

First visit to surgeon was 16 May when staples were removed and x ray performed. Surgeon was satisfied but informed me to stay on walker for three more weeks until the second visit 06 June.

Most important (in my opinion) items you will need will be:
1. elevated toilet seat.(I prefer the "bedside" one because it enabled me to raise and lower to my satisfaction and had good strong rails. You can put it over your existing toilet).

2. Shower seat. I got the cheaper seat that didn't extend over the tub so the first week my wife held my hand for support while I stepped into tub then sat down).

3. Hand held shower head.(I installed prior to going to hospital).

4. Hip kit contents are pick up and dressing sticks (I use them all the time and have hanging on my walker). along with the other items you will need to dress as time goes on.

5. Portable potty to urinate into.(light weight plastic bottle I hung mine on the walker). Believe it..during the first and second week it will save you steps (especially going upstairs) and at night when you must get up.

In summary and from my experience you will have a problem with the stairs. If at all possible have someone with you 24/7 for the first week.

Good luck My friend
John Moldovan
Northville Michigan
wendy grocott

UK

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#7
Jun 1, 2007
 
rici wrote:
I am scheduled for hip replacement this coming July. My bed and bath are both upstairs and I wonder how I will manage.
Is it possible to go up stairs when one comes home? What does one need in order to bathe?
I would like to prepare for this.
You won't have any problem with the stairs going up or down after 3 days I did the stairs and found them very easy.A shower would be better and very easy as long as you prepare before you shower As long as you follow your physiotherapy instructions of getting in and out of bed you will have no problems
abubaker

Guilherand, France

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#8
Jan 14, 2009
 
Can you set down on the floor now?
Amy

Southall, UK

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#9
Feb 19, 2009
 
im 16 and have to have both hips replaced due to steroids when i was diognosed with leukaemia... i am in remission now and doing good but this op has made things harder... its gettin soon to the time and im freaking out about what i can and cannot do... meaning.. mucking around with friends, sitting down on the ground, having a bath, and normal kid things.. i want to know exactly what my life will hold as im worried ill be boring and not as fun as i used to because im restricted to do what others can... can someone plz explain what life is like for them and whether or not your able to do anything, im really scared..
Kathy

United States

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#10
Feb 27, 2009
 
Amy - are you having the anterior replacement or posterior? If posterior, you may want to look into the blogs on the anterior. You will feel very reassured. I go in a week from now for a replacement. I too am afraid. I fractured my hip falling from a horse. It never healed right. I was petrified of a replacement. But I now wish I had have gone with a replacement versus the procedure to try and preserve my hip. I know it's not optimum for anyone and your own hip is the best, but when you have problems, you have to do what you can. And this anterior approach, with the right prosthetics, can really be a life changer. I have heard that I will have virtually no restrictions, can ride my horses again, cross my legs, no special pillows, and that if I take care of it and myself it will last me a long time. So think positive. Like me, you have no choice. You can't let things be. Mine will collapse if I don't replace it. So go for the best method and outcome. With the advances in hip replacements, you should be able to do normal things. Within reason. You will probably never run a marathon. And it's not to say you "can't" with these new hips. But you will wear it out faster. Your doctor will advise what will and won't do this. If you are not doing the anterior approach, look into that first. After you talk to people that have had it you will feel a lot better. I know a guy that just had one that does motor cross. He's in his lower 20s. He's back out again and doesn't even feel like he had a replacement. Not that I recommend this.:) But you will be fine.:)
sheila

UK

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#11
Sep 22, 2009
 
I am 58 yrs old i have to have a hip replace ment and i am also worried that i wont be able to walk without a stick, and that i will always have to have a raised toilet seat also will i be able to have a bath without special seats i just want to be able to do things that we all take for granted , iam lucky that i will be getting lots of help from my family i just don't like change .
morty

Kingston, Canada

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#12
Sep 24, 2009
 

Judged:

1

hi sheila,

i'm 70 years old and underwent thr surgery 5 months ago.

today i am nearly totally recovered and can do everything from walking several miles/day to dancing to stretching to walking up and down stairs.

so you see, you have nothing to worry about: you will be fine.

do whatever the physiotherapist prescribes and be patient.

good luck!!

morty
Lucy

Leeds, UK

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#13
Dec 1, 2009
 
Amy wrote:
im 16 and have to have both hips replaced due to steroids when i was diognosed with leukaemia... i am in remission now and doing good but this op has made things harder... its gettin soon to the time and im freaking out about what i can and cannot do... meaning.. mucking around with friends, sitting down on the ground, having a bath, and normal kid things.. i want to know exactly what my life will hold as im worried ill be boring and not as fun as i used to because im restricted to do what others can... can someone plz explain what life is like for them and whether or not your able to do anything, im really scared..
I'm in exactly the same situation as you, have you had your replacements? Will I be ok?:/
Nan Davis Phoenix Az

Charlotte, NC

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#14
Dec 18, 2009
 
I was born with congenital bilateral hip dysplasia. Wore leg braces until I was 4, had a procedure done to the left hip on my 11 brithday. It was not a replacement as it was 1965 but I went one to spend a lifetime of riding horses (even got to 2nd level dressage), scuba diving, hiking and it wasn't until I turned 50 that I started to have problems with the right hip, so replaced it July 07, was walking without a cane by Sept 07 and back to work fulltime. November 07 I was back riding my horses (I have 4) however, the healing process really aggrevated the left hip with brusitis, needed some steriod shots, but 2010 am planning to change that one out too. I am investigating the anterior approach this time, as the healing process is shorter. Best thing I ever did and only wish I had done it sooner.
cher

Sterling Heights, MI

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#15
Jan 4, 2010
 
sheila wrote:
I am 58 yrs old i have to have a hip replace ment and i am also worried that i wont be able to walk without a stick, and that i will always have to have a raised toilet seat also will i be able to have a bath without special seats i just want to be able to do things that we all take for granted , iam lucky that i will be getting lots of help from my family i just don't like change .
I am 55 yrs old and just had the left hip replaced Nov 10 2009. 3 days hospital. 5th day home climb my steps and showered. Felt great. The first week you need help getting in and out of bed. First week uncomfortable. I didn't take pain pills as perscribed. 2nd week much easier to get around. I was driving by the 4th week. Showing houses (I'm a realtor) but do what they tell you in home therapy and especially out patient therapy. Push a little harder with the therapy and you'll be shocked how fast the recovery and how great you feel. I still go to therapy 3 times a week. This week I went cane free. Good Luck and don't be scared. The relief from the pain is well worth the surgery.
carol p

Bend, OR

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#16
Jan 8, 2010
 
Well I think after 5 years of being in pain in my right hip I am scheduling a THR. I have worked in one form of medicine or another for over 30 years. I will be 57 this May, but most people guess my age some 20 years younger. I have a lot of horses which I drive and ride. I am also my own farrier, which causes me extreme pain. This is the primary reason I have made the decision. My doc feels I will be able to work (I stand all the time at work) by 4 weeks, but wants me to take 6 off. From the sounds of people on this forum most are not able to go without assistance of some form of support, ie, cane, walker (cringe) for long after that. Has anyone been up at at em before 6 weeks without a walking device? I am terrified, and also what is the difference between the anterior vs posterior?
Thanks,
Carol
gmk

Erie, PA

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#17
Jan 9, 2010
 
carol p wrote:
Well I think after 5 years of being in pain in my right hip I am scheduling a THR. I have worked in one form of medicine or another for over 30 years. I will be 57 this May, but most people guess my age some 20 years younger. I have a lot of horses which I drive and ride. I am also my own farrier, which causes me extreme pain. This is the primary reason I have made the decision. My doc feels I will be able to work (I stand all the time at work) by 4 weeks, but wants me to take 6 off. From the sounds of people on this forum most are not able to go without assistance of some form of support, ie, cane, walker (cringe) for long after that. Has anyone been up at at em before 6 weeks without a walking device? I am terrified, and also what is the difference between the anterior vs posterior?
Thanks,
Carol
Hi Carol,
I'm 53, had minimally invasive THR and was able to walk unassisted after about 7-10 days although I did use the cane when out of the house due to a limp. Back to work in four weeks and found it necessary to stay with PT and at-home exercises in order to improve daily. I'm four months post op and continue with the stretches and exercises to strengthen thigh muscles. Let me know if you have any specific concerns. Best of luck to you!
carol p

Bend, OR

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#18
Jan 9, 2010
 
gmk,

I am fairly athletic and used to run about 4 days a week for many years to keep in shape. Now I can barely walk, worse over the last 8 months, but was told in '04 my hip was going out. I drive a 6-up of draft horses and really am normally very active. I do a lot of exercises at home now, so maybe with the at home PT I may be okay.

When back to work did you stand most of the time, or sit?

Did you have the anterior, or posterior surgery.

I have been told my surgeon does a very small, state of the art, new
style incision that minimizes muscle damage.

Were you using a cane when you returned to work. I would hope I would not have to do this if at all possible. Thx. C
gmk

Erie, PA

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#19
Jan 10, 2010
 
carol p wrote:
gmk,
I am fairly athletic and used to run about 4 days a week for many years to keep in shape. Now I can barely walk, worse over the last 8 months, but was told in '04 my hip was going out. I drive a 6-up of draft horses and really am normally very active. I do a lot of exercises at home now, so maybe with the at home PT I may be okay.
When back to work did you stand most of the time, or sit?
Did you have the anterior, or posterior surgery.
I have been told my surgeon does a very small, state of the art, new
style incision that minimizes muscle damage.
Were you using a cane when you returned to work. I would hope I would not have to do this if at all possible. Thx. C


I did a lot of excercies at home prior to surgery as well & it's helped. I really used the cane rarely but when I did use it, it wasn't for my hip as much as for my leg - damaged my IT band due to the unsteady walking/limp. The minimally invasive surgery I had involved two small incisions, one front & one back, with no muscle cut. From what my surgeon said, he only does this on younger patients who are not overweight. When I returned to work I was 'cane free' but my position does not require me being on my feet very much. I did, and still do, get up and walk around every couple hours so I don't stiffen up. Being active will really help you in the long run; the sooner you're up and moving, the better you will feel! When's your surgery scheduled? Ginger
carol p

Bend, OR

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#20
Jan 10, 2010
 
The 10th of February, just 1 month away. I am up the whole time I work. I am not a good sitter. I am not overweight for my height, but not the weight I was when I was running and able to move freely without pain. I am just a little bit overweight. I use my elliptical machine often, but pay for it with not being able to sleep. So, I am finally looking forward to being pain free. I will try to continue to exercise, but most everything I do is extremely painful. I have a lot of horses to trim before the surgery so they are not too bad when I can tend to them again. We are working on a different method for me to accomplish this task without having to hold their feet. Most of them weight over 1700lbs, but none of them really lean on me.

Thanks for your info. It is reassuring that I may not need a device when I return to work, as it would not workout well at all. Is your IT (iliotibial) band better?

C

C

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