Woman Reverses Diabetes Diagnosis With Lifestyle Change

Full story: NBC29 Charlottesville

A Charlottesville woman is proving that being diagnosed with a disease or disorder does not necessarily mean a lifetime of medication.
Comments
1 - 16 of 16 Comments Last updated Apr 18, 2013
Diabetic Also

Charlottesville, VA

#1 Apr 15, 2013
You have definitely inspired me!! Going to start today, faith believing I can do this too!!
Frank Ernest

Staunton, VA

#2 Apr 15, 2013
Most doctors will not tell you stuff like this.Nowadays most doctors are merely pill salesmen and don't really care about your health as long as they can keep writing scripts.
Disillusioned

Charlottesville, VA

#3 Apr 15, 2013
Congratulations! Great job -- keep up the good work.
You Can Bank On It

Waynesboro, VA

#4 Apr 15, 2013
Congrats! I absolutely love the positive outcome and wish you the best of fortune.
Type1

Charlottesville, VA

#5 Apr 15, 2013
It is important to note that this kind of lifestyle change, while healthy for all, can only "cure" a Type 2 diabetic. Type 1 diabetes is a different disease and requires the use of insulin for management, regardless of one's lifestyle.
pilgrim

Charlottesville, VA

#6 Apr 15, 2013
This is great news for all people. Food is a drug, use it wisely. As a family nurse practitioner and diabetes educator, I have incorporated holistic health counseling into my practice for over 15 years with amazing results for the people who have applied the principles to their daily life. If you can do this on your own...Great! For those who need extra coaching, I am currently starting a holistic health counseling practice in Charlotteville. To our collective joy & health....Pamela
More info

Charlottesville, VA

#7 Apr 15, 2013
pilgrim wrote:
This is great news for all people. Food is a drug, use it wisely. As a family nurse practitioner and diabetes educator, I have incorporated holistic health counseling into my practice for over 15 years with amazing results for the people who have applied the principles to their daily life. If you can do this on your own...Great! For those who need extra coaching, I am currently starting a holistic health counseling practice in Charlotteville. To our collective joy & health....Pamela
Hi, how do we get more information on this ??!!
Harry

Charlottesville, VA

#8 Apr 16, 2013
WOW....watch the video, she went from looking 40 to looking 20 !!!
Annes

New York, NY

#9 Apr 16, 2013
The diabetes drug-makers have been running the game of billion dollar profits and the people have fallen for it. The FDA is the silent partner in the game.

The Actos drugs makers profited 20 billion dollars in 5 years, then they found the drug causes bladder cancer.

The Avandia drug makers profited 25 Billion in 5 years and the drug was banned for deaths from heart attack.

There is no one who needs a drug for type 2 diabetes diabetes, the drug makers know this but the FDA still approves these drugs. They are now targeting the children

just google SPIRIT HAPPY DIET
Dr Truth

Charlottesville, VA

#10 Apr 16, 2013
Annes wrote:
The diabetes drug-makers have been running the game of billion dollar profits and the people have fallen for it. The FDA is the silent partner in the game.
The Actos drugs makers profited 20 billion dollars in 5 years, then they found the drug causes bladder cancer.
The Avandia drug makers profited 25 Billion in 5 years and the drug was banned for deaths from heart attack.
There is no one who needs a drug for type 2 diabetes diabetes, the drug makers know this but the FDA still approves these drugs. They are now targeting the children
just google SPIRIT HAPPY DIET
YOU hit it right on the head when you said "there is no one who needs a drug for type 2 diabetes" !!! THE treatment is, EAT LESS~move ore!!! TYPE 2 in time, CAN BE REVERSED!!! EAT LESS...MOVE MORE!!!

Since: Apr 13

Location hidden

#11 Apr 17, 2013
As a medical student, Frank A. Clark, MD, was one of the few African-American men in his class. It wasn't that he saw black men being rejected from medical school. The bigger problem was that he didn't see many on track to get there at all.

“Even during my collegiate career, I was a biology major with a minor in chemistry, and I didn't see many other African-American males on the premed route,” says Dr. Clark, now a psychiatry resident at Palmetto Richland Memorial Hospital in Columbia, S.C.

Black men are notable in that their numbers are lagging even as other minorities and women are continuing a long-term trend of gaining greater representation among medical school applicants and students, according to the most recent Assn. of American Medical Colleges report on medical education diversity.

The report said 2.5% of medical school applicants were black men in 2011, a drop from 2.6% in 2002. That compares with 9% and 11% increases in the share of Asian and Hispanic male applicants, respectively, during the same period. A 10% greater share of matriculating students were Asian men in 2011 than in 2002, and Hispanic men made up a 24% larger proportion of new medical students. The share of white male applicants and matriculants was stable.

Growth in the number of African-American women applying for — and attending — medical school has been comparatively weak as well, with their representation, as a percentage of all applicants and graduates, also in decline. However, their numbers are still enough to create, as they have for some time, the biggest gender gap among all racial or ethnic groups.

Twice as many African-American women as men applied to medical school, and black women accounted for nearly two-thirds of black students who were accepted and eventually matriculated. That disparity translates into graduation rates, with 63% of new black MDs in 2011 being women.

By comparison, the non-Hispanic white gender gap in favor of men is 55%-45%, and while most other racial and ethnic groups skew female, they don't come near the African-American gender gap. Overall, according to AAMC, the male-female gap in applicants and matriculants in 2011 was 53%-47% favoring men, a near-historic low ratio that has held steady for the past few years.

The AAMC report said the “persistent” problem of black male underrepresentation among medical school applicants speaks to a need for medical schools, which have stepped up minority recruitment efforts in recent years to try to get their student bodies to reflect the American population,“to institute plans and initiatives aimed at strengthening the pipeline.” Efforts include attempts to interest more black male youth in medicine and hiring more faculty members “from racially and ethnically underrepresented groups.”

“We have a major, major problem in this country,” said Marc Nivet, EdD, the AAMC's chief diversity officer.“There is just simply an enormous amount of indisputable evidence that we're not intervening as effectively as we'd like as a society to increase the talent pool of African-Americans who are capable of taking advantage of the science curricula available up and down the pipeline.”

Despite a 3% rise in the total number of male African-American medical school graduates during the last decade, the proportion of new doctors who were black men fell from 2.6% in 2002 to 2.4% in 2011. African-Americans account for 13% of the U.S. population, but only 6% of 2011 matriculants were black, as are just 4% of practicing doctors. And while the Census Bureau reports that 10% of U.S. men 30 and older are African-American, less than 3% of practicing doctors are black men, according to American Medical Association data.
Dr Evan Morris

Charlottesville, VA

#12 Apr 17, 2013
hnsmith wrote:
As a medical student, Frank A. Clark, MD, was one of the few African-American men in his class. It wasn't that he saw black men being rejected from medical school. The bigger problem was that he didn't see many on track to get there at all.
“Even during my collegiate career, I was a biology major with a minor in chemistry, and I didn't see many other African-American males on the premed route,” says Dr. Clark, now a psychiatry resident at Palmetto Richland Memorial Hospital in Columbia, S.C.
Black men are notable in that their numbers are lagging even as other minorities and women are continuing a long-term trend of gaining greater representation among medical school applicants and students, according to the most recent Assn. of American Medical Colleges report on medical education diversity.
The report said 2.5% of medical school applicants were black men in 2011, a drop from 2.6% in 2002. That compares with 9% and 11% increases in the share of Asian and Hispanic male applicants, respectively, during the same period. A 10% greater share of matriculating students were Asian men in 2011 than in 2002, and Hispanic men made up a 24% larger proportion of new medical students. The share of white male applicants and matriculants was stable.
Growth in the number of African-American women applying for — and attending — medical school has been comparatively weak as well, with their representation, as a percentage of all applicants and graduates, also in decline. However, their numbers are still enough to create, as they have for some time, the biggest gender gap among all racial or ethnic groups.
Twice as many African-American women as men applied to medical school, and black women accounted for nearly two-thirds of black students who were accepted and eventually matriculated. That disparity translates into graduation rates, with 63% of new black MDs in 2011 being women.
By comparison, the non-Hispanic white gender gap in favor of men is 55%-45%, and while most other racial and ethnic groups skew female, they don't come near the African-American gender gap. Overall, according to AAMC, the male-female gap in applicants and matriculants in 2011 was 53%-47% favoring men, a near-historic low ratio that has held steady for the past few years.
The AAMC report said the “persistent” problem of black male underrepresentation among medical school applicants speaks to a need for medical schools, which have stepped up minority recruitment efforts in recent years to try to get their student bodies to reflect the American population,“to institute plans and initiatives aimed at strengthening the pipeline.” Efforts include attempts to interest more black male youth in medicine and hiring more faculty members “from racially and ethnically underrepresented groups.”
“We have a major, major problem in this country,” said Marc Nivet, EdD, the AAMC's chief diversity officer.“There is just simply an enormous amount of indisputable evidence that we're not intervening as effectively as we'd like as a society to increase the talent pool of African-Americans who are capable of taking advantage of the science curricula available up and down the pipeline.”
Despite a 3% rise in the total number of male African-American medical school graduates during the last decade, the proportion of new doctors who were black men fell from 2.6% in 2002 to 2.4% in 2011. African-Americans account for 13% of the U.S. population, but only 6% of 2011 matriculants were black, as are just 4% of practicing doctors. And while the Census Bureau reports that 10% of U.S. men 30 and older are African-American, less than 3% of practicing doctors are black men, according to American Medical Association data.
~~~what the hell you talking aout??
somy024

Bangalore, India

#13 Apr 17, 2013
Ya changing your lifestyle keeps u fit through out your life, getting up early in the morning, drinking lots of water, eating more natural foods keeps your body active & fresh,vegetables resemble most of the organs in our body, for example, bitter gourd resembles pancreas- the gland that produces insulin, so thats good for diabetes patiens.. & so on
Anonymous

Iligan City, Philippines

#14 Apr 17, 2013
Its awe-inspiring. Such discipline and perseverance
CvilleMechEngr

Charlottesville, VA

#15 Apr 17, 2013
somy024 wrote:
Ya changing your lifestyle keeps u fit through out your life, getting up early in the morning, drinking lots of water, eating more natural foods keeps your body active & fresh,vegetables resemble most of the organs in our body, for example, bitter gourd resembles pancreas- the gland that produces insulin, so thats good for diabetes patiens.. & so on
What happens if you go on a diet of big zuchinis? Is that good for anything?
somy024

Bangalore, India

#16 Apr 18, 2013
CvilleMechEngr wrote:
<quoted text>
What happens if you go on a diet of big zuchinis? Is that good for anything?
ya zuchinis has more water content in it, if it can be eaten like a cucumber along with the skin which is rich in fibre, its good for diabeties. It reduces cholesterol,& almost replaces tablets like B-complex.., its highly rich in vitamins & minerals etc

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