Study Counters Warnings on Quit-Smoking Drug

Oct 3, 2009 | Posted by: roboblogger | Full story: Mental Help Net

The smoking cessation drug varenicline does not increase the risk for self-harm or depression, according to a new British study.

Comments (Page 4)

Showing posts 61 - 80 of86
|
Go to last page| Jump to page:

“KISS THIS SMOKERS BUTT”

Since: Jun 08

Location hidden

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#61
Oct 17, 2009
 
Musician wrote:
<quoted text>
Does this organization oversee school drivers that transport our children?
If not, is there a ban on school bus drivers using Chanitx, too?
OMG, hope teachers are not on that stuff..lokk wo owns Chantix and the new anti smoking injections and did donate to the smoking bans

the largest criminal fine ever imposed in the U.S.
Oct. 17 (Bloomberg)-- A unit of Pfizer Inc., the world’s largest drugmaker, was sentenced to pay $1.3 billion in penalties for misbranding medicines, including the largest criminal fine ever imposed in the U.S.

U.S. District Judge Douglas Woodlock in Boston ordered Pfizer’s Pharmacia & Upjohn unit to pay a $1.2 billion criminal fine and forfeit $105 million, Acting U.S. Attorney Michael Loucks said in a statement.

The fine, over sales practices for a painkiller since pulled from the market, is the biggest piece of a record $2.3 billion settlement announced last month between the U.S. Justice Department and New York-based Pfizer. The deal includes $1 billion in civil penalties, the largest non-criminal fraud case against a drugmaker, the Justice Department said.

The criminal case revolved around allegations that the painkiller Bextra and three other medicines were promoted for uses other than those approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The government, which pays for medicines through several health programs, started a criminal probe after private whistleblowers filed lawsuits in three states.

The four-year investigation uncovered a range of practices, including kickback payments to doctors in the sale of nine other drugs, among them the impotence drug Viagra and cholesterol pill Lipitor, officials said.

Pfizer, which had $48.3 billion in revenue last year, reported in January that it took a fourth-quarter charge of $2.3 billion to cover the preliminary agreement. The company has said it would have no additional charges from the case.

“Today’s hearing is the last step in a process to bring final closure to the settlement agreement with the U.S. Department of Justice that was announced on Sept. 2, 2009,” the New York-based company said yesterday in a statement.

Pfizer gained 11 cents to $17.77 in New York Stock Exchange composite trading. The shares have risen 5.1 percent over the past year.

The lead civil case is Collins v. Pfizer Inc., 04-11780, U.S. District Court, District of Massachusetts (Boston).

To contact the reporters responsible for this story: Cary O’Reilly in Washington at caryoreilly@bloomberg.net
Last Updated: October 17, 2009 00:01 EDT

Since: Mar 07

Location hidden

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#62
Oct 17, 2009
 
That's pretty funny about Pfizer.
Makes the necessity for the Sherman Anti Trust laws pale in comparison.

I know just about every doc tries to push that Lipitor on everyone.

My Mom threw hers out. Said it made her joints ache like crazy, she's not arthritic and asked for an alternative medicine.

Still I think this high cholesterol thing is overly monitored. Had a friend on it and it did not bring it down much at all.

They try to hand these drugs out and antidepressants like candy.

Glad the whistle is being blown on these Dr. Feelgoods.

“KISS THIS SMOKERS BUTT”

Since: Jun 08

Location hidden

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#63
Oct 17, 2009
 
Musician wrote:
That's pretty funny about Pfizer.
Makes the necessity for the Sherman Anti Trust laws pale in comparison.
I know just about every doc tries to push that Lipitor on everyone.
My Mom threw hers out. Said it made her joints ache like crazy, she's not arthritic and asked for an alternative medicine.
Still I think this high cholesterol thing is overly monitored. Had a friend on it and it did not bring it down much at all.
They try to hand these drugs out and antidepressants like candy.
Glad the whistle is being blown on these Dr. Feelgoods.
the whistle blowers get a cut of the fines, good,they deserve it for their public service
Mazed

Nashville, TN

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#64
Oct 21, 2009
 

Judged:

1

Musician wrote:
<quoted text>
Your post makes little to no sense.
You said that the fact that drivers and pilots were advised not to perform those functions while taking Chantix was all that needed to be said. You then dragged in a huge amount of statements having NOTHING to do with that simple admonition and attacked me for questioning the all-inclusiveness of the original statement. And you say MY post made no sense?

Get a mind.
Musician wrote:
<quoted text>But you are one of the antismoking "professionals" and it is meant to deceive and confuse.
Lies may get you somewhere (look what it did for the tobacco CEOs), but are not justified. You flatter yourself that a professional would squander time on your feeble gobbledegook.

“Just Say No to Smoking Bans”

Since: Jul 07

Location hidden

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#65
Oct 21, 2009
 

Judged:

1

1

If you want to talk gobbledegook, look no further than the recent lie about smoking bans and heart attacks. Doctors who commit fraud and the media who spreads the lies need to be locked up in a smoking allowed cell.

Conclusion of IOM Report on Smoking Bans and Heart Attacks is Invalid on its Face: An Epidemiologic Analysis of the Report's Major Conclusion
Last week, an Institute of Medicine (IOM) committee released a report whose major conclusion was that smoking bans have a significant short-term effect on heart attacks, reducing the incidence of acute coronary event admissions to hospitals due in part to reduced secondhand smoke exposure. The press release headline read: "Smoking bans reduce the risk of heart attacks associated with secondhand smoke."

Although the report's conclusions have received widespread publicity, a little-noticed but severe flaw in the basic epidemiology/biostatistics foundation of the report renders its conclusion invalid.
www.tobaccoanalsis.blogspot.com

Since: Mar 07

Location hidden

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#66
Oct 21, 2009
 
Dr. Michael Siegel.

Promotes reasonable discussion.
Ostracized by fanatical anti organizations.

For obvious reasons.
Mazed

Nashville, TN

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#67
Oct 21, 2009
 

Judged:

4

4

3

Sheri wrote:
If you want to talk gobbledegook, look no further than the recent lie about smoking bans and heart attacks. Doctors who commit fraud and the media who spreads the lies need to be locked up in a smoking allowed cell.
There it is at last. You obviously regard the smoking as punishment to those exposed. You've been deliberately defrauding us regarding your own belief. You are a liar. QED.

“Just Say No to Smoking Bans”

Since: Jul 07

Location hidden

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#68
Oct 22, 2009
 

Judged:

2

2

2

Mazed wrote:
<quoted text>
There it is at last. You obviously regard the smoking as punishment to those exposed. You've been deliberately defrauding us regarding your own belief. You are a liar. QED.
ROFLMAO The most effective punishment is to inflict what is most frightening upon the criminal. In this case, that would be smoking for anti-smoking prisoners. That's what they did in the prophetic novel, 1984, the book upon which the anti-smoking movement is based.
Mazed

Nashville, TN

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#69
Oct 23, 2009
 

Judged:

1

1

Ah, then smokers who violate smoking regulations should be forced to go cold turkey and face withdrawals.

Okay, time for someone who has no experience of it to trot out the claim that withdrawals hold no terror and she just "likes smoking" too much to quit. Denial 101. And 203, come to that.

It never changes, but addicts always think it's news.

“Just Say No to Smoking Bans”

Since: Jul 07

Location hidden

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#70
Oct 23, 2009
 

Judged:

1

1

Mazed wrote:
Ah, then smokers who violate smoking regulations should be forced to go cold turkey and face withdrawals.
Okay, time for someone who has no experience of it to trot out the claim that withdrawals hold no terror and she just "likes smoking" too much to quit. Denial 101. And 203, come to that.
It never changes, but addicts always think it's news.
Your comical overuse of the word addict has resulted in loss of meaning for that word. WHere once the use of addict would invoke pictures of track marks and dark alley violent crimes, now the word has come to mean doing something that you enjoy and habitually do. Language is powerful. Overuse of words makes them trite.

Since: Mar 07

Location hidden

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#71
Oct 23, 2009
 
Sheri wrote:
<quoted text>
Your comical overuse of the word addict has resulted in loss of meaning for that word. WHere once the use of addict would invoke pictures of track marks and dark alley violent crimes, now the word has come to mean doing something that you enjoy and habitually do. Language is powerful. Overuse of words makes them trite.
You are "overwhelmingly" correct.
Sez Who

Cincinnati, OH

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#72
Oct 23, 2009
 
Sheri wrote:
<quoted text>
Your comical overuse of the word addict has resulted in loss of meaning for that word. WHere once the use of addict would invoke pictures of track marks and dark alley violent crimes...
Sounds like your ideas about addiction came from the movies of 1950s. Why not ask those who know about drug addiction, the National Institute on Drug Abuse?

http://www.nida.nih.gov/ResearchReports/Nicot...

"Tobacco Addiction

Is Nicotine Addictive?

Yes. Most smokers use tobacco regularly because they are addicted to nicotine. Addiction is characterized by compulsive drug seeking and abuse, even in the face of negative health consequences. It is well documented that most smokers identify tobacco use as harmful and express a desire to reduce or stop using it, and nearly 35 million of them want to quit each year. Unfortunately, more than 85 percent of those who try to quit on their own relapse, most within a week."

“Just Say No to Smoking Bans”

Since: Jul 07

Location hidden

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#73
Oct 23, 2009
 

Judged:

1

Sez Who wrote:
<quoted text>
Sounds like your ideas about addiction came from the movies of 1950s. Why not ask those who know about drug addiction, the National Institute on Drug Abuse?
http://www.nida.nih.gov/ResearchReports/Nicot...
"Tobacco Addiction
Is Nicotine Addictive?
Yes. Most smokers use tobacco regularly because they are addicted to nicotine. Addiction is characterized by compulsive drug seeking and abuse, even in the face of negative health consequences. It is well documented that most smokers identify tobacco use as harmful and express a desire to reduce or stop using it, and nearly 35 million of them want to quit each year. Unfortunately, more than 85 percent of those who try to quit on their own relapse, most within a week."
My reaction to that is who the F cares! If you enjoy using the term addict to describe smokers, then be my guest. My point was that its shock value and its effect on the person you are trying to shock is lost because of the word's overruse. Some serious practitioners in the addiction field agree that we have diluted the message and that it interferes with the addict's perception of his problem and therefore with his treatment.
Freedom

Niles, MI

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#74
Oct 23, 2009
 
Sez Who wrote:
<quoted text>
Sounds like your ideas about addiction came from the movies of 1950s. Why not ask those who know about drug addiction, the National Institute on Drug Abuse?
http://www.nida.nih.gov/ResearchReports/Nicot...
"Tobacco Addiction
Is Nicotine Addictive?
Yes. Most smokers use tobacco regularly because they are addicted to nicotine. Addiction is characterized by compulsive drug seeking and abuse, even in the face of negative health consequences. It is well documented that most smokers identify tobacco use as harmful and express a desire to reduce or stop using it, and nearly 35 million of them want to quit each year. Unfortunately, more than 85 percent of those who try to quit on their own relapse, most within a week."
Seems there are those who are addicted to control...eh?

Those who are afflicted with such an addiction always need a scapegoat.

There is help out there for you.

http://www.ec-online.net/Knowledge/articles/c...
Mazed

Nashville, TN

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#75
Oct 26, 2009
 

Judged:

1

1

1

Sheri wrote:
<quoted text>
My reaction to that is who the F cares! If you enjoy using the term addict to describe smokers, then be my guest. My point was that its shock value and its effect on the person you are trying to shock is lost because of the word's overruse.
"Overruse"--as in you pretend too much that it is not addictive or that you are not an addict? Too much of THAT ruse?

You have no justification for the assumption that I am using the term for any purpose other than accuracy. It IS the appropriate word for the meaning I wish to convey. Smoking is ubiquitous in our society. By extension, addiction is ubiquitous in our society.

If familiarity has destroyed the shock value in anything, it has destroyed the shock value of indulgence in the totally destructive and utterly ridiculous habit of self-importantly sucking in fumes from portable, highly toxic leaf fires and spewing those fumes into the air where others must breathe it.

That sort of activity should truly shock anyone with a lick of sense.

No, "addict" is simply the right word. I suppose I could mix it up some with "nicotine dependence". It would add variety, but it would be less efficient.

“Just Say No to Smoking Bans”

Since: Jul 07

Location hidden

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#76
Oct 26, 2009
 
Mazed wrote:
<quoted text>
"Overruse"--as in you pretend too much that it is not addictive or that you are not an addict? Too much of THAT ruse?
You have no justification for the assumption that I am using the term for any purpose other than accuracy. It IS the appropriate word for the meaning I wish to convey. Smoking is ubiquitous in our society. By extension, addiction is ubiquitous in our society.
If familiarity has destroyed the shock value in anything, it has destroyed the shock value of indulgence in the totally destructive and utterly ridiculous habit of self-importantly sucking in fumes from portable, highly toxic leaf fires and spewing those fumes into the air where others must breathe it.
That sort of activity should truly shock anyone with a lick of sense.
No, "addict" is simply the right word. I suppose I could mix it up some with "nicotine dependence". It would add variety, but it would be less efficient.
Sorry for the typo on overuse, and thanks for pointing it out. I hate when I do that. As for calling me an addict, as I said before, be my guest. I simply don't care about what you think. It does not affect me in any way, so go for it.

“KISS THIS SMOKERS BUTT”

Since: Jun 08

Location hidden

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#77
Oct 26, 2009
 
Sez Who wrote:
<quoted text>

Is Nicotine Addictive?
I certainly hope so, I prefer all of the non narcotic products that I choose to use, consume and wear to be enjoyable enough for me to repeat over and over. It would be a total waste of money on things we don't enjoy..thanks for equating enjoyment with addiction, you should try it sometime. No addictions is boring

“KISS THIS SMOKERS BUTT”

Since: Jun 08

Location hidden

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#78
Oct 26, 2009
 
Sheri wrote:
<quoted text>
Sorry for the typo on overuse, and thanks for pointing it out. I hate when I do that. As for calling me an addict, as I said before, be my guest. I simply don't care about what you think. It does not affect me in any way, so go for it.
what fun thing do you think would top the list of great addictions..sex maybe?
Sez Who

Cincinnati, OH

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#79
Oct 26, 2009
 

Judged:

1

Sheri wrote:
<quoted text>
My reaction to that is who the F cares! If you enjoy using the term addict to describe smokers, then be my guest.
Sheri, you & Freedom both seem to want to personalize everything. It's not MY opinion that nicotine is addictive. I am not qualified to make that determination. That's why I looked to see what the National Institute on Drug Abuse would say, because that is their area of expertise.

By the way, "addict" is not a disparaging word, it's a clinical term. If someone called you "junkie" or a "nicotine fiend" you would be right to take offense, because those are insulting ways of referring to addiction. You might not like that the term "addict" is being used to describe you, but it is not an insult.

“Just Say No to Smoking Bans”

Since: Jul 07

Location hidden

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#80
Oct 26, 2009
 

Judged:

1

Sez Who wrote:
<quoted text>
Sheri, you & Freedom both seem to want to personalize everything. It's not MY opinion that nicotine is addictive. I am not qualified to make that determination. That's why I looked to see what the National Institute on Drug Abuse would say, because that is their area of expertise.
By the way, "addict" is not a disparaging word, it's a clinical term. If someone called you "junkie" or a "nicotine fiend" you would be right to take offense, because those are insulting ways of referring to addiction. You might not like that the term "addict" is being used to describe you, but it is not an insult.
I shall wear it with pride then. Anything that distinguishes me from anti-smokers is something to cherish.

Tell me when this thread is updated: (Registration is not required)

Add to my Tracker Send me an email

Showing posts 61 - 80 of86
|
Go to last page| Jump to page:
Type in your comments below
Name
(appears on your post)
Comments
Characters left: 4000
Type the numbers you see in the image on the right:

Please note by clicking on "Post Comment" you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

•••
•••
Enter and win $5000
•••
•••