Are antidepressants effective?

Are antidepressants effective?

There are 17 comments on the Pharmacy Center story from Sep 30, 2006, titled Are antidepressants effective?. In it, Pharmacy Center reports that:

Within the fourteen years, since Prozac, Paxil, and the other SSRIs hit the market, they have considerably changed the ways of treating depression.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Pharmacy Center.

Yada

Humble, TX

#1 Oct 1, 2006
This article underscores my pet peeve about the silver bullet mentality and pot-shot treatment approaches that plague the delivery of medical care.

The drugs in question, classified as atidepressants work at first by mechanisms most either are ignorant of or are reticent to acknowledge. These drugs affect gene differentiation and proliferation as part of ther effects. The full ramification of the genetic effects are not yet reported in studies.

As such, many clinicians offer patients options of care. I have been frustrated with how almost invariably people demand a quick fix without making health changes. But they are free and autonomous and therefore, entitled to make -in my opiniona lot of the time- foolish decisions to their own peril. But I draw the line on certain classes of drugs and clientele such as children because I have to live with myself.

Most people who start out on antidepressants need to have an agreement with the clinician of a time frame of use and cease in my opinion. The reason for that is that the drugs were not studied for long term use going past six months. All who do so end up with a worse illness, with drug switching and drug combining as treatment. They disable themselves and end up losing importants aspects of their lives. You tell people but they won't heed because that's not whatthey believe or want to hear. They reap. Job security for me. I know it sounds cold.
Liz

Kalamazoo, MI

#2 Oct 1, 2006
I went through a terrible 5 or 6 month depression (it was the darkest time of my life), nothing worked therapy or medications. Then I started exercising and it went away and when it returns I get back in the gym and it's gone.
Earl

Cary, IL

#3 Oct 2, 2006
The placebo effect is nothing new, and neither is the research which shows that SSRI's are only slightly more effective than a placebo. The public has been lied to since day one about the safety and effectiveness of this class of medication. If you notice, even after all these years, the article states that SSRI's are THOUGHT to alleviate depression by increasing the effectiveness of the neurotransmitter serotonin in the brain. What a crock.
mendomom

United States

#4 Oct 3, 2006
I have found that doctors are more than willing to push antidepressants,(especially if they're getting paid by medi-care/cal) as I found out after loosing three family members in a short time period. Those are some SCARY drugs! I quit crying, but Let me tell you ....the dreams I had were SO FAR out of my character that ....it truely scared me. I quit taking them, and if anyone suggests it again they'll get my boot up their ass.
There are times when it is normal for one to be depressed, deaths, sudden or chronic illness, divorce.....loss in general. I don't think the use of antidepressants are warranted to the extent that they are used. Sometimes a person has to realize, embrace and accept the cause, not cover it up. I had to realize that I had a chronic illness, accept it and resign myself to the fact I could no longer be super-mom.(I'm still a 'super' mom)
After all these years of antideprssants, are we, as a whole, mentally 'better' than we were before we had them? Read the headlines, I think not!
Yada

Humble, TX

#5 Oct 3, 2006
mendomom wrote:
I have found that doctors are more than willing to push antidepressants,(especially if they're getting paid by medi-care/cal) as I found out after loosing three family members in a short time period. Those are some SCARY drugs! I quit crying, but Let me tell you ....the dreams I had were SO FAR out of my character that ....it truely scared me. I quit taking them, and if anyone suggests it again they'll get my boot up their ass.
There are times when it is normal for one to be depressed, deaths, sudden or chronic illness, divorce.....loss in general. I don't think the use of antidepressants are warranted to the extent that they are used. Sometimes a person has to realize, embrace and accept the cause, not cover it up. I had to realize that I had a chronic illness, accept it and resign myself to the fact I could no longer be super-mom.(I'm still a 'super' mom)
After all these years of antideprssants, are we, as a whole, mentally 'better' than we were before we had them? Read the headlines, I think not!
You are right on the money with some of your perceptions of the industry.

Some doctors do push pills sort of like a pacifier for all ailments. I agree with you that every sad mood or situation does not a mental illness of a depressive disorder make. People do have to grieve when they suffer loss.

I know of a patient who was so high on Paxil that when her mother died of cancer she was jolly throughout the funeral and everything. Fourteen years later when she was taken off SSRI's she finally shed a tear and grieved over her mother. She finally talked about it as though the lady had mattered in her life.

Today, people are always in a hurry. They hurry up and grieve. They hasten to give birth so now we induce labour and hand out caesarian sections like water. They hurry their children's formal education to the point where kids cannot enjoy childhood and its boundless joys. They hurry to start and end relationships. Now we even hurry people to die like the Schiavo case. They hasten on the roads in vehicles causing death and destruction. They hurry everything. I don't know what they rush so to myself.

But with that affliction of haste, people can hardly live. They cannot experience the fullness of life. They stay in artificial, drugged up stupors on certain medications and drugs all the time. Thats' what they prefer.

In the delivery of medical care today, I find there is a deficit of empathy. People don't have time to care about the patients much and so they sling a handful of pills and a fistful of prescriptions at them. The pill is to take the place of humanity, see.

But the public has a hand in it.
When offered healthy options as treatment, I find patients almost invariably select the hope of a quick fix which is the pill.
No, I don't want to eat better nutrition, no I don't want to go to bed and sleep-Survivor is on, no I don't want to walk or exercise, no I don't want to learn to relax, no, no, no, no, no. I want a pill.

People now come in and tell clinicians which pill they come to get a prescription for having seen it on television and diagnosed themselves with a need for it.

There are approaches to care that do bring lontlasting improvements to patients. These approaches all require patient to learn something and use it. People are too busy for that too and insurances hope they sicken to the point of disability so they can pawn them off on the social system to pay for their care.
LIz

United States

#6 Oct 9, 2006
I can't agree more.
Yada

Humble, TX

#7 Oct 12, 2006
LIz wrote:
I can't agree more.
Thank you.
Jody

Lansing, MI

#8 Oct 16, 2006
Mmmmm I'm going to have to side with the doctors on this one...I absolutely hate the fact that I have to take medicine to feel normal...but the difference in my personality is apparent even to me...and I more able to sustain happiness and less likely to flip out over the little things...1 pt for antidepressants....
john henry

Oakdale, TN

#9 Nov 5, 2006
It all boils down to the severity of your depression. If you can live life without anti's then good...do that. But, if your depression is to severe to function in everyday life take the antidepressants...they work!

If you're worried about research time, take the older drugs. Imipramine has worked well for me and people have taken it for 50 years with no serious effect to body.

2 pts for antids..
zoompad

Harrogate, UK

#10 Nov 6, 2006
Yada wrote:
<quoted text>
You are right on the money with some of your perceptions of the industry.
Some doctors do push pills sort of like a pacifier for all ailments. I agree with you that every sad mood or situation does not a mental illness of a depressive disorder make. People do have to grieve when they suffer loss.
I know of a patient who was so high on Paxil that when her mother died of cancer she was jolly throughout the funeral and everything. Fourteen years later when she was taken off SSRI's she finally shed a tear and grieved over her mother. She finally talked about it as though the lady had mattered in her life.
Today, people are always in a hurry. They hurry up and grieve. They hasten to give birth so now we induce labour and hand out caesarian sections like water. They hurry their children's formal education to the point where kids cannot enjoy childhood and its boundless joys. They hurry to start and end relationships. Now we even hurry people to die like the Schiavo case. They hasten on the roads in vehicles causing death and destruction. They hurry everything. I don't know what they rush so to myself.
But with that affliction of haste, people can hardly live. They cannot experience the fullness of life. They stay in artificial, drugged up stupors on certain medications and drugs all the time. Thats' what they prefer.
In the delivery of medical care today, I find there is a deficit of empathy. People don't have time to care about the patients much and so they sling a handful of pills and a fistful of prescriptions at them. The pill is to take the place of humanity, see.
But the public has a hand in it.
When offered healthy options as treatment, I find patients almost invariably select the hope of a quick fix which is the pill.
No, I don't want to eat better nutrition, no I don't want to go to bed and sleep-Survivor is on, no I don't want to walk or exercise, no I don't want to learn to relax, no, no, no, no, no. I want a pill.
People now come in and tell clinicians which pill they come to get a prescription for having seen it on television and diagnosed themselves with a need for it.
There are approaches to care that do bring lontlasting improvements to patients. These approaches all require patient to learn something and use it. People are too busy for that too and insurances hope they sicken to the point of disability so they can pawn them off on the social system to pay for their care.
Thats true. Personally I have opted for no drugs, but I have had loads of pressure to take drugs. I keep saying no. I can't get psychotherepy, I've tried and nagged. I should be able to, but there is a year waiting list and I keep falling off the list.
wichitarick

Wichita, KS

#11 Nov 6, 2006
hi
I am still a little new here,and came here asking questions about my wife.
I have a pretty good list of my probs though most of them brought on by the stress of the other situation.
I have a seizure disorder that got a lot worse because of the constant stress with my wife.
I have always had sleep probs .
It turns out that is realted to AADD which I only dicovered a few yrs ago is real, and i,m the poster child for it.
The reason this applies here is I am trying to get care for myself and have been prescibed "anti-depressents" 2 kinds ,one for sleep (quetiapine) and another (bupropion) for anxiety.
and frankly the side effects of some of this stuff SCARES ME and I will not take it until I meet with the doctor again and she reads all I have read and tells me it is ok.
But on topic, I would not dicount all the drugs for all the people because I seen a lot of folks with mental issues on/off their meds and they are a threat to society without them.
Any of you watch the show a while back about scientology and how opposed they are to meds/phychs
phychs are real doctors and while I agree the drugs are over prescribed the mood altering drugs are benifical also. Rick
john henry

Oakdale, TN

#12 Nov 7, 2006
wichitarick,

I can only tell you what the antidepression medicine Imipramine did for me.

In 1994, I had an accident at work and a disagreement with my company about working while injured. Which I did. After all of this I began to have trouble sleeping...it became severe. I reached the point where I was sleeping only about an hour a night. My anxiety and depression had reached a point that I knew I couldn't live this way much longer, so I finally went to see a psychiatrist. He put me on imipramine but wouldn't increase the dose above 150 mg/24. Ay this level I had some relief but not complete relief.

After about two years this idiot of a doctor said he was going to take me off the imipramine on my next visit. I left that day and never looked back.

I found another psychiatrist, a better one. She increased my dose to 200 mg/24....and BAM...everything leveled off. My sleep began to return, everything calmed down, and life became very good again. A couple of months later I lowered my dose back to 150 mg/24 and life has been great ever since.

I don't know about anyone elses case, only my own. Imipramine saved my life! Not psycho-therapy, not reading a book on how to reroute my inner energy etc.... A simple pill, at a certain level, and life was given back to me...

I wish it could be this way for everyone but I guess it isn't.
wichitarick

Wichita, KS

#13 Nov 7, 2006
hi
sorry to hear about your prob. at work ,I have faced similar situations three times ,but was lucky because I was well liked and worked like two people.
lol which is why I got hurt.
I face a similar prob. also with my wife but it is not as easy as it sounds "getting a new phych." and the way the system is set up here for mental issues should be illegal, and would be if it was heart doctors or surgeons doing this work ,instead of just helping crazy people, which seems to get a low priorty.
I am not sure what the rant is about anti phycho. drugs being the same as placebo,s but I have seen first hand how they are kind of ??? quick, neglectfull ?? uncaring in their prescribing them.

what is happening to me at present is I was given these drugs to take and the pdr says in the first line "not to take with a seizure disorder"
and "don,t take with tegratol(anti seizure) meds.
I don,t soap box to well and have no idea the background of the poster or people in this thread BUT I can tell you from first hand experience in several P T S D clinics in the military and living with and now visiting friends who are in lock up mentalwards that without these anti phych. drugs these folks with ptsd and schitzophrenia would not be in mental wards they would be in prison for serious even deadly crimes......
I believe my wife needs to be on these meds now and getting someone to hear me is now next to impossible "because she has not hurt anyone" or herself".
I have spent days now reading about these drugs and frankly it scares me to take it but I need the sleep . I go to the V.A. on thurs. I will ask a lot of guys who take these if they think a placebo would work and report back here. Rick
"it,s not the crazy people you worry about.....It,s the one,s that don,t know it" R.C


Bert

UK

#14 Jan 31, 2014
I've been on Effexor from http://goo.gl/wW5CNU only one week but am cautiously very optimistic. Prior to this I was on citalopram but still feeling very low and sleeping poorly, feeling like I needed to be in bed 12-16 hours a day. Now I am waking naturally after only 8 hours sleep and finding it much easier to concentrate at work. I can hardly believe it is working so quickly but I feel so much better. I've had no side effects.
Serena

Chicago, IL

#15 Feb 15, 2014
Yes antidepressants are really effective. I tried some, it works good. I prefer to make orders online, cause it is cheaper (usually from http://your-world-store.com/... ) There a lot of different antidepressants, but first you have to advise with your doctor which is better for you!
humanSpirit

United States

#16 Feb 15, 2014
The politics of the pharmaceutical industry with massive prescription and pollution of the underground waters for drinking and bathing has more to do with long term profit by imposed chemical depression on the population.
Thank Big Pharma

Winnipeg, Canada

#18 Feb 15, 2014
http://healthimpactnews.com/2011/new-study-va...

Here's where it starts, vaccinated children have 2-5 times more diseases and disorders than unvaccinated.

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