New psych manual could create drug windfalls

Jun 5, 2013 | Posted by: roboblogger | Full story: MarketWatch

The changes to the DSM-5, the updated manual of psychiatric illnesses released earlier this month, include 15 new mental disorders .

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1 - 10 of 10 Comments Last updated Jan 31, 2014
HumanSpirit

Middleburg, FL

#1 Jun 5, 2013
That is what the DSM-5 and past addition is about. The Mental Health Industry has no science. Never has.

Psychiatric Diagnosis: Too Little Science, Too Many Conflicts of Interest [i]

Paula J. Caplan, Ph.D.

Harvard University

Snip:

The Concerns

There is a lot of pain and suffering in the world, and it is tempting to believe that the mental health community knows how to help. It is widely believed, both by mental health professionals and the general population, that if only a person gets the right psychiatric diagnosis, the therapist will know what kind of measures will be the most helpful. Unfortunately, that is not usually the case, and getting a psychiatric diagnosis can often create more problems than it solves, including a lifetime of being labeled, difficulties with obtaining affordable (or any) health insurance (due to now having a pre-existing condition), loss of employment, loss of child custody, the overlooking of physical illnesses and injuries because of everything being attributed to psychological factors, and the loss of the right to make decisions about one’s medical and legal affairs. The creation and use of psychiatric diagnosis, unlike, for instance, psychiatric drugs, is not overseen by any regulatory body, and rarely does anyone raise the question of what role the assignment of a psychiatric label has played in creating problems for individuals.[ii]

The Problematic History

These serious limitations have not prevented the authors of the American Psychiatric Association’s (APA) Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), sometimes known as “the therapist’s Bible,” from making expansive claims about their knowledge and authority and wielding enormous power to decide who will and will not be called mentally ill and what the varieties of alleged mental illness will be. The DSM’s current edition is called DSM-IV-TR, and it was preceded by the original DSM (in 1952), then DSM-II (1968), DSM-III (1980), DSM-III-R (Third Edition Revised)(1987), DSM-IV (1994), and DSM-IV-TR (2000). The DSM-V is currently in preparation and slated for 2013 publication. Each time a new edition appears, the media ask whichever psychiatrist is the lead editor why a new edition was necessary, and like clockwork, each editor replies that it was because the previous edition really wasn’t scientific (Caplan, 1995). And each time a new edition appears, it contains many more categories than does the previous one. For instance, DSM-III-R contained 297 categories, and DSM-IV contained 374 (Caplan, 1995).

I served as an advisor to two of the DSM-IV committees, before resigning due to serious concerns after witnessing how fast and loose they play with the scientific research related to diagnosis (Caplan, 1995). The DSM is widely used, not only in the mental health system, but also in general medical practice, in schools, and in the courts. I have been involved since 1985 in trying to alert both therapists and the public to the manual’s unscientific nature and the dangers that believing in its objectivity poses. Since then, I have watched with interest a national trend toward gradually increasing openness to the idea that psychiatric diagnosis (A)is largely unscientific,(B)is highly subjective and political, and (C)can cause untold harm, ranging from the patients’ lowered self-confidence to loss of custody of children to loss of health insurance (because any psychiatric label can be considered evidence of a pre-existing condition) to loss of the right to make decisions about their medical and legal affairs.

More of this article:

http://awpsych.org/index.php...
HumanSpirit

Middleburg, FL

#2 Jun 5, 2013
Inside the Battle to Define Mental Illness

Every so often Al Frances says something that seems to surprise even him. Just now, for instance, in the predawn darkness of his comfortable, rambling home in Carmel, California, he has broken off his exercise routine to declare that “there is no definition of a mental disorder. It’s bullshit. I mean, you just can’t define it.” Then an odd, reflective look crosses his face, as if he’s taking in the strangeness of this scene: Allen Frances, lead editor of the fourth edition of the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (universally known as the DSM-IV), the guy who wrote the book on mental illness, confessing that “these concepts are virtually impossible to define precisely with bright lines at the boundaries.” For the first time in two days, the conversation comes to an awkward halt.

Pasted from < http://www.wired.com/magazine/2010/12/ff_dsmv... ;

There are no genetic tests, no brain scans, blood tests, chemical imbalance tests or X-rays that can scientifically/medically prove that any psychiatric disorder is a medical condition.
HumanSpirit

Middleburg, FL

#3 Jun 5, 2013
The myths of ‘post-disaster counseling’

Pasted from < http://mindhacks.com/2011/03/15/the-myths-of-... ;

After almost any large scale disaster, you’ll hear reports that rescue workers, supplies and counselors are being sent to the area – as if mental health professionals were as vital as food and shelter.

Time has an excellent interview with psychologist Scott Lilienfeld on how our ideas about ‘post-disaster counseling’ are rapidly moving away from the ‘everyone needs to talk’ cliché due to a better understanding of mental health and resilience in the face of tragedy. Although everyone might be shaken up after a disaster, the vast majority – between about 70% and 80%– will not have mental health problems and will not need the help of psychologists or psychiatrists.

It was initially thought that legions of counselors were needed to work with everyone affected by the devastation to give sessions of ‘critical incident stress debriefings’– where people are asked to describe everything that happened to them and vent their emotions – supposedly to help prevent problems developing in the long term.

Instead, studies suggested that this was at best useless and instead probably made mental disorders more likely – probably because it raises or extends the level of stress in already very stressed people.

Perhaps unsurprisingly, most disaster victims are not that interested in exploring their emotions but want to get to a safe place, find out how there friends and family are, and solve immediate practical problems. This in itself tends to make people feel better. Consequently, new strategies involve only working with people who specifically ask for help and – instead of getting people to ‘vent’– the focus is on reducing emotional arousal, assuring physical safety and putting people in contact with loved ones. This strategy is often known as psychological first aid and was specifically designed to avoid the debriefing approach.

Time interviewee Lilienfeld has been key in challenging the idea that ‘everyone needs counselling’ after tragic events and has been a leader in making our disaster response a lot more effective. Highly recommended.

Link to Time interview on post-disaster counseling.

Pasted from < http://mindhacks.com/2011/03/15/the-myths-of-... ;
HumanSpirit

Middleburg, FL

#4 Jun 5, 2013
APA Admits there is no test for "chemical imbalance"

American Psychiatric Association admitted it lied to the American Public

http://www.webwire.com/ViewPressRel.asp...

Biopsychiatry Illuminated

THE CANDLELIGHT PROJECT by Bob Collier

29 September 2003 Issue 61

This week, a few representative excerpts from an article that I discovered on my internet travels only a matter of days ago, concerning the area in which biopsychiatry has, it seems to me, most comprehensively misled the world at large.

Please go to the website linked to below the excerpts and read the complete article. Then you will not be bamboozled should a doctor, teacher, journalist, ad man, politician, family member, friend, some bloke in your local pub, or whoever, start waffling on at you about 'mental illness' being caused by 'chemical imbalances' in the brain. You will know better!

There Are No "Chemical Imbalances"

"The hypothetical disturbances of neurochemical function that are said to underlie "mental illness" are just that: hypothetical. No experiment has ever shown that anyone has an "imbalance" of any neurotransmitters or any other brain chemicals. Nor could any conceivable experiment demonstrate the existence of a "chemical imbalance," simply because no one, least of all the biopsychiatrists, has the slightest idea what a proper and healthy chemical "balance" would look like."

"...the views and beliefs of biopsychiatry have nothing to do with the answers to scientific questions in any case: the hunt for biological "causes" of "mental illness" is an entirely fallacious enterprise in the first place; the non- existence of data to support its assertions is quite beside the point."

"The latest edition of one pharmacology text has this to say about the status of depression as a disease: "Despite extensive efforts, attempts to document the metabolic changes in human subjects predicted by these [biological] hypotheses have not, on balance, provided consistent or compelling corroboration." This is a long-winded way of admitting that not even a scrap of evidence supports the idea that depression results from a "chemical imbalance." Yet patients are told every day - by their doctors, by the media, and by drug company advertising - that it is a proven scientific fact that depression has a known biochemical origin. It follows directly that millions of Americans are being lied to by their doctors; and people surely can't give informed consent for drug treatment when what they're being "informed" by is a fraud.... To sum up: there is no evidence whatsoever to support the view that "mental illness" is biochemical in origin; in other words, things like "Unipolar Disorder" and "Attention Deficit Disorder" simply do not exist."

Read the complete article, There Are No "Chemical Imbalances" by Eaton T. Fores, at the Eaton T. Fores Research Center:

http://www.etfrc.com/ChemicalImbalances.htm

http://www.adhd-report.com/biopsychiatry/bio_...
HumanSpirit

Middleburg, FL

#5 Jun 5, 2013
Brain Stains: Traumatic therapies can have long-lasting effects on mental health

http://mnemosynosis.livejournal.com/12980.htm ...

A wave of nausea washed over Sheri J. Storm when she opened the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel on a February morning a decade ago and saw the headline:“Malpractice lawsuit: Plaintiff tells horror of memories. Woman emotionally testifies that psychiatrist planted false recollections.” The woman in the article shared a lot with Storm—the same psychiatrist, the same memories, the same diagnosis of multiple personality disorder. At that moment, Storm suddenly realized that her own illness and 200-plus personalities, though painfully real to her, were nothing more than a figment of her imagination—created by her trusted therapist, Kenneth Olson.

Storm initially sought treatment from Olson because of insomnia and anxiety associated with divorce proceedings and a new career in radio advertising. She had hoped for an antidepressant prescription or a few relaxation techniques. But after enduring hypnosis sessions, psychotropic medications and mental-ward hospitalizations, Storm had much more to worry about than stress. She had “remembered” being sexually abused by her father at the age of three and forced to engage in bestiality and satanic ritual abuse that included the slaughtering and consumption of human babies. According to her psychiatrist, these traumatic experiences had generated alternative personalities, or alters, within Storm’s mind.

Storm is now convinced that her multiple personality disorder was iatrogenic, the product of her “therapy.” But years after the psychiatric sessions have ceased, she is still tormented by vivid memories, nightmares and physical reactions to cues from her fictitious past. Although she was told that the false memories would fade over time, she has had a difficult time purging these “brain stains” from the fabric of her mind.

Storm’s case is similar to those of many other patients who underwent recovered-memory therapy that revealed sordid histories of sexual abuse and demonic ceremonies. Although the scientific literature suggests that traumatic events are rarely, if ever, repressed or forgotten, this type of therapy was widespread in the 1990s and is still practiced today. Only after several high-profile lawsuits did the American Medical Association issue warnings to patients about the unreliability of recovered memories. Nadean Cool, the patient described in the newspaper story that turned Storm’s life upside down, filed one such lawsuit. Cool received a $2.4-million settlement after 15 days of courtroom testimony. Amid the heated controversy, the American Psychiatric Association discontinued the diagnostic category of multiple personality disorder, replacing it with the slightly different diagnosis of dissociative identity disorder.

more

http://mnemosynosis.livejournal.com/12980.htm ...
HumanSpirit

Middleburg, FL

#6 Jun 5, 2013
Establishing State Mental Health Courts

http://www.ncsc.org/topics/problem-solving-co...

----------

There is no science and there has never been a cure for mental illness.

There is no medical model. No evidence based medicine and the Mental Health / Pharmaceutical industry lied about Chemical imbalance to drug the population. There is no imaging (MRI) to declare a defective brain from a normal brain.

The Mental Health Industry is political and based on hearsay. The court shouldn't except hearsay.

Psychiatry is fake science. The Thud Experiment proof.

Pasted from <
&feature=related>

Psychiatry "No Science"

http://www.youtube.com/watch... ----------

Psychiatry: An Industry of Death, Introduction

http://www.youtube.com/watch...
HumanSpirit

Middleburg, FL

#7 Jun 5, 2013
Death, violence, erratic behavior and the suicide by mind drugs

http://ssristories.com/index.php
Pharmafia

Winnipeg, Canada

#8 Jun 6, 2013
KA-Ching for the Pharmafia, then its Pharmageddon
Tyler
#9 Sep 24, 2013
I have ordered 2 times from this website PILLSMEDSHOP. COM . I called yesterday the customer care and asked for a discount as i was about to order twice the regular amount.
Jayne

UK

#11 Jan 31, 2014
I've been on Effexor from http://goo.gl/wW5CNU only one week but am cautiously very optimistic. Prior to this I was on citalopram but still feeling very low and sleeping poorly, feeling like I needed to be in bed 12-16 hours a day. Now I am waking naturally after only 8 hours sleep and finding it much easier to concentrate at work. I can hardly believe it is working so quickly but I feel so much better. I've had no side effects.

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