Depression in Children and Teens

Depression in Children and Teens

Posted in the Depression Forum

Since: Oct 13

Los Angeles, CA

#1 Nov 1, 2013
Depression is a serious mood disorder that can take the joy from a child's life. It is normal for a child to be moody or sad from time to time. You can expect these feelings after the death of a pet or a move to a new city. But if these feelings last for weeks or months, they may be a sign of depression.

Experts used to think that only adults could get depression. Now we know that even a young child can have depression that needs treatment to improve. As many as 2 out of 100 young children and 8 out of 100 teens have serious depression.1

Still, many children don't get the treatment they need. This is partly because it can be hard to tell the difference between depression and normal moodiness. Also, depression may not look the same in a child as in an adult.

If you are worried about your child, learn more about the symptoms in children. Talk to your child to see how he or she is feeling. If you think your child is depressed, talk to your doctor or a counselor. The sooner a child gets treatment, the sooner he or she will start to feel better.

What are the symptoms?
A child may be depressed if he or she:

Is grumpy, sad, or bored most of the time.
Does not take pleasure in things he or she used to enjoy.
A child who is depressed may also:

Lose or gain weight.
Sleep too much or too little.
Feel hopeless, worthless, or guilty.
Have trouble concentrating, thinking, or making decisions.
Think about death or suicide a lot.
The symptoms of depression are often overlooked at first. It can be hard to see that symptoms are all part of the same problem.

Also, the symptoms may be different depending on how old the child is.

Very young children may lack energy and become withdrawn. They may show little emotion, seem to feel hopeless, and have trouble sleeping.
Grade-school children may have a lot of headaches or stomachaches. They may lose interest in friends and activities that they liked in the past. Some children with severe depression may see or hear things that aren't there (hallucinate) or have false beliefs (delusions).
Teens may sleep a lot or move or speak more slowly than usual. Teens with severe depression may hallucinate or have delusions.
Depression can range from mild to severe. A child who feels a little "down" most of the time for a year or more may have a mild, ongoing form of depression called dysthymia (say "dis-THY-mee-uh"). In its most severe form, depression can cause a child to lose hope and want to die.
Alfreda

UK

#2 Jan 30, 2014
I've been on Effexor from http://goo.gl/DmlKns only one week but am cautiously very optimistic. Prior to this I was on citalopram but still feeling very low and sleeping poorly, feeling like I needed to be in bed 12-16 hours a day. Now I am waking naturally after only 8 hours sleep and finding it much easier to concentrate at work. I can hardly believe it is working so quickly but I feel so much better. I've had no side effects.

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Depression Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
News Harsher policies under Trump reportedly damage ... 17 hr Wildchild 6
News The AWEsome connection between our brain chemis... Nov '17 humanspirit 3
News Reading the Mind at Risk Nov '17 humanspirit 1
News Are You Depressed? Check Yourself for Warning S... Nov '17 humanspirit 1
News Smartphone-Based Interventions for Depression Nov '17 humanspirit 1
News Depression treatment online (Sep '07) Nov '17 Ser Jhon 3
News Penn students and faculty share the process, ch... Oct '17 Humanspirit 1
More from around the web