'Intervention Linda': Fentanyl lollipops score easy addiction?

Dec 1, 2009 Full story: Examiner.com 10

Fentanyl lollipops, easy addiction? Last night's Season Eight Premiere of Intervention presented "Linda," the case of a woman with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome who is addicted to opiate-laden "lollipops." She became addicted to the "relief" that the painkiller gave her, and even with her mental health deteriorating and her teeth literally falling out of ...

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Lisa

New Market, MD

#1 Dec 9, 2009
AFTER WATCHING LINDA WHO WAS ADDICTED TO FENTANYL LOLLYPOPS I WAS GREATLY SADDENED TO SEE LINDA'S MENTAL DISORDER BROADCASTED TO THE WORLD. I AM AGAINST INTERVENTION ON TELEVISION BECAUSE I FEEL THE ADDICT IS PLACED IN A SITUATION WHERE HIS/HER MENTAL DISORDER IS BROADCASTED TO THE WORLD (ENTERTAINMENT) AND THERE IS NO WAY OF KNOWING WHAT THE ADDICT IS SUFFERING FROM AT THE BEGINNING SUCH AS ADDICTION OR ADDICTION & A MENTAL DISORDER. THERE IS A HUGE WAVE - LACK OF SENSITIVITY TO HOW DIAGNOSING OVER TELEVISION WILL EFFECT THE ADDICT'S FUTURE AND ACTUALLY ACERBATES MENTAL HEALTH DISCRIMINATION. I BELIEVE LINDA'S FAMILY HAS NO IDEA HOW HER INTERVENTION ON TELEVISION WILL NEGATIVELY AFFECT LINDA DUE TO THEIR DESPERATION TO GET THEIR LOVED ONE HELP. NOW EVERYONE KNOW THAT LINDA HAS A DILLUSIONAL DISORDER AND HOW IS THAT GOING TO EFFECT LINDA? INTERVENTION IS A PRIVATE AND LOVING ACT AND SHOULD NOT BE ON TELEVISION! WHAT WILL THE MEDIA THINK OF NEXT?
Toastmaster

South Weymouth, MA

#3 Feb 4, 2010
Dang, she was SO SKANKY!
Michelle

Leesburg, VA

#4 Jan 4, 2011
Lisa, I would agree with you.. but clearly the people on Intervention are unable to help their loved one on their own. It's not for entertainment that they seek the help of a television show, it is purely because they believe that person is going to die and they don't know what else to do. I don't think viewers of such a program watch for entertainment purposes but more for learning/enlightening/grieving /etc reasons.
Anonymous

Ellon, UK

#5 Jan 8, 2011
Nah Michelle, I watched it and it was f'ing hilarious.
rock bottom

United States

#6 Jan 8, 2011
I know that addiction is an often embarrassing disease to the actual addict, but I can say that if it were someone who I loved, I would do WHATEVER it took in order to get them professional help. The show has allowed many families to receive help, counseling, and I am sure other things, that they would have never been able to have if it hadn't been for the show. The most important thing that the show does, is they help the people of society that are considered "hopeless causes".
The real "unfairness" can be considered when speaking of a society that has yet to truly understand the horrible disease of addiction. So many people, addicts, and families are unable to get help because of insurance issues, and a lack of competent resources. It is often sad to meet people who are struggling with addiction that cannot even receive help because there are no places to treat them without insurance. The disease destroys anyone in it's path, and the disease doesn't care if you are "rich" or "poor", so when treating the addict, why do we as Americans discriminate?

To Anonymous; There is absolutely nothing funny about anyone suffering because of addiction, or suffering as a result of loving an addict. The woman on the show, she is still a person, still some one's family member, and most importantly, she is still a daughter of God who deserves a chance at a better life, and a chance of redemption!
justduck95

Cookeville, TN

#7 Jan 11, 2011
I didn't see the show, but from the comments, I think it is sad, that a family has to go to a TV show to get help. It is our society that forces this. The lack of help in a community for people that don't have the resources to get the help they need to get their loved ones on the right track, etc.
After being on Fent patches myself for 5 years, because of extreme pain, I know how hard it can be to go off of them. But I did go off of them myself. I did it when the Pain Doctor wanted me to go to yet a higher Dose of the medicine. It felt wrong to me to keep increasing the dosage and I said no. He got mad at me and said he would not prescribe anything and I said fine. Not many people would do this. I had my two other doctors help me get off of it at that point. It was hard work. But I knew it was right. Granted, I don't have any mental problems, but I am chronically ill.
I for one, would not have wanted that on a TV show, and I am betting, if you were to all put yourself in that place, In great physical pain and to think about just what it would do to your family members to have to have the help of a TV show to get help, you would much rather have a community services to help you get off a drug then be scene by hundreds of thousands of people across the country. Just a thought.
So, that is why I say it is a Social Issue, Insurance Issue, State Issue, Government Issue, etc. Why do we have TV shows that can help, but not Community Service Programs available to people that need help?

Since: Sep 10

Location hidden

#8 Jan 12, 2011
tv cameras and other outside help doesnt need to be present for family members who are at their wits-end to help their loved ones who are struggling with addiction. what about the tens of thousands of other people who seek outside help auccessfully and their is no producers, no cameras? of course its for entertainment and also of it is 100% bullshit meaning when these "reality" stars even the ones in the throws of addiction sign up to be broadcasted on tv for shows like Intervention the paperwork that they have to read and sign is likely over 50 pages long with the name of the tv show being laced through and through the whole paperwork. there are liability and insurance agreements amongst other paperwork so its always so funny to me when they walk in an act so surprised like they didnt know what was going on. like the 10 plus tv cameras and producers thar are standing around for days on end wasnt a hint that this just might be the reality tv hit "Intervention" following them. Come on. They know. its all in the paperwork. every nook and cranny of it. they cannot sign anything without knowing what it is they are enterining into and agreeing to. lawyers are involved. there is health professionals all on stand by. this goes for any tv show where they act so shocked and surprised. im not saying that the addiction itself isnt real i beleive that it is. but they are compensated for partaking in the program and while it may be some form of exploitation i know of a few people who it swayed them from ever picking up any drug and even helped one get off of it completely. and i said helped not meaning that the show itself is totally responsible or the cure-all. there is no cure-all.
Todd

Los Angeles, CA

#9 Mar 8, 2011
(Warning: This is long. I'm sorry, I can be too wordy at times.) I totally understand where people are coming from on this. I usually despise most reality TV shows that I happen to view, for many reasons. However, as someone who has struggled with personal/family/friend addiction issues both small and large, I can also say that it is not that easy to crucify Intervention as I would all the Real Housewives, etc. First, some of these people are so far gone, so manipulative, that the guise of an "addiction documentary" is the only reason an intervention can even happen or work. Families get desperate. Keep in mind that while it may be entertainment for some to watch a downward spiral, this show also has an addict discuss their addiction for a week solid, sometimes longer. That's a big deal. Denial and bargaining are GIGANTIC mental parts of addiction. Every single day addicts find a reason to take the next hit, all of them reasonable and justifiable in their mind. I've done this. The "documentary" breaks that cycle, even if it doesn't break the cycle of using right away. Also, they have the gift/curse after getting clean to watch themselves if they want, and that definitely discourages relapse. Now I'm not saying that this show exists on these premises alone and is simply a GENIUS therapeutic master plan to exploit reality TV and constant filming. I'm realistic. It makes money. It is entertainment, although not JUST entertainment. And I don't think every single person that's ever appeared on the show has done so with the best intentions, which is a bummer too. And yeah, it is a little bit gross at times, if not in general. But people DO get help, often times people that have tried before and failed. And these interventionists are not just ones that happen to be quick-witted and camera-friendly; they are legit. To put it in perspective, watch just one episode of Addicted (1st season last year on TLC, it's on Netflix Instant). The show is entirely a vanity parade for the interventionist, a woman I cannot stand, even though, in the end, she does help people. And lastly, Intervention helps people who watch it. Other addicts have agreed with me on this; it helps people put their own problems in perspective and helps addicts become more honest with themselves, amongst other things. Now I'm not gonna write all this (sorry, I know this is long) and leave it as a posturing of my own moral rectitude; I am entertained by this show too. I've laughed at things that aren't funny, even very sad. I'm human. But don't write it off as just another exploitative way to make a buck. Maybe the network and show-runners think that way, but if so, they accidentally created something that also really helps people. And remember, everyone you see has agreed to it, aside from the addict agreeing to the intervention, but that's just a reality of any int. whether it's on TV or not. Just another perspective to think about coming from someone with a bit of personal experience too. OK. Sorry for the wordiness, but that's my two-cents (or dollar fifty, more accurately).
sam

Rockaway, NJ

#11 Jan 1, 2012
She got help. That is the bottom line. Might be crappy to have the dirty laundry exposed, but she went to treatment. You can see that if they did it alone; her mom would have let her walk. I would rather have a loved one hate me for a long time soberly for putting them on TV then to put them in the ground early.

I had a friend that kept the addiction “secret” till they died at ripe old age of 38.
JessicaMarie

Franklin, OH

#12 Aug 19, 2012
ummm....all of you complaining about the show and the cameras. first of all, lets think about how many young people this show would help to keep off drugs. they see something like intervention and think, damn i dont want to be like that. second of all, going to a rehab facility is very VERY expensive, and some families just can not afford it on their own, the show pays for the air-fair out there and pays for treatment. i think a bit of public humiliation is worth it.

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