For some, anxiety persisted up to 3 years after being declared cancer-free, study finds.

Mar 19, 2013 | Posted by: roboblogger | Full story: winnipegfreepress.com

Women who have a false-positive mammogram result -- when breast cancer is first suspected but then dispelled with further testing -- can have lingering anxiety and distress up to three years after the misdiagnosis, a new study finds.

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1 - 11 of 11 Comments Last updated Mar 20, 2013

Since: Feb 10

Saint Petersburg, FL

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#1
Mar 19, 2013
 

Judged:

1

No doubt the possibility of breast cancer is quite scary even when the final results are negative. HOWEVER, THE WHOLE ARTICLE IS BIASED AND MISLEADING.

Having a suspicious mammogram that turns out to not be cancer is NOT a "false positive."

MAMMOGRAMS CANNOT DIAGNOSE CANCER. They can only alert the patient and her doctor (I don't think they're done on men) about the need for further investigation.

My doctors did NOT tell me I had breast cancer when I had a spot on the mammogram. They sent me for an ultrasound, and then a biopsy. ONLY THE BIOPSY CAN DEFINITIVELY STATE WHETHER THE SPOT IS CANCEROUS OR NOT.

I know the women's anxiety is real, but IF the chain of events described above are explained well, then the woman needs some short term counseling to learn how to process this VERY MINOR thing she's been through so that she sees it as GOOD news -- not bad.

But the article STINKS. Personally I think Canada is trying to save medical costs by scaring women away from mammograms, because a lot of these types of ABSURD articles seem to come out of Canada.
Pharma Maims Kills

Winnipeg, Canada

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#2
Mar 19, 2013
 

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Gail Perry wrote:
No doubt the possibility of breast cancer is quite scary even when the final results are negative. HOWEVER, THE WHOLE ARTICLE IS BIASED AND MISLEADING.
Having a suspicious mammogram that turns out to not be cancer is NOT a "false positive."
MAMMOGRAMS CANNOT DIAGNOSE CANCER. They can only alert the patient and her doctor (I don't think they're done on men) about the need for further investigation.
My doctors did NOT tell me I had breast cancer when I had a spot on the mammogram. They sent me for an ultrasound, and then a biopsy. ONLY THE BIOPSY CAN DEFINITIVELY STATE WHETHER THE SPOT IS CANCEROUS OR NOT.
I know the women's anxiety is real, but IF the chain of events described above are explained well, then the woman needs some short term counseling to learn how to process this VERY MINOR thing she's been through so that she sees it as GOOD news -- not bad.
But the article STINKS. Personally I think Canada is trying to save medical costs by scaring women away from mammograms, because a lot of these types of ABSURD articles seem to come out of Canada.
Translation: DUH!

Since: Feb 10

Saint Petersburg, FL

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#3
Mar 19, 2013
 
Pharma Maims Kills wrote:
<quoted text> Translation: DUH!
Translation: I got nuthin'.
Pharma Maims Kills

Winnipeg, Canada

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#4
Mar 19, 2013
 
Gail Perry wrote:
<quoted text>
Translation: I got nuthin'.
What I got is an accurate translation.

Since: Feb 10

Saint Petersburg, FL

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#5
Mar 19, 2013
 
Pharma Maims Kills wrote:
<quoted text> What I got is an accurate translation.
You seem to be a very unhappy person. I'm sorry.
Vaccine Roulette

Winnipeg, Canada

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#6
Mar 19, 2013
 
Gail Perry wrote:
<quoted text>
You seem to be a very unhappy person. I'm sorry.
I'm unhappy about vaccine injury that's ignored and covered up because government knows the truth would be the end of vaccination. What's government/vaccine makers explanation for autism? Its a coincidence. There's your science, a coincidence that is worldwide and has grown from 1 in 10,000 to 1 in 88 as of 2007 in the USA. Sorry but only a moron can ignore what's really happening and parrot what authorities say.

Since: Feb 10

Saint Petersburg, FL

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#7
Mar 20, 2013
 
Vaccine Roulette wrote:
<quoted text> I'm unhappy about vaccine injury that's ignored and covered up because government knows the truth would be the end of vaccination. What's government/vaccine makers explanation for autism? Its a coincidence. There's your science, a coincidence that is worldwide and has grown from 1 in 10,000 to 1 in 88 as of 2007 in the USA. Sorry but only a moron can ignore what's really happening and parrot what authorities say.
The real science has been explained to you over and over, and you continue to cling to the pseudo-science.

I think there are two people who buy into this "government conspiracy" notion:

1) parents who have a child (or more than one) with autism and are desperate to know why, desperate to identify what went wrong. The best of them crusade for change. Unfortunately none of them have any scientific training and don't realize they've been hornswaggled by an industry reaching for their wallets (not "pharmas" -- the alternatives market is the one who is so grasping, sorry.)

2) people who believe conspiracy theories because it allows them to feel superior to anyone stupid enough to not believe them.

I know we've seen the second time here, and I have no sympathy for them. Often they sell snake oil products as well. Scaring the rest of us away from mainstream medicine creates new customers for their alternatives. It' not nice and in some cases deadly for the poor suckers who buy their snake oil.

Other than that I have no opinion.:)
Vaccine Roulette

Winnipeg, Canada

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#8
Mar 20, 2013
 
Gail Perry wrote:
<quoted text>
The real science has been explained to you over and over, and you continue to cling to the pseudo-science.
I think there are two people who buy into this "government conspiracy" notion:
1) parents who have a child (or more than one) with autism and are desperate to know why, desperate to identify what went wrong. The best of them crusade for change. Unfortunately none of them have any scientific training and don't realize they've been hornswaggled by an industry reaching for their wallets (not "pharmas" -- the alternatives market is the one who is so grasping, sorry.)
2) people who believe conspiracy theories because it allows them to feel superior to anyone stupid enough to not believe them.
I know we've seen the second time here, and I have no sympathy for them. Often they sell snake oil products as well. Scaring the rest of us away from mainstream medicine creates new customers for their alternatives. It' not nice and in some cases deadly for the poor suckers who buy their snake oil.
Other than that I have no opinion.:)
The latest USA count, autism 1 in 50. Was 1 in 88 in 2007. In the 1980's it was 1 in 10,000. What's going on Einstein? Got children? Grandchildren? You'll have autism in your family soon.

Since: Feb 10

Saint Petersburg, FL

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#9
Mar 20, 2013
 
Vaccine Roulette wrote:
<quoted text> The latest USA count, autism 1 in 50. Was 1 in 88 in 2007. In the 1980's it was 1 in 10,000. What's going on Einstein? Got children? Grandchildren? You'll have autism in your family soon.
The rate NOW is one in 88. In the 1980's only the most severe cases were diagnosed. The obvious ones, like the "Rainman" of the famous movie. I was in special education starting the year 1970 and can remember students we never managed to diagnose but who clearly needed help. Now, those students would have been diagnosed with autism, which would have led to more appropriate and effective interventions for them.

What's going on with Einstein? He was most likely NOT on the autistic spectrum. Oh, wait. You were just calling names again. You seem to have limited use of vocabulary. I could point out that that's one sign of mild autism.

Folks, this is the kind of unconscionable scare tactics that are going on in alternative medicine -- statistics inflation like the claim that one in 50 children have autism. Just not true, but if you see something often enough, you tend to believe it.

It matters in the breast cancer forum because there are people who will try to scare breast cancer patients away from mainstream treatments.

If I had Stage IV breast cancer I would look at alternatives, but as soon as the person/company said that one in fifty children have autism I would know I was talking to a snake oil salesman.

That's what I suggest the intelligent people here do. If someone throws out a statistic like that, open a new window and check the number. Then you'll know if someone is trying to blow smoke up your skirt, as this person just tried to do.
1 in 50 USA

Winnipeg, Canada

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#10
Mar 20, 2013
 
Gail Perry wrote:
<quoted text>
The rate NOW is one in 88. In the 1980's only the most severe cases were diagnosed. The obvious ones, like the "Rainman" of the famous movie. I was in special education starting the year 1970 and can remember students we never managed to diagnose but who clearly needed help. Now, those students would have been diagnosed with autism, which would have led to more appropriate and effective interventions for them.
What's going on with Einstein? He was most likely NOT on the autistic spectrum. Oh, wait. You were just calling names again. You seem to have limited use of vocabulary. I could point out that that's one sign of mild autism.
Folks, this is the kind of unconscionable scare tactics that are going on in alternative medicine -- statistics inflation like the claim that one in 50 children have autism. Just not true, but if you see something often enough, you tend to believe it.
It matters in the breast cancer forum because there are people who will try to scare breast cancer patients away from mainstream treatments.
If I had Stage IV breast cancer I would look at alternatives, but as soon as the person/company said that one in fifty children have autism I would know I was talking to a snake oil salesman.
That's what I suggest the intelligent people here do. If someone throws out a statistic like that, open a new window and check the number. Then you'll know if someone is trying to blow smoke up your skirt, as this person just tried to do.
Actually some claim Einstein and many intelligent men are autistic even though there's little evidence. They do it to make autism sound genius and positive so parents will hope they get one of these quirky savants that will tour the world playing piano.

Since: Feb 10

Saint Petersburg, FL

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#11
Mar 20, 2013
 
1 in 50 USA wrote:
<quoted text> Actually some claim Einstein and many intelligent men are autistic even though there's little evidence. They do it to make autism sound genius and positive so parents will hope they get one of these quirky savants that will tour the world playing piano.
Yes, I'm well aware that some make all sorts of claims.

Many people with autism are very intelligent. But they make the claim because many with autism are intelligent.

People with autism have a MAJOR learning difference when compared to non-autistic people. Unless carefully taught how to generalize, they focus on differences rather than similarities. So everything is a set of 1 to them. Most people do just the opposite and look for similarities. They can group apples in several ways: things that grow on trees, red things, roundish things, fruit. Many people with autism will have great difficulty putting an apple in any group except "apple."

I know of a young man with autism who drank his coffee every day in a specific white mug. No one knew why he preferred that mug, but he would only drink his coffee from that mug. One day, the mug was unfortunately broken, and he was given a cup of coffee in a different mug. To him, it wasn't coffee, and he was insistent about that. It had to be in that particular white mug for it to be coffee. Not even a different white mug made it "coffee" to him.

Clearly, Einstein could generalize and see new connections in similarities that others had missed -- just the opposite of how the great majority of most people on the spectrum think about things. Being a true genius will make you different from others, but autism doesn't equal "difference." They aren't interchangeable terms.

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