Cancer patients pick antidepressant for hot flashes

Nov 8, 2010 Full story: Reuters 75

Breast cancer survivors who struggle with hot flashes may find respite in an antidepressant, according to a new study that suggests the medication should be the go-to drug when the overheating is severe.

Full Story
Gail Perry

Tampa, FL

#43 Aug 24, 2011
Bradybelle wrote:
Sheesh, I didn't expect to be abused. It IS my life! And it is my choice! Paxil works for me, for what ever reason. It may not work for anyone else. I have been thru hell and don't need to put up with anything from someone who doesn't know me and isn't my Dr.!
You're right. Just take the best and leave the rest.
btdt

Scarborough, Canada

#44 Aug 24, 2011
For anyone interested here is a new twist on this issue
http://www.wellnessresources.com/freedom/arti...

Here is a bit from the article:
"According to the review article above, the method of BDNF activation by SSRI antidepressants utilizes a specific gene signaling pathway called TrkB (Tropomyosin-associated kinase). The overexpression of this particular gene signal is known to cause breast cancer19. It is not that BDNF causes breast cancer. Indeed, just about every nutrient listed above that boosts BDNF production naturally also protects against breast cancer. This is the difference between nutrition and drugs. Nutrients and exercise act in harmony with the brain to bolster its natural function, while nourishing and protecting other areas of the body. In this case SSRIs are manipulating an injury recovery strategy to boost BDNF by actually poisoning brain cells. This strategy was never intended to be used on an ongoing basis. It is quite clear that the TNFa activation of BDNF20 can have deleterious effects on the nervous systems and may not help BDNF production at all. The science provides a direct link to cancer, especially breast cancer.

Breast Cancer and SSRI Use

Human data regarding SSRI use and breast cancer is highly controversial. The reason it is controversial is due to Big Pharma-funded “scientists for hire” who crank out studies that say there is no risk. This is only one aspect of the blatant and fraudulent misrepresentation of SSRI risks and benefits.

This issue came front and center in an April 2011 open access article published in Plos One21 that reviewed 61 studies regarding breast and ovarian cancer and antidepressant use. The overall data showed that there was an 11% increased risk for breast and ovarian cancer associated with all types of antidepressants. The association between the SSRI type of antidepressants and cancer was stronger than for any other type of antidepressant, with all SSRI studies but one showing an increased risk of female cancer. Additionally, this April 2011 study also evaluated the financial ties of study authors to the companies that make antidepressants. Shockingly, none of the 15 researchers with financial ties to the industry found any risk for breast/ovarian cancer in the studies they conducted, whereas 43% of the researchers without industry ties found clear evidence of cancer risk. The authors called for more research to determine the exact nature of this risk, since 10%- 15% of women are on these drugs. Don’t expect the FDA to do anything meaningful any time soon.

Another angle is that women with breast cancer are often put on SSRI medications because they are depressed about their health. According to a February 2010 open access article published in the British Medical Journal22, the SSRI antidepressants block the effectiveness of Tamoxifen causing up to a 91% increased risk of death from breast cancer in a 2.5 year period of follow up. "
The Disturbing Picture of the Cruel SSRI Scam
btdt

Scarborough, Canada

#45 Aug 24, 2011
Bradybelle wrote:
Sheesh, I didn't expect to be abused. It IS my life! And it is my choice! Paxil works for me, for what ever reason. It may not work for anyone else. I have been thru hell and don't need to put up with anything from someone who doesn't know me and isn't my Dr.!
Abused???
That was never my intent and I am sorry you are taking it that way. You don't have to do anything especially read this... all is a choice I am just trying to see to it you are informed.. of course I may be completely wrong whatever you think of me is not the point what of the studies in the previous post? You don't have to reply and you are not the only person reading this board it is for everyone to decide for themselves.
You like paxil take paxil your choice no animosity on my part at all.
btdt

Scarborough, Canada

#46 Aug 26, 2011
ooo who is deleting my posts showing your hand eh?
well I will just have to put it back now won't I this time I will make a copy so it is easy to fix next time you do this.

When you see a headline like this in the news,“Anti-inflammatory Drugs Reduce the Effectiveness of SSRI Antidepressants,” what does it make you think? The impression given is that if you are taking an SSRI then you shouldn’t take any pain pills if you want the antidepressants to work – which is the clear message of the press release1 that accompanied the study. If you’re keeping up with your health knowledge, you would realize that SSRI antidepressants must be “working” by some type of inflammatory method. It is now common knowledge that low-grade excess inflammation is behind virtually every disease of aging. The obvious contradictions don’t add up to health. Pulling strings further, as I explain in this article, leads to an understanding as to why antidepressants are associated with an increased risk of breast cancer, brain damage over time, and a significantly increased risk of early mortality. This is information the pill pushers at Big Pharma would prefer you never understood.
The study showed that the use of anti-inflammatory pain medications, such as ibuprofen, aspirin and naproxen, reduced the “effectiveness” of the most widely used type of antidepressants. A combination of an animal study and a large scale human data evaluation led researchers to conclude that the typical response rate to SSRIs of 54% dropped to 40%.
According to the review article above, the method of BDNF activation by SSRI antidepressants utilizes a specific gene signaling pathway called TrkB (Tropomyosin-associated kinase). The overexpression of this particular gene signal is known to cause breast cancer19.
btdt

Scarborough, Canada

#47 Aug 26, 2011
Breast Cancer and SSRI Use
Human data regarding SSRI use and breast cancer is highly controversial. The reason it is controversial is due to Big Pharma-funded “scientists for hire” who crank out studies that say there is no risk. This is only one aspect of the blatant and fraudulent misrepresentation of SSRI risks and benefits.
This issue came front and center in an April 2011 open access article published in Plos One21 that reviewed 61 studies regarding breast and ovarian cancer and antidepressant use. The overall data showed that there was an 11% increased risk for breast and ovarian cancer associated with all types of antidepressants. The association between the SSRI type of antidepressants and cancer was stronger than for any other type of antidepressant, with all SSRI studies but one showing an increased risk of female cancer. Additionally, this April 2011 study also evaluated the financial ties of study authors to the companies that make antidepressants. Shockingly, none of the 15 researchers with financial ties to the industry found any risk for breast/ovarian cancer in the studies they conducted, whereas 43% of the researchers without industry ties found clear evidence of cancer risk. The authors called for more research to determine the exact nature of this risk, since 10%- 15% of women are on these drugs. Don’t expect the FDA to do anything meaningful any time soon.
Another angle is that women with breast cancer are often put on SSRI medications because they are depressed about their health. According to a February 2010 open access article published in the British Medical Journal22, the SSRI antidepressants block the effectiveness of Tamoxifen causing up to a 91% increased risk of death from breast cancer in a 2.5 year period of follow up.
The Disturbing Picture of the Cruel SSRI Scam
The SSRI literature cover-up extends far beyond attempting to hide or negate the link to breast cancer. The fraudulent scam goes to the heart of the matter- whether the drugs even work very well at all.
In 2008 the New England Journal of Medicine exposed the extent of the antidepressant deception. The great majority of negative SSRI studies were never published. A whistleblower who had worked at the FDA and was familiar with the data forced the data to public view. It showed 37 studies the FDA considered positive were published, whereas only 3 negative studies were published. 33 studies the FDA considered negative or questionable were either not published (22) or published with spin to look positive when they were not (11). This made antidepressant studies appear 96% positive in the literature, when in fact the studies were only 51% positive. In fact, as Newsweek magazine explained in January of 2010, that “benefit” was hardly any different than the placebo.
On the other hand, rather extreme side effect data from taking SSRI antidepressants continues to pour in. In November of 2008, it was shown that anyone over the age of 50 taking SSRIs on a continual basis had double the risk for fractures, as excessive serotonin production directly blocks new bone formation. In March of 2009 it was reported in a large study of women that antidepressant use, independent of other variables, was linked to a statistically increased risk of sudden cardiac death. In December of 2009 researchers reported that in 136,000 postmenopausal women taking SSRIs there was a 45% increased risk of stroke of any kind, a 32% increased risk of mortality23 from any cause, a 212% increased risk of a hemorrhagic stroke, and a 210% increased risk that the stroke damage
Read it all at\
http://www.wellnessresources.com/freedom/arti...
Gail Perry

Tampa, FL

#48 Aug 26, 2011
Unfortunately, BTDT is NOT using a reliable source. It is extremely easy on the Internet to find sources that SOUND credible but have some hidden (or not-so-hidden) agenda against something or other.

Here's your sign:

GOOD RESEARCH DOES NOT REPORT IN PERCENTAGES. Period.

If you're reading lots of percentages, you aren't reading good research. People THINK they understand percentages, but the statistics used in research are far more complicated than that.

PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE talk to your oncologist about this issue and do NOT rely on biased Internet sources.

If an antidepressant makes it possible for you to take either Tamoxifen or an AI, you may well be better off doing that than dropping the Tamoxifen or AI, and I *guarantee* you that your doctor won't be making that call based on a biased Internet site.

The people who write these sites are passionate, as are the people who believe those sites. That doesn't make them right. It only makes them passionate.

And, SSRI's do NOT work by reducing inflammation. Drug interactions aren't nearly as simple as was just stated above my post. Sorry, folks but it just isn't that simple.

You have to talk to your doctor and trust your doctor. If your doctor doesn't have time and/or you don't trust him/her -- change doctors. But don't assume, when the consequences are this great, that you can sort it out on your own unless you yourself have read the PRIMARY RESEARCH (not a biased Internet site) AND you have the medical and specialized reading skills to thoroughly understand that primary research.

This is dangerous, what's going on here.
btdt

Scarborough, Canada

#49 Aug 30, 2011
Bradybelle wrote:
Sheesh, I didn't expect to be abused. It IS my life! And it is my choice! Paxil works for me, for what ever reason. It may not work for anyone else. I have been thru hell and don't need to put up with anything from someone who doesn't know me and isn't my Dr.!
did mean for it to sound abusive and am sorry you took it that way I have read comparing antidepressants that paxil is not the best choice it can actually cause cancer if you don't want to read or look fine.
I was trying to help you help your doctor to give you the best care that science can offer but if you feel you have that already fine.
Some of us no longer trust the metdical people to have the best answers it is a profession like other these are men and woman whho have failing like any other profession some do research and homework some don't some plumbers suck some don't the difference is the plumbers that suck go out of business the doctors well I think you know the answer to that.
He may not even be a bad doctor just does not have in his hands the right research that is a big problem with doctors today so much information and not enough time.
There have been all kinds of fines against pharmaceutical companies for purposefully misleading doctors with their advertising this is part of the problem especially with this type of drug.
btdt

Scarborough, Canada

#50 Aug 30, 2011
btdt wrote:
Breast Cancer and SSRI Use
Human data regarding SSRI use and breast cancer is highly controversial. The reason it is controversial is due to Big Pharma-funded “scientists for hire” who crank out studies that say there is no risk. This is only one aspect of the blatant and fraudulent misrepresentation of SSRI risks and benefits.
This issue came front and center in an April 2011 open access article published in Plos One21 that reviewed 61 studies regarding breast and ovarian cancer and antidepressant use. The overall data showed that there was an 11% increased risk for breast and ovarian cancer associated with all types of antidepressants. The association between the SSRI type of antidepressants and cancer was stronger than for any other type of antidepressant, with all SSRI studies but one showing an increased risk of female cancer. Additionally, this April 2011 study also evaluated the financial ties of study authors to the companies that make antidepressants. Shockingly, none of the 15 researchers with financial ties to the industry found any risk for breast/ovarian cancer in the studies they conducted, whereas 43% of the researchers without industry ties found clear evidence of cancer risk. The authors called for more research to determine the exact nature of this risk, since 10%- 15% of women are on these drugs. Don’t expect the FDA to do anything meaningful any time soon.
Another angle is that women with breast cancer are often put on SSRI medications because they are depressed about their health. According to a February 2010 open access article published in the British Medical Journal22, the SSRI antidepressants block the effectiveness of Tamoxifen causing up to a 91% increased risk of death from breast cancer in a 2.5 year period of follow up.
The Disturbing Picture of the Cruel SSRI Scam
The SSRI literature cover-up extends far beyond attempting to hide or negate the link to breast cancer. The fraudulent scam goes to the heart of the matter- whether the drugs even work very well at all.
In 2008 the New England Journal of Medicine exposed the extent of the antidepressant deception. The great majority of negative SSRI studies were never published. A whistleblower who had worked at the FDA and was familiar with the data forced the data to public view. It showed 37 studies the FDA considered positive were published, whereas only 3 negative studies were published. 33 studies the FDA considered negative or questionable were either not published (22) or published with spin to look positive when they were not (11). This made antidepressant studies appear 96% positive in the literature, when in fact the studies were only 51% positive. In fact, as Newsweek magazine explained in January of 2010, that “benefit” was hardly any different than the placebo.
On the other hand, rather extreme side effect data from taking SSRI antidepressants continues to pour in. In November of 2008, it was shown that anyone over the age of 50 taking SSRIs on a continual basis had double the risk for fractures, as excessive serotonin production directly blocks new bone formation. In March of 2009 it was reported in a large study of women that antidepressant use, independent of other variables, was linked to a statistically increased risk of sudden cardiac death. In December of 2009 researchers reported that in 136,000 postmenopausal women taking SSRIs there was a 45% increased risk of stroke of any kind, a 32% increased risk of mortality23 from any cause, a 212% increased risk of a hemorrhagic stroke, and a 210% increased risk that the stroke damage
Read it all at\
http://www.wellnessresources.com/freedom/arti...
bump
btdt

Scarborough, Canada

#51 Aug 30, 2011
SarahCharie wrote:
Here's some info for survivors who who might be thinking of using other (non-Effexor) antidepressants. Paxil appears to reduce the benefit of tamoxifen in breast cancer survivors. Prozac increased the metastasis of breast cancer cells to the brain in a mouse model of breast cancer. The names of the studies are given below (Google the titles if you are interested):
"Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and breast cancer mortality in women receiving tamoxifen: a population based cohort study"
"Brain plasticity and its effects on breast tumor metastasis to the brain"
It's not that all anti-depressants are necessarily dangerous, but we need to get the facts on any that are prescribed for us (especially by a non-onc), as was pointed out by Gail above. Hope this is useful,
Sarah
bump
Gail Perry

Saint Petersburg, FL

#52 Aug 31, 2011
btdt wrote:
<quoted text>
bump
Bump? For the truth?

That's what happens. Some antidepressants weaken the effects of both Tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors. Although non-oncologists may be prescribing them, SURELY survivors of cancer have enough sense to tell their oncologists everything they're taking. They can also check with their pharmacists, who has access to the same solid information.

The issue is *HOW MUCH* antidepressants reduce the efficacy. Lest we forget: depression is also a condition that can cause death -- by suicide. I can speak first hand to the devastating effects of both AI's and Tamoxifen. And by the way -- Tamoxifen made me depressed. What was I supposed do to?

I chose to stop taking AI's and to not replace them with Tamoxifen. I'm one of the lucky ones -- I'm coming up on my five year anniversary. At that point, the risk of mets doesn't go away entirely, but it does plummet. But it didn't have to go that way.

For me, I had no choice. Both AI's and Tamoxifen were completely wrecking my life. Not everyone reacts that extremely, but my side effects were so extreme from Tamoxifen that I have been classified as "allergic" to it, even though it's not a classic allergy. It's enough of a warning for it not to be prescribed for me, the point of calling it that.

AI's and Tamoxifen are miracle drugs,and if a woman can find a way to tolerate them, it can be the difference between life and death. Only your doctor can tell you exactly how much the efficacy is diminished by certain antidepressants. It simply is not a black-and-white issue.

BTDT myself.
btdt

Scarborough, Canada

#53 Aug 31, 2011
Gail Perry wrote:
<quoted text>
Bump? For the truth?
That's what happens. Some antidepressants weaken the effects of both Tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors. Although non-oncologists may be prescribing them, SURELY survivors of cancer have enough sense to tell their oncologists everything they're taking. They can also check with their pharmacists, who has access to the same solid information.
The issue is *HOW MUCH* antidepressants reduce the efficacy. Lest we forget: depression is also a condition that can cause death -- by suicide. I can speak first hand to the devastating effects of both AI's and Tamoxifen. And by the way -- Tamoxifen made me depressed. What was I supposed do to?
I chose to stop taking AI's and to not replace them with Tamoxifen. I'm one of the lucky ones -- I'm coming up on my five year anniversary. At that point, the risk of mets doesn't go away entirely, but it does plummet. But it didn't have to go that way.
For me, I had no choice. Both AI's and Tamoxifen were completely wrecking my life. Not everyone reacts that extremely, but my side effects were so extreme from Tamoxifen that I have been classified as "allergic" to it, even though it's not a classic allergy. It's enough of a warning for it not to be prescribed for me, the point of calling it that.
AI's and Tamoxifen are miracle drugs,and if a woman can find a way to tolerate them, it can be the difference between life and death. Only your doctor can tell you exactly how much the efficacy is diminished by certain antidepressants. It simply is not a black-and-white issue.
BTDT myself.
I guess at some point we all have to trust our doctors I did and was given a ssri for nerve pain in my leg followed by a severe adverse reaction years of being drugged to treat further reactions and further drug treatments I feel betrayed by my doctor and the drug industry like I have said before I know some day they will get me as death comes to us all.
I will never a trust another doctor 100% as long as I live and I will not take a drug I have not researched the shit out of if I am capable of doing the research I also will not take a drug that has not been on the market at least 20 years as it takes that long to see what the effects are... as much as help they can hurt... we all make our choices when we come to them as we see fit just saying where I stand on this issue.
And you don't have to tell me depression kills I have had the worst drug induced depression in the world and spent most of my life in and out of that state due to drug withdrawals from a drug given to me for a condition it was not reported to treat all this and 20 years of my life for what a doctors to say sorry I made a mistake.. they do happen I am proof. It is called off label prescribing a doctor can legally give you any drug to treat anything he sees fit.. this particular doctor is dead was dead by the time I figured this out guess he was counting on that by the time they figure it our I will be dead hey is that not what Brush said forget about it I am done.
happyface

Rochester, MN

#54 Sep 2, 2011
Well ive been taking zoloft, and the color of the pill goes great with my clothes. You should Check out Karmaloop.com and use the Repcode: Swagger for a 20% discount on your entire purchase.
PatientHelper

Rochester, MN

#55 Sep 2, 2011
happyface wrote:
Well ive been taking zoloft, and the color of the pill goes great with my clothes. You should Check out Karmaloop.com and use the Repcode: Swagger for a 20% discount on your entire purchase.
Thanks Happyface that helped A LOT!!
btdt

Scarborough, Canada

#56 Sep 2, 2011
One word...
KARMA
YOUR DUE IS COMING
Nobody walks forever just the seriously rich and you would not be here if you were seriously rich.
btdt

Scarborough, Canada

#57 Sep 2, 2011
btdt wrote:
<quoted text>
I guess at some point we all have to trust our doctors I did and was given a ssri for nerve pain in my leg followed by a severe adverse reaction years of being drugged to treat further reactions and further drug treatments I feel betrayed by my doctor and the drug industry like I have said before I know some day they will get me as death comes to us all.
I will never a trust another doctor 100% as long as I live and I will not take a drug I have not researched the shit out of if I am capable of doing the research I also will not take a drug that has not been on the market at least 20 years as it takes that long to see what the effects are... as much as help they can hurt... we all make our choices when we come to them as we see fit just saying where I stand on this issue.
And you don't have to tell me depression kills I have had the worst drug induced depression in the world and spent most of my life in and out of that state due to drug withdrawals from a drug given to me for a condition it was not reported to treat all this and 20 years of my life for what a doctors to say sorry I made a mistake.. they do happen I am proof. It is called off label prescribing a doctor can legally give you any drug to treat anything he sees fit.. this particular doctor is dead was dead by the time I figured this out guess he was counting on that by the time they figure it our I will be dead hey is that not what Brush said forget about it I am done.
bump
Gail Perry

Greenville, SC

#58 Sep 4, 2011
happyface wrote:
Well ive been taking zoloft, and the color of the pill goes great with my clothes. You should Check out Karmaloop.com and use the Repcode: Swagger for a 20% discount on your entire purchase.
But you never should trust a doctor 100%, and you should research the drugs you take. You've become an intelligent user of medical care with those statements.

But it really is important for people to recognize agendized, third-party websites, which I'm sorry, but is what you quoted.

Depression can ruin your life. It can even kill you. It's not something to be taken trivially. I saw a research study once where something like 9 out of 10 people view a person with depression negatively even when they don't know the person has depression. It distorts everything.

No one should ever accept all medical recommendations blindly, but ... it's also important to get good sources to double-check. We know that at least some antidepressants lessen the efficacy of Tamoxifen and AI's, but no one here has said by how much. I had so many other negative side effects (the AI's didn't make me depressed but Tamoxifen did in a major way) that I dropped them. It was a real and serious gamble but in the end both my PCP and my oncologist (as well as me) agreed that I just couldn't continue to take it.

Turns out 50% of women who take AI's make my choice, even faced with the fact that it could be a life-and-death choice. I had no illusions about it.

But that means that the other 50% can tolerate them.

Not being able to tolerate the AI's (which was originally presented to me by my surgeon as "Maybe you'll be lucky and just have to take a pill every day" -- GREAT surgeon, but he did not manage women on these drugs)... made me very glad that I had done every other possible thing I could do to reduce my risk including losing weight, exercising, mastectomy instead of lumpectomy (didn't want to do X-ray), and five months of chemotherapy.

I dropped the AI's and I got really lucky. I would not tell women to skip antidepressants. I would tell them to PUSH to find out how big that negative effect is first. I bet the doctors know.
btdt

Scarborough, Canada

#59 Nov 26, 2011
Bradybelle wrote:
Sheesh, I didn't expect to be abused. It IS my life! And it is my choice! Paxil works for me, for what ever reason. It may not work for anyone else. I have been thru hell and don't need to put up with anything from someone who doesn't know me and isn't my Dr.!
I am sorry you feel I abused you and I truly take it back whatever the bit was that hurt you it is not worth hurting you. The fact remains my reasons are solid in my mind as nothing is more abusive to me than being given a drug that is addictive and being told the withdrawal is something organic inside you that needs to be treated by more of the drug that caused the problem in the first place. Please understand I where I am coming from. Many people cannot get off these drugs due to withdrawal or withdrawal and taking these meds completely destroys their lives. I am not being sensational here please read the thread on topix call marriages destroyed by ssri and the many other threads... take a look at the withdrawal pages and the FDA 30+ pages of side effects. I do not want to hurt you more I am trying to spare you that is the bottom line I have done it in a way that has hurt you more for that I am truly sorry. I have been drugged for 18 years that is most of my life I have been thru sever withdrawal and at 4 years off these pills I am still not well. That is what I am trying to spare you. Forgive me please it is important to me not to hurt people.
btdt

Scarborough, Canada

#60 Nov 26, 2011
A more balanced understanding not tainted with my experience but still a warning.

Drug companies spend millions of dollars on research and development of new drugs. For FDA approval they need to provide safety and efficacy results. The drug company, with a vested interest, runs a clinical trial usually for a short time, sometimes a few weeks or maybe six months but rarely more than a year. Their new drug merely has to work as well as the standard drug it is being compared to. Sometimes the drug is compared to a sugar pill to be sure it is safe and that there are no severe side effects.

Once the drug is approved, marketing wizards take over, the ads are plastered on TV, in the magazines, and on the internet, and then the journalists get in the thick of things too, for better or worse, and spin the drug for good or bad. Many doctors rarely read the original study on the drug’s effectiveness — but they are given free samples, free lunches, free pens, and fancy brochures about the latest and greatest new drug.

Since 1997, drugs companies have been allowed to directly advertise to the public (prior to that ads were only placed in medical journals). But it’s still illegal to advertise a drug for an indication that the FDA has not approved. So one can see that the drug companies have resorted to a different level of promotion — word of mouth, which we know from playing the game “telephone” as children, may set us up to lose important information.

We understand that transitioning through menopause can be a major life challenge — we know that there are good days, bad days, and everything in-between. We know, too, that the experience is not merely a physical one. It’s not just about hot flashes and night sweats; there is a very powerful emotional shift taking place in your life, as the way in which you now view yourself — and the way in which women at menopause are viewed at large — is changing. We also recognize that there’s a lot to think about before a woman decides to take antidepressants for hot flashes and other symptoms of hormonal imbalance, as the efficacy and potential side effects of these drugs, short and long term, carry real risks. The good news is that we also know that there are other, much healthier options for finding relief from your symptoms.

much more at this link
http://www.womentowomen.com/menopause/antidep...
btdt

Scarborough, Canada

#61 Nov 26, 2011
Bradybelle wrote:
Sheesh, I didn't expect to be abused. It IS my life! And it is my choice! Paxil works for me, for what ever reason. It may not work for anyone else. I have been thru hell and don't need to put up with anything from someone who doesn't know me and isn't my Dr.!
I did not mean to hurt you further or in any way. Being given a drug and not being told the true effects long term short term or that that are addictive is also very addcitive. It has been the experience of many and myself that when trying to get off these drugs we are told the withdrawal symptoms are actually a disorder inside of us that we need more of the offending drug to treat.... this is the trap I am trying to spring you from. I had not psych issues when I started on these drugs I had leg pain... yep leg pain. 18 years I was addicted I had psych issues from the first month on prozac and more drugs of the same type deemed to be the cure... 18 years is most of my life addicted leaving me wide open for long term affects I am facing now... with likely more to come. It is the drug that keeps on giving. I hope you can understand where I am coming from. I did not mean to hurt you I am trying to spare you from further injury... I deeply regret and hope you will forgive me as it is important to me not to hurt people. Forgive me please.
Gail Perry

Saint Petersburg, FL

#62 Nov 26, 2011
"It’s not just about hot flashes and night sweats; there is a very powerful emotional shift taking place in your life, as the way in which you now view yourself — and the way in which women at menopause are viewed at large — is changing..."

Bull hockey!

Maybe it's that way for some women. For me, it WAS about the hot flashes.

PERIOD.

The incredibly biased and sexist statement above ... well, if anyone on the staff of a doctor's office announced to me that all or even most women are in some kind of emotional turmoil over the facts of menopause, experiencing a "powerful emotional shift" because of "changes in their lives ..." I would leave and refuse to pay the bill.

Who writes such trash? WHEN will women be seen as individuals? How sexist to think that we see ourselves as used up if we can't have babies.

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