Etheridge: Jolie mastectomy not 'brave choice'

Jun 19, 2013 | Posted by: roboblogger | Full story: KMBC-TV

Rock legend and breast cancer survivor Melissa Etheridge is taking issue with Angelina Jolie's decision to have a double mastectomy.

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Since: Mar 09

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#1
Jun 19, 2013
 

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And this is on the G/L forum because ....

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#4
Jun 19, 2013
 

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I disagree. I think it IS a brave choice. Anytime you decide to have part of your body removed, for whatever reason, it is a brave choice, For one thing, you may NOT awake after surgery. And it's obviously a life-altering decision.

Yes, I think it's brave.

Since: Feb 10

Saint Petersburg, FL

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Jun 19, 2013
 

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I don't think it's "brave." It's logical.

She runs a 95% of developing breast cancer. She's young and she had big, dense breasts. They could have easily missed cancer in her at an early point given the current technology. She has six children she clearly loves very much; she loves her partner; she loves her charity work.

She wants to live into old age, see her grandchildren, make more movies -- live, rather than die. She saw her mother die of breast cancer and much more recently, her aunt. She knew how sick her aunt was, that she was dying, when she made the decision.

She had implants done and she'll look as good as she ever did.

There's nothing "brave" about this, but there's nothing horrible about it, either. And, having them both done, the surgeons no doubt had no trouble making them match. That's a trick for someone like me, with one mastectomy.

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#6
Jun 19, 2013
 

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Gail Perry wrote:
I don't think it's "brave." It's logical.
She runs a 95% of developing breast cancer. She's young and she had big, dense breasts. They could have easily missed cancer in her at an early point given the current technology. She has six children she clearly loves very much; she loves her partner; she loves her charity work.
She wants to live into old age, see her grandchildren, make more movies -- live, rather than die. She saw her mother die of breast cancer and much more recently, her aunt. She knew how sick her aunt was, that she was dying, when she made the decision.
She had implants done and she'll look as good as she ever did.
There's nothing "brave" about this, but there's nothing horrible about it, either. And, having them both done, the surgeons no doubt had no trouble making them match. That's a trick for someone like me, with one mastectomy.
I have a male cousin who, in 1978, at the age of 23 years old, had both arms removed due to an accident. Since that time, he has been very active, owns his own company, and has lived with his female partner for over 20 years.

If I were ever in an accident where I had to have one or more arms or legs removed to save my life, and it were necessary for me to give my permission to do so, I do not think I would be brave enough to say yes. I just don't think so. I think that's a brave thing to agree to such a thing.

Since: Dec 08

Toronto, ON, Canada

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#8
Jun 19, 2013
 
Gail Perry wrote:
I don't think it's "brave." It's logical.
She runs a 95% of developing breast cancer. She's young and she had big, dense breasts. They could have easily missed cancer in her at an early point given the current technology. She has six children she clearly loves very much; she loves her partner; she loves her charity work.
She wants to live into old age, see her grandchildren, make more movies -- live, rather than die. She saw her mother die of breast cancer and much more recently, her aunt. She knew how sick her aunt was, that she was dying, when she made the decision.
She had implants done and she'll look as good as she ever did.
There's nothing "brave" about this, but there's nothing horrible about it, either. And, having them both done, the surgeons no doubt had no trouble making them match. That's a trick for someone like me, with one mastectomy.
I was going to say the same thing. BRCA1 breast cancer is not the same as the typical post-menopausal variety like my mother had, the latter having relatively little genetic predetermination. There is a different gene that causes people to have colon cancer early in life (their colons look like coral reefs of polyps) and this is also different than the typical form of that. These pre-determined issues need radical intervention. Etheridge is unscientific and wrong on this one.

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#9
Jun 19, 2013
 

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JohnInToronto wrote:
<quoted text>
I was going to say the same thing. BRCA1 breast cancer is not the same as the typical post-menopausal variety like my mother had, the latter having relatively little genetic predetermination. There is a different gene that causes people to have colon cancer early in life (their colons look like coral reefs of polyps) and this is also different than the typical form of that. These pre-determined issues need radical intervention. Etheridge is unscientific and wrong on this one.
A significant number of us posting here will most probably face prostate cancer at some point. How many of you have thought about what you will do if you are diagnosed with that ?

Since: Dec 08

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#10
Jun 19, 2013
 
Europa Report wrote:
<quoted text>
A significant number of us posting here will most probably face prostate cancer at some point. How many of you have thought about what you will do if you are diagnosed with that ?
Get a biopsy. Most forms of prostate cancer are so "benign" that one usually dies of something else long before they spread. The aggressive kind can be determined by biopsy.

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#12
Jun 19, 2013
 
JohnInToronto wrote:
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Get a biopsy. Most forms of prostate cancer are so "benign" that one usually dies of something else long before they spread. The aggressive kind can be determined by biopsy.
I know that. My point was that most guys here are going to get prostate cancer one day. What I've read the past few years is the best medical advice is to do nothing because it's so slow-growing, you are more likely to die of something else.

And ya gotta die of somethin !:)

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#13
Jun 19, 2013
 
Europa Report wrote:
<quoted text>
I have a male cousin who, in 1978, at the age of 23 years old, had both arms removed due to an accident. Since that time, he has been very active, owns his own company, and has lived with his female partner for over 20 years.
If I were ever in an accident where I had to have one or more arms or legs removed to save my life, and it were necessary for me to give my permission to do so, I do not think I would be brave enough to say yes. I just don't think so. I think that's a brave thing to agree to such a thing.
Arms and legs are very useful, even necessary, every day. Breasts not so much.

I think the "brave" crap comes from a very primitive mystique about mammaries. It's all in the head, really; an odd form of self-denigration that whines, "But, but, but I'm not a REAL woman without my boobs, and my sole purpose of attracting and satisfying a man is compromised and my life is ovvveerrrrrr!" Truly an over-abundance of fecal matter between the ears.(One supposes blondes just needed to fill the space with something) What a nasty bit of programming girls foist on each other in middle school, then almost never seem to grow out of.(stupid little slots don't know that small ones give as much milk as big ones ... and don't wreck your posture in the process)

The mythical Amazons were reputed to carve off their starboard mammary themselves, so it wouldn't interfere with their bowstrings.

Girls, if you know that your boytoy/husband REALLY won't love you without one or both, you've probably gotten the mate suitable to your level of evolution.

Don't forget to say "MOOO" as you chew.

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#14
Jun 19, 2013
 
Gail Perry wrote:
I don't think it's "brave." It's logical.

She runs a 95% of developing breast cancer. She's young and she had big, dense breasts. They could have easily missed cancer in her at an early point given the current technology. She has six children she clearly loves very much; she loves her partner; she loves her charity work.

She wants to live into old age, see her grandchildren, make more movies -- live, rather than die. She saw her mother die of breast cancer and much more recently, her aunt. She knew how sick her aunt was, that she was dying, when she made the decision.

She had implants done and she'll look as good as she ever did.

There's nothing "brave" about this, but there's nothing horrible about it, either. And, having them both done, the surgeons no doubt had no trouble making them match. That's a trick for someone like me, with one mastectomy.
I'm with you, it's very logical. I don't think anyone should sit back and judge the decisions anyone made.

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#15
Jun 19, 2013
 
snyper wrote:
<quoted text>
Arms and legs are very useful, even necessary, every day. Breasts not so much.
I think the "brave" crap comes from a very primitive mystique about mammaries. It's all in the head, really; an odd form of self-denigration that whines, "But, but, but I'm not a REAL woman without my boobs, and my sole purpose of attracting and satisfying a man is compromised and my life is ovvveerrrrrr!" Truly an over-abundance of fecal matter between the ears.(One supposes blondes just needed to fill the space with something) What a nasty bit of programming girls foist on each other in middle school, then almost never seem to grow out of.(stupid little slots don't know that small ones give as much milk as big ones ... and don't wreck your posture in the process)
The mythical Amazons were reputed to carve off their starboard mammary themselves, so it wouldn't interfere with their bowstrings.
Girls, if you know that your boytoy/husband REALLY won't love you without one or both, you've probably gotten the mate suitable to your level of evolution.
Don't forget to say "MOOO" as you chew.
I've thought of this over the years.

If I were in a car wreck, or some sort of other accident where I had to have an arm, or a leg, or more, cut off to save my life, I do not think I could say: "Cut it off." I just don't think I could say that.(And ya gotta die of somethin !:))

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Jun 19, 2013
 

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Europa Report wrote:
<quoted text>
I've thought of this over the years.
If I were in a car wreck, or some sort of other accident where I had to have an arm, or a leg, or more, cut off to save my life, I do not think I could say: "Cut it off." I just don't think I could say that.(And ya gotta die of somethin !:))
And this from someone with a three-legged cat!

http://gma.yahoo.com/blogs/abc-blogs/u-marine...

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#17
Jun 19, 2013
 
snyper wrote:
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And this from someone with a three-legged cat!
http://gma.yahoo.com/blogs/abc-blogs/u-marine...
Calley didn't lose his leg by having it surgically removed. I had it x-rayd, and the vet showed me all the shattered bones and torn tissue and said something, or someone, had ripped off his left rear leg, prior to me adopting him at the age of 5 months old. And by that time it was completely healed. I adopted him in May, 2000.

And no, I don't think I could say that.

Since: Feb 10

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#18
Jun 19, 2013
 
Europa Report wrote:
<quoted text>
I have a male cousin who, in 1978, at the age of 23 years old, had both arms removed due to an accident. Since that time, he has been very active, owns his own company, and has lived with his female partner for over 20 years.
If I were ever in an accident where I had to have one or more arms or legs removed to save my life, and it were necessary for me to give my permission to do so, I do not think I would be brave enough to say yes. I just don't think so. I think that's a brave thing to agree to such a thing.
I think that would be much harder. Good for him for making it work! I think I'd have a harder time with my arms than my legs. We just saw film here of a 2 year old who lost both legs at the knee and is learning to walk with prosthetic legs. She walked two days ago. They're predicting she'll be running in a week. But arms? We do so much with our hands.

I admire your brother.

Since: Feb 10

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#19
Jun 19, 2013
 
Europa Report wrote:
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I know that. My point was that most guys here are going to get prostate cancer one day. What I've read the past few years is the best medical advice is to do nothing because it's so slow-growing, you are more likely to die of something else.
And ya gotta die of somethin !:)
Depends on the prostate cancer. Prostate killed my father at age 67.

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#20
Jun 19, 2013
 
Gail Perry wrote:
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Depends on the prostate cancer. Prostate killed my father at age 67.
My father died of cancer at age 62 because he couldn't give up smoking.(Both of his older brothers are still alive now in their 80's and in excellent health, and their father lived to age 98).

If I gotta die at age 67, of cancer or wateva, I'm fine with that.

Since: Feb 10

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#21
Jun 20, 2013
 
Europa Report wrote:
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My father died of cancer at age 62 because he couldn't give up smoking.(Both of his older brothers are still alive now in their 80's and in excellent health, and their father lived to age 98).
If I gotta die at age 67, of cancer or wateva, I'm fine with that.
That's nice. Go step in front of a bus, then.

My dad was in excellent health otherwise. My children didn't get to know him. He missed their graduating from high school, from college, getting married. He missed a lot of my adult life. He was a terrific father and I miss him. Might not miss you.

Since: Mar 07

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#22
Jun 20, 2013
 

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It was HER choice. Every woman in that situation has the right to make the decision that suits them best.

But any woman who would base that choice on some celebrity or another and what they chose, is a complete idiot.

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#23
Jun 20, 2013
 

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Quest wrote:
It was HER choice. Every woman in that situation has the right to make the decision that suits them best.
But any woman who would base that choice on some celebrity or another and what they chose, is a complete idiot.
But no one HAS said they're making that choice because Jolie did. The very idea is ridiculous.

What IS reasonable that people could look at her family history -- she lost her mother to breast cancer, and now her aunt, and she has a 95% chane of aquiring the disease that killed them, and saying

"What happened to Jolie could happen to me," and make the same choice.

That doesn't mean they're blindly following Jolie. We all know who Jolie is, and that puts a real face on a real problem. That isn't the same as blindly mimicking her.

I can't even imagine someone marching into a doctor's office and saying "Jolie had her breasts removed. If she wanted it, I want it!"

That's what these IDIOT critics are saying people will do. Clearly THEY wouldn't do it. They're sneering at others for something that isn't even happening. it's a non-issue.

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#24
Jun 20, 2013
 
Quest wrote:
It was HER choice. Every woman in that situation has the right to make the decision that suits them best.
But any woman who would base that choice on some celebrity or another and what they chose, is a complete idiot.
I agree.

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