Mammogram report turns guidelines top...

Mammogram report turns guidelines topsy-turvy

There are 33 comments on the TwinCities.com story from Nov 16, 2009, titled Mammogram report turns guidelines topsy-turvy. In it, TwinCities.com reports that:

An influential group's new recommendations about mammograms for younger women set off a furious debate Monday that left women without clear guidance about how best to protect their health.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at TwinCities.com.

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perry

Goleta, CA

#22 Nov 17, 2009
Good thing I had a mammogram in my forties becasue I had Breast Cancer at 46. My mother died of Breast Cancer at 46. So certain groups should be aware. The first thing my surgeon told me is most breat cancer are not heritary. So go figure. I think early screening saves lives.

Since: May 09

Encino, CA

#23 Nov 17, 2009
"ISRW" wrote:

"The only change here would be that women wouldn't get actively sought out for mammograms starting at 40 when they didn't have any other indications (like family history) to indicate high risk."

So, I wouldn't be sought out to have a mammogram because I am not in a high risk group? The message they are sending is wrong.

They are saying if you don't have indications of being at a high risk for breast cancer than you shouldn't get mammograms, or even do self-exams, until you are 50 plus. No doctor would push me to get a mammogram at 40 because I would already be dead from breast cancer. I am not high risk, there is no family history, I didn't start my period before 12, I have three children, did not have them to late or to early, eat well, exercise, not over-weight, etc, etc, etc, and yet I was diagnosed with Stage 3 breast cancer at the age of 32. I can't imagine I am the exception to the rule.

Self-Exams need to be done monthly, if you are in the habit of doing them at 40 I bet you will still be in the habit of doing them at 50. Why can't a woman at 40 have a baseline mammogram, regardless of HIGH RISK INDICATIONS, than be encouraged to do regular self-exams as well as having clinical breast exams done?

I don't care what the statistics are, the message needs to be clear - early detection SAVES LIVES! Know your lumps and bumps and don't let any panel tell you not to do a self-exam, or push for further testing if you do feel a lump. Do not dismiss it.
Bob the Bilderberg

Saint Paul, MN

#24 Nov 17, 2009
ISRW wrote:
Wow, with a single exception this entire thread is some sort of raving partisan misfire. Naturally the one intelligent contribution gets modded down...
This recommendation is not out of place with many 'best practice' considerations about screening tools. Go read JAMA or the New England Journal of Medicine, and you'll discover a steady stream of articles that legitimately look at the question of whether a given screening method (or treatment) for a disease is effective in a given group of patients. You will find that doctors do not recommend daily testing for all possible disease conditions; they use statistical measures to determine the efficacy of any given tool. The recommendation here amounts to one group's conclusion that mammograms are not particularly effective as routine screening instruments, on a yearly basis, within a specific age range. Go read their report, and you can see how they've cited the evidence for that conclusion.
There are lots and lots of cases like this in medicine. Recently routine Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) tests are being removed from the list of stuff you do routinely for asymptomatic patients. In both that case and mammograms, the recommendations aren't in any way precluding people's access. In this specific case the report actually specifically says that women who ask for a mammogram simply because they're more worried about breast cancer should still get one. The only change here would be that women wouldn't get actively sought out for mammograms starting at 40 when they didn't have any other indications (like family history) to indicate high risk.
To get from this report to rants about Obama and "death panels" takes a seriously warped view of reality, folks. All that does is make you look like dorks who can't see past their own noses. Have an adult conversation for once.
The Obama administration admits that there will be more deaths as a result of these new guidelines.

What does that tell you?

They plan to run al, health care in this country and they are looking for ways to save money when they do.

Bottom line, when they did the cost-benefit analysis, they decided that they'd rather save money than save lives. That's not surprising, given this crowd. What's disappointing is the number of cold-hearted people who agree with them and think it's ok.
Peter

Houston, TX

#25 Nov 17, 2009
Rats, the "Squeeze for the Cure" campaign is doomed.

Play this forward 10 years post Obamacare. Credibility of government on this stuff will be zero. No one will believe them; we'll all just think it's some lie to cut outlays, and we'll very possibly be right.
Sam

Hillsboro, OR

#26 Nov 18, 2009
ISRW wrote:
Wow, with a single exception this entire thread is some sort of raving partisan misfire. Naturally the one intelligent contribution gets modded down...
This recommendation is not out of place with many 'best practice' considerations about screening tools. Go read JAMA or the New England Journal of Medicine, and you'll discover a steady stream of articles that legitimately look at the question of whether a given screening method (or treatment) for a disease is effective in a given group of patients. You will find that doctors do not recommend daily testing for all possible disease conditions; they use statistical measures to determine the efficacy of any given tool. The recommendation here amounts to one group's conclusion that mammograms are not particularly effective as routine screening instruments, on a yearly basis, within a specific age range. Go read their report, and you can see how they've cited the evidence for that conclusion.
There are lots and lots of cases like this in medicine. Recently routine Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) tests are being removed from the list of stuff you do routinely for asymptomatic patients. In both that case and mammograms, the recommendations aren't in any way precluding people's access. In this specific case the report actually specifically says that women who ask for a mammogram simply because they're more worried about breast cancer should still get one. The only change here would be that women wouldn't get actively sought out for mammograms starting at 40 when they didn't have any other indications (like family history) to indicate high risk.
To get from this report to rants about Obama and "death panels" takes a seriously warped view of reality, folks. All that does is make you look like dorks who can't see past their own noses. Have an adult conversation for once.
Right on!!!!!!
Sam

Hillsboro, OR

#27 Nov 18, 2009
"Wow, with a single exception this entire thread is some sort of raving partisan misfire. Naturally the one intelligent contribution gets modded down...

This recommendation is not out of place with many 'best practice' considerations about screening tools. Go read JAMA or the New England Journal of Medicine, and you'll discover a steady stream of articles that legitimately look at the question of whether a given screening method (or treatment) for a disease is effective in a given group of patients. You will find that doctors do not recommend daily testing for all possible disease conditions; they use statistical measures to determine the efficacy of any given tool. The recommendation here amounts to one group's conclusion that mammograms are not particularly effective as routine screening instruments, on a yearly basis, within a specific age range. Go read their report, and you can see how they've cited the evidence for that conclusion.

There are lots and lots of cases like this in medicine. Recently routine Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) tests are being removed from the list of stuff you do routinely for asymptomatic patients. In both that case and mammograms, the recommendations aren't in any way precluding people's access. In this specific case the report actually specifically says that women who ask for a mammogram simply because they're more worried about breast cancer should still get one. The only change here would be that women wouldn't get actively sought out for mammograms starting at 40 when they didn't have any other indications (like family history) to indicate high risk.

To get from this report to rants about Obama and "death panels" takes a seriously warped view of reality, folks. All that does is make you look like dorks who can't see past their own noses. Have an adult conversation for once."

I say, right on!!!!!!!
Candace

Madison, WI

#28 Nov 19, 2009
So it still means that there will be less mammograms that are covered under insurance. And less women will be getting them which in turn will turn into more women having breast cancer caught later. The death rate will surely go up. How can that be a good thing?
Bob the Bilderberg

Saint Paul, MN

#29 Nov 19, 2009
Candace wrote:
So it still means that there will be less mammograms that are covered under insurance. And less women will be getting them which in turn will turn into more women having breast cancer caught later. The death rate will surely go up. How can that be a good thing?
Obama is counting on more people dying before he has to pay for too much treatment. He said it would save money.
welfare viking

United States

#30 Nov 19, 2009
Mams cost to much let's give the money to the Vikes so I can enjoy my football while I drink the beer your gonna buy me.
Gail Perry

Plant City, FL

#31 Nov 19, 2009
Sam, the PSA isn't perfect, but including it in a routine yearly physical saved my brother-in-law's life. He had an aggressive form of prostate cancer. Not all prostate cancer is slow-growing.

It is like a mammogram in that it is not perfect either. It also gives both false positives and false negatives, but I'm glad my BIL is still here.
Mekhi
#32 Sep 23, 2013
I have ordered 2 times from this website PILLSMEDSHOP. COM . I called yesterday the customer care and asked for a discount as i was about to order twice the regular amount.
Moshe
#33 Sep 23, 2013
I have ordered 2 times from this website PILLSMEDSHOP. COM . I called yesterday the customer care and asked for a discount as i was about to order twice the regular amount.
been there

Moose Jaw, Canada

#34 Sep 23, 2013
Why is no one considering the danger of accumulated
radiation that a woman receives with every mammogram?

This is a good reason not to have one every year as
we all know radiation causes cancer.

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