Early Indicators of Autism Spectrum Disorders

Jan 9, 2013 | Posted by: roboblogger | Full story: Examiner.com

It is well established that early identification and intervention are critical determinants in the course and outcome of autism spectrum disorders .

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#328
Jan 30, 2013
 

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Beats me. I can tell you of my experience- I have 5 siblings. We all grew up together, lived in the same house growing up, little exposure to cigarette smoke or processed or fast foods. Of the 6, only one has severe allergies, but then that sibling also was born with type one diabetes.

I have a friend whose mom has many allergies to about everything. My friend doesn't, but once his daughter was born, she is allergic to just about everything.

Why some people have allergies and some don't, it's an immune response and the increase probably has nothing to do with foods people ingest or are exposed to but more probably the air we breathe and the pathegens we're more exposed to each generation.
Bizarre

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#330
Jan 30, 2013
 

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Thanks for the insight this helps me in my curiosity about allergies. I know of similar stories to yours & like autism it can be managed properly by awareness which helps those in similar situations.
Elias

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#331
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friend wrote:
A study shows eczema may sometimes be an allergic reaction to the excrement from house dust mites.?
Excema is probably triggered by different stimuli. I have also a read a german study which shows an Association between applying topical antibiotic treatments and the dissapearance of excema indicating that bacteria on the skin may cause excema.
I knew somebody who had excema but when they sweated the lesions went away. It also turns out that human sweat contains anti-bacterial properties.
Elias

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#332
Jan 30, 2013
 

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friend wrote:
Interesting, but none of it links procesed foods as the cause, and one links shows Maternal smoking during pregnancy, smoking among family members, and family history of allergy (genetic) were statistically significant risks for developing asthma. None of it has much to do about autism.
There needs to be more study done on autism and comorbidity such as allergies. My daughter develops skin allergies when she is in the garden but we have no idea what triggers them.

Other comorbid conditions such as seizures and low IQ are higher in kids with ASD than the general population.

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#333
Jan 30, 2013
 

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Forget the low IQ in those with autism. IQ means very little.
Where did you get that those with autism have higher rates of seizures than the general population? 50 million people worldwide have epilepsy, which in fact are seizures. Are you suggesting that the majority of that figure worldwide also has autism? That would be a difficult thing to prove since autism has no medical testing and there's a large margin for error and misdiagnosis, in every country. Also, how studies work, is they have a number of samples, let's say having autism and looking to see who also has seizures. Of that they come of with a statistical figure which is more or less a guess that it would then affect the population of those with autism. But no study yet has sampled every single person with autism to know the exact autism rates, or those with co-morbids.

Co-morbids is just that. Why people try to link co-morbids to autism is a mystery to me as to why they would. Every co-morbid is observed in those without autism.

I can tell you, I am very active in the autism community where I live and prior to my son being born, I was active in adults with disabilities. I know more typical people who suffer from those co-morbids which include seizures, asthma, excema and allergies than of all those I know who have autism, including my own child. My child has no allergies, doesn't have asthma, doesn't have seizures. He did have excema, but then so does my mother who does not have autism. My son outgrew his excema when he was about 8. Many times children out grow childhood allergies, and there are different types of asthma which some children outgrow as well.

Asthma, seizures, excema and allergies all pre date autism and vaccines.
Elias

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#334
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friend wrote:
Forget the low IQ in those with autism. IQ means very little..
Yes I know but 70% of people diagnosed with ASD are reported to be below average IQ. IQ is is still the main cognitive assessment used in schools to determine if children should be transferred to a special school. You cant ignore it. There are moves afoot to start using the Ravenís Progressive Matrices, which tests reasoning, novel problem-solving abilities, and high-level abstraction and is less language biased compared to IQ.
friend wrote:
Where did you get that those with autism have higher rates of seizures than the general population?.
Common knowledge
http://www.medicalobserver.com.au/tags/High%2...
friend wrote:
I can tell you, I am very active in the autism community where I live and prior to my son being born.
In what way are you active? I'm currently looking at getting more involved in the autism community but the parents I came across seem to fall into two groups. Parents of asperger children seem to think their children are better than kids with autism (snob factor). The parents of children with ASD have almost all tended to be parents of boys. I have yet to come across a autistic girl like my daughter for her to play with?

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#335
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Let's take a look at this one, which is much more recent and found nearly a third of people with autism also suffer from epilepsy.
Researchers from the CHUM Research Centre (CRCHUM) have identified a new gene that predisposes people to both autism and epilepsy.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/04/...

Cognitive assessments are used in schools, but every country uses them differently. In the US, kids don't go to special schools due to test results showing low IQ. The test results determine the type of IEP and services the child will have, and what modifications will be made. No one really focuses on the low IQ here, because we know with modifications many children will succeed and we don't need any study to tell us otherwise. My kid is going to be who he is, and low IQ or high, he'll make out just fine.
Most who have autism will test lower on those tests due to disability, but most with autism are quite intelligent, even those who are non verbal. Those with learning disabilities would also test low. Those with asperger's do not test low.

Since this is an open forum and due to harassments on this forum, I wont go into detail as to what I do for a living. I will say asperger's and autism in many ways are very different disorders, and when parents of the 2 types mix, they often don't have a lot in common. It's funny, I've met parents who considered or was told their child was high functioning (which actually is the same as asperger's) and vice versa. Parents perceptions of what each stands for and how society views the 2 makes a large difference.
Are there no girls in your daughters school who also shares her disorder? I never specifically looked for a playmate for my son who also had autism. There are kids he shares services with, but my son cant stand their behaviors any more than they can his. He wasn't at the maturity level to go beyond his own wants and interests. That has since changed as he became older but autism will probably always affect this for those who have autism. Unless the child knows that they have autism, and are older and able to express how autism affects them, play dates often don't work out so well. For years we had 2 very accepting neighbor kids who played with him when he was young, which they were great redirectors by nature and great examples for him. They knew what not to do to make the experience a great thing. It's too bad you cant upload photo's on this site. It was a sad day when they moved but they gave my son a great start in learning how to be a friend.
Elias

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friend wrote:
Let's take a look at this one, which is much more recent and found nearly a third of people with autism also suffer from epilepsy.Researchers from the CHUM Research Centre (CRCHUM) have identified a new gene that predisposes people to both autism and epilepsy.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/04/...
Thanks for the link
friend wrote:
Most who have autism will test lower on those tests due to disability, but most with autism are quite intelligent, even those who are non verbal. Those with learning disabilities would also test low. Those with asperger's do not test low.
The 70% low IQ figure pertains to pre-2013 pre-DSMV ASD diagnosis and not Aspergers...the reported figure has done the rounds for years...
friend wrote:
Since this is an open forum and due to harassments on this forum, I wont go into detail as to what I do for a living. I will say asperger's and autism in many ways are very different disorders, and when parents of the 2 types mix, they often don't have a lot in common. It's funny, I've met parents who considered or was told their child was high functioning (which actually is the same as asperger's) and vice versa. Parents perceptions of what each stands for and how society views the 2 makes a large difference.
The problem I have at the moment is my daughter is very high functioning academically but is quite behind socially. I took her to a social skills class in 2010 when she was 5 the parents of the Asperger boys in the class refused to have anything to do with me or her because she did not speak. In some ways it's quite understandable as they do not want their own children to regress (at least in their minds) by hanging around non-verbal kids. To be honest the boys had little to do with each other as well and didn't speak to anyone excpet their parents. I have only seen one little girl with autism and her mother was in the paediatrician's clinic waiting for a diagnosis. The mother was annoyed with me when I looked at her daughter spinning in circles while watching the ceiling. I smiled and she did not smile back! when she got up to go to the doctor she made a comment that her daughter does not have anyhting wrong with her. I kept quiet.
friend wrote:
Are there no girls in your daughters school who also shares her disorder?
No I have her in a mainstream school. She has yet to make any friends but the kids take turns spending time with her playing games. It came as a shock last year to some of the chidren that she was doing advanced math, I think they assumed she was handicapped.
Elias

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#338
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friend wrote:
For years we had 2 very accepting neighbor kids who played with him when he was young, which they were great redirectors by nature and great examples for him. They knew what not to do to make the experience a great thing. It's too bad you cant upload photo's on this site. It was a sad day when they moved but they gave my son a great start in learning how to be a friend.
That's fortunate. Unfortunately I my wife and I have no family living in Melbourne at the moment. We also don't know anybody with kids the same age.
TBA

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#339
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Elias wrote:
<quoted text>
That's fortunate. Unfortunately I my wife and I have no family living in Melbourne at the moment. We also don't know anybody with kids the same age.
I don't have any personal experience with autism, Elias, but you might find some help from a nutritionally trained doctor.
They are far superior to doctors and specialists, especially in evaluating the gut / autism connection.
My kid had a problem which docs or specialists couldn't help. Nutritional doctor uncovered allergies and deficiencies.
Very expensive tests, but the results are worth it.
MalbarCACA Controller

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TBA wrote:
<quoted text>
I don't have any personal experience with autism, Elias, but you might find some help from a nutritionally trained doctor.
They are far superior to doctors and specialists, especially in evaluating the gut / autism connection.
My kid had a problem which docs or specialists couldn't help. Nutritional doctor uncovered allergies and deficiencies.
Very expensive tests, but the results are worth it.
Probably why he needs a high chair when he posts.
Elias

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#341
Jan 31, 2013
 

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TBA wrote:
<quoted text>
I don't have any personal experience with autism, Elias, but you might find some help from a nutritionally trained doctor.
They are far superior to doctors and specialists, especially in evaluating the gut / autism connection.
My kid had a problem which docs or specialists couldn't help. Nutritional doctor uncovered allergies and deficiencies.
Very expensive tests, but the results are worth it.
Yes, I am very keen to get my daughter to see a gastroenterologist who are gut specialists. As you say many allergies are often linked to gut bacteria.
TBA

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#342
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Elias wrote:
<quoted text>
Yes, I am very keen to get my daughter to see a gastroenterologist who are gut specialists. As you say many allergies are often linked to gut bacteria.
I'm not talking about specialists.
Nutritional doctors have equal training in orthodox medicine and correct nutrition for the individual.
They are very rare and expensive.
They check everything...allergies, deficiencies, stool bacteria, urine etc.
They also favour colonics and saunas to detox.
I find specialists to be very limited.
MalbarCACA Controller

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TBA wrote:
<quoted text>
I'm not talking about specialists.
Nutritional doctors have equal training in orthodox medicine and correct nutrition for the individual.
They are very rare and expensive.
They check everything...allergies, deficiencies, stool bacteria, urine etc.
They also favour colonics and saunas to detox.
I find specialists to be very limited.
Who is mark porno, Barnesy?

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#344
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Gastroenterologist certainly are trained to perform tests, since most GI issues do have a medical test to confirm it's presence. They also would know about nutritionl factors pertaining to a confirmed diagnosis, and they would certainly be able to detect toxins.

During the 2000s internet marketing and infomercials of colon supplements increased, yet No scientific evidence supports the alleged benefits of colon cleansing. Colon cleansing may disrupt the balance between bacteria and natural chemicals in the bowel, and may interfere with the colon's ability to shed dead cells.

These so called 'far superior to doctors and specialists' are rarely covered under insurances, along with when they claim they can locate disorders that no other doctor can find is a red flag to any parent.
Elias

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#345
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TBA wrote:
<quoted text>
I'm not talking about specialists.
Nutritional doctors have equal training in orthodox medicine and correct nutrition for the individual.
They are very rare and expensive.
They check everything...allergies, deficiencies, stool bacteria, urine etc.
They also favour colonics and saunas to detox.
I find specialists to be very limited.
Ahh I see, I'll check our nutritional doctors on the web.
TBA

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#346
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friend wrote:
Gastroenterologist certainly are trained to perform tests, since most GI issues do have a medical test to confirm it's presence. They also would know about nutritionl factors pertaining to a confirmed diagnosis, and they would certainly be able to detect toxins.
During the 2000s internet marketing and infomercials of colon supplements increased, yet No scientific evidence supports the alleged benefits of colon cleansing. Colon cleansing may disrupt the balance between bacteria and natural chemicals in the bowel, and may interfere with the colon's ability to shed dead cells.
These so called 'far superior to doctors and specialists' are rarely covered under insurances, along with when they claim they can locate disorders that no other doctor can find is a red flag to any parent.
Yes it is true that Medicare only covers a small percentage of the fee.
That claim is my own observation, based upon many visits to different specialists compared with a nutritional dr.
I don't claim to know much about autism, only to pass on my positive experiences with them compared with doctors, specialists and naturopaths.

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#347
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Elias- I'd say that parent you encountered was still in denial stages. It's hard when you run into parents at a different level of acceptance. My son at that age needed a lot of prompting when around peers. The social aspect of that would affect either who had autism or aspergers. I have a nephew only 2 years older than my son, and the child's feeling were really hurt when my son was 4 and he was 6. He couldn't understand why my son wouldn't play with him and hid and it's hard to explain to a child that age that it was nothing he did. Things changed though when my son got older. Now he cant get enough of his cousin to the point of annoyance to my nephew.
My son has always been in inclusion settings, his peers always could see there was something different but the were always accepting up until the 4th grade. My son has always known of his autism since the day I knew that's what was going on. He's always reassured by us that everyone in the world is different. His differences doesn't make it wrong, but many don't understand autism or any disability. I have requested and his school do certain things to help kids understand disabilities. A place based where I live offered puppet shows with 3 foot tall puppets with disabilities. They go into schools and educate kids up to 4th grade. I have also printed informational flyers to be sent home to parents, so when their kids came home and expressed things about my kid, their parents could better answer their questions.
The Aggrolite Busters

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TBA wrote:
<quoted text>
Yes it is true that Medicare only covers a small percentage of the fee.
That claim is my own observation, based upon many visits to different specialists compared with a nutritional dr.
I don't claim to know much about autism, only to pass on my positive experiences with them compared with doctors, specialists and naturopaths.
Who is mark porno, Barnesy?

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And this is my experience. Fact still remains, it's suspicious when only a doctor not covered by insurances are the oooooooonly ones who can find medical issues. Not covered by insurances is a huge red flag; they're performance and medical care totally go unnoticed. They often will tell you a patient has a medical issue but lack the explanation as to the mechanisms as to the cause. And the biggest red flag of all, No scientific evidence supports the alleged benefits of colon cleansing, or much of any treatment they offer, which is why insurances wont cover them. An example would be detoxing. Removing the exposure causing the toxin would be far less expensive than the doctor itself, aside from the fact detox can be dangerous and young children with or without autism often cant express what's going on with them.
TBA wrote:
<quoted text>
Yes it is true that Medicare only covers a small percentage of the fee.
That claim is my own observation, based upon many visits to different specialists compared with a nutritional dr.
I don't claim to know much about autism, only to pass on my positive experiences with them compared with doctors, specialists and naturopaths.

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