clothing/sensory sensitivity

Posted in the Autism Forum

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softclothing

Rastede, Germany

#1 Oct 3, 2007
Hello,

I am a therapist, and I work with children with Autism and Sensory Intergrative Dysfunction ages 3-7. I am starting a clothing line for children who have extreme sensitivity to clothing textures and cuts, and for parents who want to stop fighting with their kids about clothes, and who want to find clothes appropriate for varied occasions, that their children will actually want to put on (and keep on!). I have worked with numerous children who demonstrate challenging behavior as a result of being highly reactive to the touch and feel of their clothing. I have been working with parents, children, designers, and cotton experts/manufacturers to try and design clothing that will "work" for all children.

What I would like to hear from you in the Autism community, are your personal stories with clothing.

What are your needs?
How is it challenging?
What do you wish you could find but cant?
What do you wish you could find easier?
What kinds of clothing do you wish you could find (occasion wear, school clothes, night clothes, undergarments, adult clothing)?
What are the most important elements you look for?(flat seaming/seamless? no tags? soft cotton?)

and more?

I want to base my product on what parents/children/people really want and need!

Please check out my website, www.softclothing.net , and/or email Jessica at softclothing@gmail.com with ANY thing you would like to share about this issue!

And thank you!

Jessica
Soft (clothing for all children)
Inclusive clothing, inclusive world.
Chris

Thurmont, MD

#2 Oct 7, 2007
Hi, my son is 11yrs. and has Aspergers Syndrome, along with a host of other things. One of which is a sensory disorder. He hates to wear underwear because of the elastic waste, and binding everything. We've tried so many different styles. He hates socks, and if we do manage to get them on him, the seems have to be almost non existant! No fuzzy stuff: Velor, or cordaroy, velvet, inside of sweatpants, and whats been hard is the interior of our car.(velvety) Yes, i do have a vinyl backseat cover. Any help would be appreciated, thank you. Shelby1750@yahoo.com
friend

AOL

#3 Oct 8, 2007
my child has sensory disorder, but clothing has never affected him. he's the kind of kid that just doesn't notice what he has on. his underwear could be all rolled in a bundle, and my kid just doesn't notice. I don't have trouble keeping cothes on my son, I have a hard time getting it off! what I find as an issue would only be seasonal change.

Since: Oct 07

Nelson, New Zealand

#4 Oct 12, 2007
He could be hyposensitive to touch, as sensitivities run both ways.

For the most part, my wardrobe is well-suited to my needs on the usual day. I look for clothes that are not 'scratchy', and fortunately most aren't. On a bad day, however, when I am particularly sensitive, I find I need to put another top under my school top, and even through that will often find it slightly painful and very distracting. I have also noticed that zip pockets, while exceedingly useful, will sometimes hurt my hands when I reach into them. I cannot wear just about any wool, and the wool I can wear is hard to come across and still can't be worn on a bad day. I, too, sometime have a problem with seams, but only if they are particularly stiff or stiched in such a way that the stitches rub on my skin. If clothing does not move easily, it is a good bet that it is too stiff for me to wear.

I hope this help you.:)
Sharon

AOL

#5 Oct 20, 2007
Thank God for you Jessica

My daughter is seven now (this disorder has been since infancy and worsening every year) and although she is not autistic her sensitivity to clothing matches the hyper-sensitivity that is seen in autism. She is now insisting on wearing only three very soft thin fabric shirts (an emblem on the shirt or backing makes her crazy) no pants a few skorts, no night clothes (she insist on wearing the same cut off fitted legging and one of her three day shirts). Her clothing has to be soft pretty and no tag no seam. Underwear is two sizes to small and one brand with one cartoon character and help us all if they stop making her socks one brand seamless socks. Shoe shopping means going to every store to find ones where she can't feel the arch and the backs don't touch her ankles. The change of seasons is dreaded because we are having difficulty finding pants she will wear or a coat. This child disorder is expensive and frustrating for her as well as us.
Barbara

Newburyport, MA

#6 Nov 28, 2007
Most parents can find clothing that's comfortable, Some Hanna Anderson, some Lands End, etc. and we can cut out the labels. But what I think we need more of is for older children, we need weighted, affordable fashionable clothing. There is a real need for that because it keeps our child calm at school and needs to look non-therapeutic.
roxanne

Canada

#7 Dec 11, 2007
I have noticed my son is extremely sensitive to socks. We have resorted to turning them inside out. Recently I purchased a soft cotton pair he seems to endure a little more easily. He also just wants to wear shorts all the time. He will cry and bawl and I can see how very difficult this simple task is for him. And then other times he wears pants without flinching. I guess we don't have this officially labelled and are feeling a little lost. He is only 4....What should we expect.
roxanne

Canada

#8 Dec 11, 2007
My son pulls at the waist of his pants a lot. Why does he do this? Has this happened to anyone else?
Stephanie

Midlothian, VA

#10 Jan 9, 2008
softclothing wrote:
Hello,
I am a therapist, and I work with children with Autism and Sensory Intergrative Dysfunction ages 3-7. I am starting a clothing line for children who have extreme sensitivity to clothing textures and cuts, and for parents who want to stop fighting with their kids about clothes, and who want to find clothes appropriate for varied occasions, that their children will actually want to put on (and keep on!). I have worked with numerous children who demonstrate challenging behavior as a result of being highly reactive to the touch and feel of their clothing. I have been working with parents, children, designers, and cotton experts/manufacturers to try and design clothing that will "work" for all children.
What I would like to hear from you in the Autism community, are your personal stories with clothing.
What are your needs?
How is it challenging?
What do you wish you could find but cant?
What do you wish you could find easier?
What kinds of clothing do you wish you could find (occasion wear, school clothes, night clothes, undergarments, adult clothing)?
What are the most important elements you look for?(flat seaming/seamless? no tags? soft cotton?)
and more?
I want to base my product on what parents/children/people really want and need!
Please check out my website, www.softclothing.net , and/or email Jessica at softclothing@gmail.com with ANY thing you would like to share about this issue!
And thank you!
Jessica
Soft (clothing for all children)
Inclusive clothing, inclusive world.
My child is not autistic, but she is extremely sensitive to fabric, seams, and tags. Dressing her is a nightmare. I have been all over the internet trying to find clothes that address this issue, to no avail.

She will only wear loose, ultra-soft, worn fabric - usually cotton or capilene. The biggest problem is that she is 8 and wants clothes that are also "fashionable". She currently wears 2 pairs of pants that are black, elastic waist but it's ruched so that it doesn't look juvenile, and very expensive adult t-shirts from Saks, since they are "cool" enough to wear and really soft, and capilene underwear shirts.

Please, please let me know if you get your line started. I'm looking into taking sewing lessons just so that I can make her some clothes. She is just so frustrated.
a mother

United States

#11 Jan 10, 2008
Barbara wrote:
Most parents can find clothing that's comfortable, Some Hanna Anderson, some Lands End, etc. and we can cut out the labels. But what I think we need more of is for older children, we need weighted, affordable fashionable clothing. There is a real need for that because it keeps our child calm at school and needs to look non-therapeutic.
None of those brands you mentioned are comfortable for my son. He hates cotton. I am really needing another alternative.
a mother

United States

#12 Jan 10, 2008
My son likes slick feeling things best - like satiny track pants, but these still don't always work for him. I am wondering if silk martial arts type pants would work for him. He wants an elastic waist - but not too wide or tight. He cannot tolerate cuffs at this wrists or ankles.
We are thinking of making his clothes out of silk or rayon.
Dressing him is a nightmare (for us all). He is miserable and his entire body is hurting - he is shivering and repulsed just trying to lay his shirt on his back. I cannot find anything for him to wear that he really likes. I would love to see a line of clothing for tactile defensive people.... and please don't stop at 7 years old... these kids grow up and will still need something to wear.
Thanks!
Lindsay

AOL

#13 Jan 10, 2008
Stephanie, I don't know if you have Kohl's there in Virginia but they have Tshirts in the juniors section, long sleeve and short sleeved, that don't have tags anymore (they print the tag info directly on the shirt). It is Kohls brand Sonoma. Also, JCPenny brand Arizona is doing this now too. Both brands are very soft cotton, thin with a nice tight weave. It might work for you.
Stephanie wrote:
<quoted text>
My child is not autistic, but she is extremely sensitive to fabric, seams, and tags. Dressing her is a nightmare. I have been all over the internet trying to find clothes that address this issue, to no avail.
She will only wear loose, ultra-soft, worn fabric - usually cotton or capilene. The biggest problem is that she is 8 and wants clothes that are also "fashionable". She currently wears 2 pairs of pants that are black, elastic waist but it's ruched so that it doesn't look juvenile, and very expensive adult t-shirts from Saks, since they are "cool" enough to wear and really soft, and capilene underwear shirts.
Please, please let me know if you get your line started. I'm looking into taking sewing lessons just so that I can make her some clothes. She is just so frustrated.
Lindsay

AOL

#14 Jan 10, 2008
oh yeah, and the seams are stitched flat so they may be more comfortable for her.
Lindsay

AOL

#15 Jan 10, 2008
Not much of a selection but this website has a few things:

http://www.princessensorydelights.com/store/i...
Stephanie

Forest Park, GA

#16 Mar 18, 2008
Sharon,
My daughter sounds exactly like yours. She is turning 6 in April and we have had the exact same experiences. Please email me at stephchadwick@comcast.net. I would love to have someone to discuss these issues with and to see if you have found any solutions to these problems! Thanks!
Jackie

AOL

#17 Mar 31, 2008
Jessica-

I was just telling my sister this evening that maybe I need to give up my profession, and go in to production of clothing for sensory affected children since I have been totally unable to find anything for my child. I hope you do start a line. My 8 year old son has Aspergers/ADHD/Anxiety disorder etc. etc. So many sensory areas are a problem for him, but what seems to be the most disruptive to our life is his sensory problems with clothing (underwear, socks!!(even the so-called seamless socks he can't tolerate), pants, shirts, coats, shoes. I have very restricted items that I buy him that he can usually tolerate (except socks, haven't found any there), but now even what he could tolerate he no longer can. Night time pull-ups a problem too. The intensity of the problem fluctuates, but always present. We're in a very high intensity time period currently. Please include items for both boys and girls, and older children as well. Since you provide services for these children already, can you advise how to obtain services for my son? I have been unable to get his medical insurance to pay for any occupational therapy and the school district occupational therapist isn't doing anything in terms of sensory integration even though that was why I was specifically pushing to get him approved for occupational services. Help! Please email me with any suggestions. I have been reinventing the wheel with my son since he was only a toddler. It took until he was 5 before anyone was willing to actually acknowledge that he did have medical problems. I have been advocating for him his whole life and I'm not getting anywhere. Thanks for any help anyone can suggest.
Heather

Rancho Santa Margarita, CA

#18 Apr 1, 2008
My daughter is extremely sensitive to clothing. She will NEVER wear socks or underwear. We have to have her wear a certain pant underneath all of her dresses because she refuses to wear underwear. She also has her favorites and they consist of silky dresses. Any ideas of where I can find silky clothing/undies??? Help!!
jessica

Glasgow, UK

#19 Apr 17, 2008
im 14 and ever since i was like 5 or mabe younger im not sure but anyway ive allways had trouble with clothes first it was the socks because of the seam then the school uniform now its seams in trousers and i sometimes feel very frustrated because i try to wear fasihionable clothes but cant because i cant get comfy. in certian trousers the frustrating thing is sitting down because i can just endlessley feel the seam its not so bad now but i dont realy no amyone else who is like this, is it that sensory disorder or what? is any one else like this?
CPearl

Portland, OR

#20 Apr 23, 2008
My daughter is eight and we have had morning battles over clothing since she was three. I'll be the first to admit I have almost zero patience with this issue. Every time I try to choose her clothes carefully with all of her particulars noted, there ends up being at least one little thing wrong with each item. SO, she ends up each season with a closet full of lovely clothes, only wearing the same couple of items over and over until they're worn through. I am sure her teachers and classmates believe we do not have the necessary resources to clothe our child!
At any rate, here are her particulars:
No tags (of course)Even those screen printings now used in place of tags should be eliminated, as they too can easily annoy this little wearer.
Everything must be stretchy and soft.
No wide waistbands (this is a nightmare since all you can seem to find are wide bands right now)
Everything must be loose, to the point of falling off!
No seams in socks. Actually no seams in ANYTHING if she had her way.
No fleece-- it is too thick, too hot.
When it comes to dresses:
No Empire waist. This kind of dress LOOKs comfy, but she finds the seam at the chest very annoying.
No collars, no buttons, no appliques, no tie-backs!
If my daughter could wear a napsack made of t-shirt material with no seams and three gaping holes for her arms and head, and NOTHING else, she would!
There are days I'm at my wit's end-- I'm tired of handling this with sensitivity all the time-- I just don't care anymore. I just want it to end.:-(
jessica

Glasgow, UK

#21 Apr 27, 2008
it must be very frustrating for you to try and find clothes that are comfy for her but i also feel sorry for your daughter because it realy is very frustrating to get comfy in certian types of clothes and my mam isnt happy with me sometimes because she buys me new clothes but some of them are uncomfortable and then they are just stuck in the wardrobe i dont mean to be like that but its just the way i am. hopefully she wont be as bad the older she gets because ive got alot beter with it as ive got older because socks dont irritate me anymore its just certian types of seams in tops or trousers (mostly trousers) and when i get home from school ive allways put my pjamas on because they are the most comfiest type of clothing for me or it depends on the material lol! what am i like! but like i said she will probably get better with it, i know she will. good luck. x

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