Asperger's syndrome

Asperger's syndrome

There are 30 comments on the North Texas e-News story from Dec 26, 2011, titled Asperger's syndrome. In it, North Texas e-News reports that:

One out of every 300 children suffers from Asperger's syndrome. The syndrome was identified in 1944 by Hans Asperger, an Austrian physician, although, Asperger's syndrome was not diagnosed much until 1991.

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coldblooded

Wilmington, NC

#2 Dec 26, 2011
I don't like how when a lot of books and websites talk about autism the focus is almost always on "children." Just as many adults have it (although, because of recent improvements in diagnosing it, adults are less likely to be diagnosed than someone growing up now). They should say PEOPLE not children. Autistic children turn into autistic adults.

Also, when this article lists some comirbid disorders it lists "pervasive developmental disorder", which makes no sense because Asperger's in itself is classified as a pervasive developmental disorder(a.k.a. Autism spectrum disorder).

And, no, there is no real evidence that vaccines cause any type of autism. Yes, parents have many times first noticed signs of autism right after their child was vaccinated, but that is NOT evidence. Correlation doesn't equal causation. The fact is that regardless of whether or not a child is vaccinated, that age is just the age when autistic symptoms are most likely to become apparent because that's when the developmental milestones that autism may affect are expected. Thats not to say that there couldn't possibly be an environmental factor in some cases of autism, but it seems to be primarily genetic. Even with my own case of autism/AS I see evidence of this. I was a little weird already before I was vaccinated, but symptoms showed up more and more as social expectations grew (that's just, logically, how it shows up). My parents, while still probably within the neurotypical range, both show certain mild autistic traits similar to my own.. I just have a bigger collection of them and most are more pronounced in me. It's very easy for me to see how I inherited the autistic traits that I have when I look at my family.
FBOMBER

Winnipeg, Canada

#4 Dec 27, 2011
pgh

Greensburg, PA

#5 Jan 2, 2012
coldblooded wrote:
I don't like how when a lot of books and websites talk about autism the focus is almost always on "children." Just as many adults have it (although, because of recent improvements in diagnosing it, adults are less likely to be diagnosed than someone growing up now). They should say PEOPLE not children. Autistic children turn into autistic adults.
Also, when this article lists some comirbid disorders it lists "pervasive developmental disorder", which makes no sense because Asperger's in itself is classified as a pervasive developmental disorder(a.k.a. Autism spectrum disorder).
And, no, there is no real evidence that vaccines cause any type of autism. Yes, parents have many times first noticed signs of autism right after their child was vaccinated, but that is NOT evidence.
Correlation doesn't equal causation. The fact is that regardless of whether or not a child is vaccinated, that age is just the age when autistic symptoms are most likely to become apparent because that's when the developmental milestones that autism may affect are expected. Thats not to say that there couldn't possibly be an environmental factor in some cases of autism, but it seems to be primarily genetic. Even with my own case of autism/AS I see evidence of this. I was a little weird already before I was vaccinated, but symptoms showed up more and more as social expectations grew (that's just, logically, how it shows up). My parents, while still probably within the neurotypical range, both show certain mild autistic traits similar to my own.. I just have a bigger collection of them and most are more pronounced in me. It's very easy for me to see how I inherited the autistic traits that I have when I look at my family.
I agree. The article appears to have been written by a lay-person. Lots of people are willing to share their opinions, even though they may be lacking in facts and information. The so-called link between autism and vaccines is a good example. Although this notion is based on a paper that has since been disgraced, because the research was fudged, people continue to believe. Once something gets written, it can become permanently imbedded in some peoples' beliefs even if there is no concret evidence. Because of the internet, anyone can express an opinion and there are those willing to take it as fact.
Lily

Union City, GA

#7 Jan 2, 2012
FBOMBER wrote:
Caused by vaccines.
I'm sorry but that's extremist bs it's not caused by vaccines it's biological as in possibly genetic.

Since: Dec 11

Location hidden

#9 Jan 3, 2012
Truth Incorporated wrote:
<quoted text>
Wakefield was railroaded and faced a kangaroo court. He was on to something and he was told to keep it quiet but would not. Shows you are brainwashed by media reports and have no clue what was really happening there.
Wakefield was dishonest and unethical. His research was fraudulent.
jones6

Draper, UT

#10 Jan 3, 2012
Lily wrote:
<quoted text>
I'm sorry but that's extremist bs it's not caused by vaccines it's biological as in possibly genetic.
So many people say vaccines do NOT cause autism. No research ever done says it doesn't without a doubt cause autism. I wish people would stop posting their made up conclusions from research.

Since: Dec 11

havelock, nc

#13 Jan 3, 2012
No one has to prove that it doesn't. It's the positive claim that you need to "prove." They've done study after study showing no link between them. so... In the absence of any scientific evidence for it, there's no reason to believe that they do. Prove to me that televisions don't cause autism. You can't. That doesn't mean that it's reasonable to believe that they do.
jones6

Draper, UT

#14 Jan 3, 2012
Coldblooded wrote:
No one has to prove that it doesn't. It's the positive claim that you need to "prove." They've done study after study showing no link between them. so... In the absence of any scientific evidence for it, there's no reason to believe that they do. Prove to me that televisions don't cause autism. You can't. That doesn't mean that it's reasonable to believe that they do.
So you think it is best to go around and draw conclusions from inconclusive research and say things that have not been proven. Point noted.

Since: Dec 11

havelock, nc

#15 Jan 3, 2012
You have no idea how science works. It's not inconclusive research. Science doesn't usually "prove" things. I swear, it's like arguing with a creationist...

Since: Dec 11

Location hidden

#16 Jan 3, 2012
jones6 wrote:
<quoted text>
So you think it is best to go around and draw conclusions from inconclusive research and say things that have not been proven. Point noted.
The topic has been thoroughly researched and no link has been found.

Perhaps you, the person making a claim that is contradicted by the research, should be the one who provides some evidence.
jones6

Draper, UT

#19 Jan 3, 2012
I am glad I have no idea how science works, damn colleges have taught me nothing. Stupid worthless degree, I knew I should have never gotten it. You are an expert and I will bow to your infinite knowledge.
jones6

Draper, UT

#20 Jan 3, 2012
The_Box wrote:
<quoted text>
The topic has been thoroughly researched and no link has been found.
Perhaps you, the person making a claim that is contradicted by the research, should be the one who provides some evidence.
I am not making any claims just disputing the ones that are. I have no claim to make from the research.

Since: Jan 07

Location hidden

#21 Jan 3, 2012
Made up conclusions is funny. That's exactly what Wakefield did. Made up the conclusion, and that's what anti vaxxer base their science on even though many studies have shown otherwise. For instance the Thimerosal theory. It doesn't take a hugely funded study to figure out the autism rates never dropped once it was removed from childhood vaccine, yet they did studies just the same to show that conclusion. It also doesn't take a hugely funded study to answer why then all children who had the MMR do not have autism, yet they did studies just the same to show that conclusion.

The studies and science is out there, but even my neighbor knows without those studies that his 3 children who had all vaccines do not also have autism. That's the one conclusion an anti vaxxer will never answer about vaccines: Why aren't all who had vaccines result in having autism.
jones6

Draper, UT

#23 Jan 3, 2012
friend wrote:
Made up conclusions is funny. That's exactly what Wakefield did. Made up the conclusion, and that's what anti vaxxer base their science on even though many studies have shown otherwise. For instance the Thimerosal theory. It doesn't take a hugely funded study to figure out the autism rates never dropped once it was removed from childhood vaccine, yet they did studies just the same to show that conclusion. It also doesn't take a hugely funded study to answer why then all children who had the MMR do not have autism, yet they did studies just the same to show that conclusion.
The studies and science is out there, but even my neighbor knows without those studies that his 3 children who had all vaccines do not also have autism. That's the one conclusion an anti vaxxer will never answer about vaccines: Why aren't all who had vaccines result in having autism.
Yeah and many people took that conclusion as fact. That really annoys me. The same with studies that show no correlation and the people stating that vaccines don't cause autism. I just get tired of reading people stating they don't cause autism, when no scientist will say vaccines do not cause autism.

Since: Dec 11

havelock, nc

#24 Jan 3, 2012
Nearly all of the scientists say that vaccines don't cause autism. What the hell are you talking about?
jones6

Draper, UT

#25 Jan 3, 2012
Coldblooded wrote:
Nearly all of the scientists say that vaccines don't cause autism. What the hell are you talking about?
You have a quote from a scientist saying they don't?

Since: Jan 07

Location hidden

#28 Jan 3, 2012
What does any one think happened in the Wakefield study? All the anti vaxxers took that as fact. That really annoys everyone. Especially when we know Wakefield wasn't even a 'real' scientist at all.
jones6

Draper, UT

#29 Jan 3, 2012
Yeah and you will gladly respond when people use that as evidence that vaccines cause autism. I fail to see your logic if you don't think it should work both ways. Things are not always black or white. Grey areas exist.

My son met all development goals up until 1 and then he had the MMR. My pediatrician assured me that vaccines do not cause autism. He then stopped hitting developmental goals and regressing and we had to go through the same pediatrician for a diagnosis referral. The pediatrician then quit a few months later and moved to a new area. I will not say vaccines cause autism, because they don't in all cases, I would just hope for the same respect from people saying they "do not cause autism".

Since: Jan 07

Location hidden

#30 Jan 3, 2012
The thing with Wakefield's study, it was replicated a few times, and none of them found that 'new''mysterious' GI disease Wakefield claimed he found.

Fact is, there is no scientific evidence any vaccine causes autism, but there is plenty studies that provide evidence vaccines don't.

Any time a child get's a vaccine there are risks just as there are risks when contracting the disease. Is a high fever/ seizures after a vaccine that results in brain damage the same as autism? I disagree that it is. I would call it an allergic reaction, and no doctor can pre determine who will have allergic reactions to a virus. I have a cousin who had a severe allergic reaction to the MMR vaccine. However she doesn't have autism or any long term disability due to it.

Autism is a broad term and used improperly by many in the medical field to cover a broad array of behaviors. For instance Jenny McCarthy, in her on words in an interview, said her child had Landau-Kleffner syndrome, which just happens to mimic autism and other disorders as well. LKS also is not caused by vaccines. The funny thing about that, is the outcomes of those who have LKS compared to those who have autism and the misconceptions offered making people 'believe' the child had autism and the idea of recovery bsed on a child who never had autism.

There's also evidence out there that those with a PDD diagnosis, the majority are PDD-NOS, which is a catch-all for those who don't fit any where else.

Since: Jan 07

Location hidden

#40 Jan 12, 2012
More spam from the anti vaxxer Noise who cant stick to one name. Nice try, Winnipeg. Extremely funny.

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