Anxiety and Panic Attacks, a Common O...

Anxiety and Panic Attacks, a Common Occurrence in Hypothyroid Patients

There are 15 comments on the BellaOnline story from Oct 25, 2007, titled Anxiety and Panic Attacks, a Common Occurrence in Hypothyroid Patients. In it, BellaOnline reports that:

“Hashimoto's thyroiditis", anxiety was a common symptom at the time patients were diagnosed. There are also studies that have been published on the "PubMed”

Guest Author - by: Jim Lowrance Hypothyroidism related anxiety, is a subject I've addressed in other articles and the number of e-mails I get from patients who suffer anxiety from their hypothyroidism, ... via BellaOnline

Join the discussion below, or Read more at BellaOnline.

DJW

Roseburg, OR

#1 Oct 31, 2007
This is the first instance I've seen of the correlation between hypothyroid and anxiety despite my research into this topic. I'm a 51 yo male and I've been suffering terribly from anxiety unrelated to thoughts or my life conditions. My breathing becomes tight, and I suffer from jitteriness, narrow throughted-ness. I've now gone to a naturopath, (after feeling I wasn't getting anywhere with my primary MD on this topic) started on Armour, and it's better - but still dialing in on the dosage. Thanks for this article, and coming from the health field (medical physiologist), none of the physicians I talked to knew of any correlation either.
Olga

Sutton, UK

#2 Nov 1, 2007
would you please comment on this questionnaire, i am trying to do research in this field right now so therapy can become a permanent treatment option for hypo individuals.
I understand some of these questions can be very personal so if you feel you must go ahead and omit some information, if youd rather answer me personally you can email me at [email protected]
1) When were you diagnosed?
2) Have you had adjustments made to the dosages and types of your medication due to the fluctuation of the hormones?
3) If yes, indicate approximately how often?
Weekly
Biweekly
Monthly
Bimonthly
6 Months
4) Before you were diagnosed did you experience bouts of depression?
If yes indicate how often:
Weekly
Biweekly
Monthly
Bimonthly
6 Months
5) Before you were diagnosed did you experience bouts of fatigue?
If yes indicate how often:
Weekly
Biweekly
Monthly
Bimonthly
6 Months
6) Before you were diagnosed did you experience bouts of anxiety?
If yes indicate how often:
Weekly
Biweekly
Monthly
Bimonthly
6 Months
7) Would you have wanted to seek help for your depression/anxiety or did you find it manageable on your own?
8) Did you seek help for your depression/anxiety?
9) After being diagnosed and before beginning the course of your medication did you experience: depression, fatigue, anxiety?
10) Do you experience depressive states even while taking your medication?
If yes indicate how often:
Weekly
Biweekly
Monthly
Bimonthly
6 Months
11) Do you experience fatigue even while taking your medication?
If yes indicate how often:
Weekly
Biweekly
Monthly
Bimonthly
6 Months
12) Do you experience anxiety even while taking your medication?
If yes indicate how often:
Weekly
Biweekly
Monthly
Bimonthly
6 Months
13) Do you experience a fluctuation in your emotional states (i.e. do you get depressed, anxious) and then find that you need a medication adjustment?
If yes indicate how often:
Weekly
Biweekly
Monthly
Bimonthly
6 Months
14) What are the most debilitating symptoms of your condition?
15) Have you ever been treated for anxiety? When were you treated? Before/after your hypothyroid diagnosis?
16) What course of treatment were you offered? Which did you find most helpful?
JessWG

United States

#3 Dec 6, 2008
The author Jim Lowrance has several on this subject of anxiety and hypothyroidism and he always supports his articles with medical reports. In one of these he quotes from a report that found anxiety problems in people with only mild thyroid problems and subclinical hypothyroids. His article found here: http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art31486....
Quotes from: "Assessment of Anxiety in Sub-clinical Thyroid Disorders", an article by the Endocrine Society of Japan.
Meg

Sarasota, FL

#4 Aug 14, 2009
I too have hypothyroidism. It went untreated for many many years. Many beleive that when that happens a related condition known as Adrenal Fatigue occurs as the Adrenals step in to make up for weakness in the thyroid. Furthermore, many people have found (reading pt. forums) that use of Armour can cause something called RT3 dominance.(RT3 is when your body isn't converting T4 to T3.) It's complicated, but many have found that a T3 med only WITH something to treat Adrenal fatigue is the only way to feel better. Otherwise it does seem possible to 'get the right dose on Armour'.(Try facebook STTM page to read some of these pt forums). Good luck.
DJW wrote:
This is the first instance I've seen of the correlation between hypothyroid and anxiety despite my research into this topic. I'm a 51 yo male and I've been suffering terribly from anxiety unrelated to thoughts or my life conditions. My breathing becomes tight, and I suffer from jitteriness, narrow throughted-ness. I've now gone to a naturopath,(after feeling I wasn't getting anywhere with my primary MD on this topic) started on Armour, and it's better - but still dialing in on the dosage. Thanks for this article, and coming from the health field (medical physiologist), none of the physicians I talked to knew of any correlation either.
iknwurpain

Union City, GA

#5 Sep 1, 2009
uh yea..i can attest from 10 years experience..thyroid certainly does cause depression,,anxiety...etc...ha d it all...especially if you leave it untreated or just stop taking your meds
Bee

Kansas City, KS

#6 Sep 21, 2009
20 years for me Ugg!

Since: Sep 09

Miami, FL

#7 Sep 23, 2009
Have you ever tried ZANAPRIN I suffered so many yrs. with panic attacks and anxiety..but I have now tried Zanaprin(I no longer feel captive its in no way like St.John Warts I have been panic free and anxiety free for about 6 months now..I feel I am in control of my life and feelings without being over medicated,and Zanaprin is NON addictive cant say enough about it...its non prescription and can take all the hopeless feelings away,elimate Xanax,Valium here is a link to read about it

http://www.noprescription-rx.com/ZANAPRIN.HTM...
Bee

Kansas City, KS

#8 Sep 23, 2009
That is expensive.How about kava kava,valerian?

Since: Sep 09

Miami, FL

#9 Sep 23, 2009
Its a bit pricey but the valerian root is just all natural and if you read all the product ingredients you can see the information is right out there for you. What I did was order a months supply I would do that with any new product out there..especially in these economic times. My results were remarkable after the 2nd week, and to be anxiety free to me personally the price is worth my sanity.

Since: Sep 09

Miami, FL

#10 Sep 23, 2009
Fast
Safe
Effective
No prescription needed
All the benefits of prescription medications without dangerous side effects
Not addictive

Active Ingredients
Proprietary Formulation Consisting of:
Beta-phenyl-gamma-aminobutyric acid
Gamma-ethylamino-L-glutamic acid
4-Nicotinoylaminobutyric acid
2-Aminoethanesulfonic acid

A copy and paste from the website.
Panic Attack Education

Parksley, VA

#12 Sep 5, 2010
DJW wrote:
This is the first instance I've seen of the correlation between hypothyroid and anxiety despite my research into this topic. I'm a 51 yo male and I've been suffering terribly from anxiety unrelated to thoughts or my life conditions. My breathing becomes tight, and I suffer from jitteriness, narrow throughted-ness. I've now gone to a naturopath,(after feeling I wasn't getting anywhere with my primary MD on this topic) started on Armour, and it's better - but still dialing in on the dosage. Thanks for this article, and coming from the health field (medical physiologist), none of the physicians I talked to knew of any correlation either.
"Panic Attacks" are caused by a deficiency in your diet.

The symptoms are telling you that your muscles
(including your heart) and organs are shutting down.

I was told to eat pills and ignore the attacks.
I found the "cure" in the produce aisle at the local market.
Mirana

Lodz, Poland

#13 Sep 20, 2012
Thyroid dysfunction may make a person experience many problems such as obesity, infertility and even heart diseases. It is also possible that the person might be anxious of their health. Excessive worrying, however, may bring more physical problems. See http://www.zoloftlawsuithelpcenter.com
Brenda

Canada

#14 Oct 11, 2012
Hello. I'm here for major help (maybe). Sorry for any miss spelled words, I am on a tablet and tablets are hard to control. Last year at around august I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism. Perfectly fine felt a hundred percent better, there was no need to change my does at all. But, the doctor did. He said that it was too low. He bumped it up to 0.125 it was fine at first.( I was first put at 0.100 so this was a big change) I went on for a while, but then I got panic attacks nights in a row. It was awful, I could not figure out why I had these weird thoughts and why I felt so scared and couldn't control myself. Back then I thought I was high, but the I got this crazy thought. That I was going insane, I quit weed instantly I never smoked that much to begin with, I had the normal after effects and my paranoia and anxiety dropped like a brick into cold water. Now they are back up, I knew I was having anxiety and the fact I saw dots at night made me terrified. I did the most research I think I have ever done. About 87 hous so far. I found out what I am seeing is normal. I talked to my doctor and we HD a dispite but I was NOT leaving till he lowered my dosage. I am now at 0.112 and my anxiety dropped a bit. I still get minor attacks that I can coax myself out in a short while. The increase was really two months of hell. I didn't want to live at times, and clearly remember that I was about to kill myself. I'm now getting back into a good group of friends and praying that I change for the better. I would say my doctor did not think clearly, he had about thirty more people to attend so I don't blame him. Be careful everyone you never know what is the right dose if you get severe symptoms talk to your doctor immediately!! Never wait! You know what you are comfortable with! Come to a conclusion with your doctor. Please be safe.
Alessandra

Phoenix, AZ

#17 Jan 31, 2013
Thank for this new piece of information relating to depression. Hypothyroid patients should seek a mental health professional's help to safely and effectively ease their depression. Assistance and guidance should always be provided for the patients. For related inputs on depression, visit link.
Braxton
#20 Sep 24, 2013
I have ordered 2 times from this website PILLSMEDSHOP. COM . I called yesterday the customer care and asked for a discount as i was about to order twice the regular amount.

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Health Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
News Our Opinion: Resources needed for addiction fight 4 hr mrs miggins 2
News Obama grants CDC whistleblower immunity for exp... 6 hr ADVERSE EVENTS 1
News The Link Between Autism And Vaccine Was Complet... 6 hr ADVERSE EVENTS 5
Morgellons - What I believe it really is (Oct '12) 7 hr Code red 201
News National Health Service in Scotland prescribed ... 10 hr bedwetter2 1
News Early Pregnancy Symptom - How To Detect Pregnan... (Jun '07) 12 hr Tonia 366
News Niacin gave me very badside effects (Jan '08) 17 hr HumanSpirit 20
News Pregnancy Symptoms - 12 Very Early Symptoms of ... (Jun '07) Sat unon 6,910
Nudity at doctor's office (Mar '07) Sat Healthy 555 Eddie 96
More from around the web