Sex Without Condoms: Discuss

Sex Without Condoms: Discuss

There are 40 comments on the EDGE story from Dec 22, 2013, titled Sex Without Condoms: Discuss. In it, EDGE reports that:

Moderator Mr. Pam, left, who doesn't use a last name professionally, was joined by panelists Chrissy Scardina and Alan Guttirez at the condomless sex forum A standing-room crowd turned out to discuss changing rules around condomless sex and other HIV prevention options at a recent Real Talk forum sponsored by the San Francisco AIDS Foundation, ... (more)

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Since: Mar 09

Location hidden

#24 Dec 27, 2013
Josh in New Orleans wrote:
<quoted text>
In a way, yes. I provided the intelligence people need to find out what those new questions are. The suggestion of such presents itself in my data as insights about people's collective behavior online. That can yield a wealth of information useful to studying people's behavior.
Any of it focused on the upper end of the bell curve, or just the herd?
thetruth

Enfield, UK

#25 Dec 27, 2013
everyone seems to have gone smarter at copy and pasting. I can change Wikipedia as much as anyone. you should try to develop a thinking process, soo many answers in front of everyones eyes but too blind to see. not because we don't know the answers but because we ask wrong questions.
are u the pupetteer or the puppet on the string?

Since: Mar 09

Location hidden

#26 Dec 27, 2013
Fallacy of False Dichotomy.

Since: Mar 07

Location hidden

#27 Dec 27, 2013
Its Raining Boys wrote:
<quoted text>
Is that why hiv is making a comeback in the US? Yeah snyper, inform the youth about fisting etc and you'll have a society of indigents in 20 years.
While sounding completely unappealing, I can't imagine any one odd sexual practice will cause the entire population to become indigent.

Do you have some stats to show otherwise?

Since: Mar 07

Location hidden

#28 Dec 27, 2013
thetruth wrote:
everyone seems to have gone smarter at copy and pasting. I can change Wikipedia as much as anyone. you should try to develop a thinking process, soo many answers in front of everyones eyes but too blind to see. not because we don't know the answers but because we ask wrong questions.
are u the pupetteer or the puppet on the string?
Google and Bing are everyone's friends.
Gremlin

Louisville, KY

#30 Dec 27, 2013
Truth Be Told wrote:
<quoted text>
So sad you wasn't aborted by your mom. How disappointed she must have been to find out her son was a filthy shiteater.
I'll bet you can't wait until you grow up. Then you can be a turd legally.

“Live and let live”

Since: Apr 08

New Orleans

#32 Dec 29, 2013
snyper wrote:
<quoted text>
Any of it focused on the upper end of the bell curve, or just the herd?
That all depends on the scope of the analysis. Demographics are nescessarially difficult to come by. However, one can group people based upon their communities of interest and the articles they read. All that requires is an algorithm built of keywords of demographic relevance (and the data, of course). It is a processor-intensive analysis though, and could be avoided if not for ethical concerns about collecting personally identifiable information. We only collect the IP address as a personal identifier just in case someone tries to hack us. That does not yield a lot of information about the person, but it does help protect our networks. Personally, I think that is as it should be. We get a limited amount of demographic data that one must use for a sample of the broader population, and then use standard statistical methods to extract an interpretation of those data in a broader context. So, yes... We usually look at the herd, but that does not mean we cannot take a deeper look if required.

Since: Mar 09

Location hidden

#33 Dec 30, 2013
thetruth wrote:
everyone seems to have gone smarter at copy and pasting. I can change Wikipedia as much as anyone. you should try to develop a thinking process, soo many answers in front of everyones eyes but too blind to see. not because we don't know the answers but because we ask wrong questions.
are u the pupetteer or the puppet on the string?
Yes you can, but your changes are posted on the editorial review board. If those changes are inaccurate, they don't last.

If all opinions were equal, you would have your brain surgery done by your neighbor's teenage daughter.

Since: Mar 09

Location hidden

#34 Dec 30, 2013
Josh in New Orleans wrote:
<quoted text>
That all depends on the scope of the analysis. Demographics are nescessarially difficult to come by. However, one can group people based upon their communities of interest and the articles they read. All that requires is an algorithm built of keywords of demographic relevance (and the data, of course). It is a processor-intensive analysis though, and could be avoided if not for ethical concerns about collecting personally identifiable information. We only collect the IP address as a personal identifier just in case someone tries to hack us. That does not yield a lot of information about the person, but it does help protect our networks. Personally, I think that is as it should be. We get a limited amount of demographic data that one must use for a sample of the broader population, and then use standard statistical methods to extract an interpretation of those data in a broader context. So, yes... We usually look at the herd, but that does not mean we cannot take a deeper look if required.
That's tantamount to grading on a USS Titanic curve.

I would be sorely tempted to skew slightly to the right in order to manipulate the companies to target to slightly higher intelligence, causing the herd to stretch itself slightly. Say, 5th grade vocab instead of 3rd.

http://www.npr.org/2013/12/29/257922222/closi...

“Live and let live”

Since: Apr 08

New Orleans

#35 Dec 30, 2013
snyper wrote:
<quoted text>
That's tantamount to grading on a USS Titanic curve.
I would be sorely tempted to skew slightly to the right in order to manipulate the companies to target to slightly higher intelligence, causing the herd to stretch itself slightly. Say, 5th grade vocab instead of 3rd.
http://www.npr.org/2013/12/29/257922222/closi...
As much as I enjoy quantitative, rather than qualitative research, I strongly believe that some things are nescessarially qualitative. For stronger demographics, we could employ a number of techniques, but big data is tricky and I think it unethical to collect peoples' personal data without explicit consent, such as when someone creates a profile on one of our websites. By contrast, companies like Comscore basically use spyware to get their demographics. While the information collected is sound, it is still a sample skewed by the idiocy of people who download freeware (a majority believe it or not). I am not tempted to skew my analysis in any way. My method is and has long been to let the data speak for itself, even if it speaks bad news. Neither do I stand behind the unquestionable validity of an analysis until all alternative propositions have been ruled out, or the trend is so explicit that questioning it seems irrational to an educated statistician. Beyond these common considerations, qualitative methods still hold some merit. That is why we calculate a margin of error. To that point, even qualitative data with a 20% margin of error still yields worthwhile insights. Most of the time, my collection methods, and even my projections prove a margin of error of less than 5%. The thing is, if you have enough data, it matters less to have it all, and especially so when the algorithm used to interpret it has more than a decade of trends to inform it and that information itself helps create the algorithm. Ergo, statistical feedback mechanisms...

Since: Mar 09

Location hidden

#36 Dec 30, 2013
Josh in New Orleans wrote:
<quoted text>
As much as I enjoy quantitative, rather than qualitative research, I strongly believe that some things are nescessarially qualitative. For stronger demographics, we could employ a number of techniques, but big data is tricky and I think it unethical to collect peoples' personal data without explicit consent, such as when someone creates a profile on one of our websites. By contrast, companies like Comscore basically use spyware to get their demographics. While the information collected is sound, it is still a sample skewed by the idiocy of people who download freeware (a majority believe it or not). I am not tempted to skew my analysis in any way. My method is and has long been to let the data speak for itself, even if it speaks bad news. Neither do I stand behind the unquestionable validity of an analysis until all alternative propositions have been ruled out, or the trend is so explicit that questioning it seems irrational to an educated statistician. Beyond these common considerations, qualitative methods still hold some merit. That is why we calculate a margin of error. To that point, even qualitative data with a 20% margin of error still yields worthwhile insights. Most of the time, my collection methods, and even my projections prove a margin of error of less than 5%. The thing is, if you have enough data, it matters less to have it all, and especially so when the algorithm used to interpret it has more than a decade of trends to inform it and that information itself helps create the algorithm. Ergo, statistical feedback mechanisms...
So you're really thinking of dropping that in favor of software?

“Live and let live”

Since: Apr 08

New Orleans

#37 Dec 30, 2013
snyper wrote:
<quoted text>
So you're really thinking of dropping that in favor of software?
Yes, I am tired of people and their stupid self-interests. Honestly, I have become jaded, despite what merit I have to offer. People respect you when good news comes, and try, even sometimes in vein, to discredit a person when things don't turn out their way- a classic example of "shoot the messenger". For now and until I have a PHD, I am done with it. I want to be involved with science that changes perspective, not with the petty self-interests of an employer who shits on me when the numbers don't match their perceived reality. I really mean that. It's been something on my mind a lot lately. I am more dedicated to science than my paycheck, but I still need it.
anonymous

Cincinnati, OH

#38 Dec 31, 2013
Chance wrote:
This article is chilling. As one who was around when the virus first emerged, it is appalling to me that anyone would play around at all with the chance of getting this virus. It is already changing in some regards. Like bacteria that morph into antibiotic-resistant super bugs, this virus could at anytime change into something that defies all the newest developments to battle it. There are already articles about changes the doctors are observing. All I can say is "Darwinism at work." Oh wait, Darwinism is about not passing on genes because the current generation killed itself off. Guess Darwinism doesn't apply here.
Well, actually Darwinism might apply, because those with risky lifestyles, ie drug users and gays, are seeing the increased mortality being imposed by the risk... Thus, eliminating them from the available gene pool. Don't want the risk? Simple, don't engage in the risky behavior.

Since: Mar 09

Location hidden

#39 Dec 31, 2013
Josh in New Orleans wrote:
<quoted text>
Yes, I am tired of people and their stupid self-interests. Honestly, I have become jaded, despite what merit I have to offer. People respect you when good news comes, and try, even sometimes in vein, to discredit a person when things don't turn out their way- a classic example of "shoot the messenger". For now and until I have a PHD, I am done with it. I want to be involved with science that changes perspective, not with the petty self-interests of an employer who shits on me when the numbers don't match their perceived reality. I really mean that. It's been something on my mind a lot lately. I am more dedicated to science than my paycheck, but I still need it.
What kind of software interests you?

Since: Mar 09

Location hidden

#40 Dec 31, 2013
anonymous wrote:
<quoted text>
Well, actually Darwinism might apply, because those with risky lifestyles, ie drug users and gays, are seeing the increased mortality being imposed by the risk... Thus, eliminating them from the available gene pool. Don't want the risk? Simple, don't engage in the risky behavior.
That presumes a healthy adult mindset; sorely lacking in troubled, homeless, addicted teens.

http://www.humanesocietyvc.org/wp-content/upl...

“Live and let live”

Since: Apr 08

New Orleans

#41 Dec 31, 2013
snyper wrote:
<quoted text>
What kind of software interests you?
Just about any kind. If I ever make it to such a point, I would love to write planet hunting software for telescopes. I am also seriously interested in AI. Beyond that, I am beginning to educate myself on the intricacies of cryptology and I even have an algoythm I am working on. It's based on a set of equations I developed- a unique form of algebra that allows performing operations on numbers represented in any base system without needing to convert the numbers to a like base. Wish I could give you more detail, but I have to keep some things to myself. As far as I am concerned, the sky is the limit. I am adept at 10 programming languages now. I can't even imagine how many I will know by the time I am an old man.

Since: Mar 09

Location hidden

#42 Dec 31, 2013
Josh in New Orleans wrote:
<quoted text>
Just about any kind. If I ever make it to such a point, I would love to write planet hunting software for telescopes. I am also seriously interested in AI. Beyond that, I am beginning to educate myself on the intricacies of cryptology and I even have an algoythm I am working on. It's based on a set of equations I developed- a unique form of algebra that allows performing operations on numbers represented in any base system without needing to convert the numbers to a like base. Wish I could give you more detail, but I have to keep some things to myself. As far as I am concerned, the sky is the limit. I am adept at 10 programming languages now. I can't even imagine how many I will know by the time I am an old man.
Be sure to include a completely interchangeable idiot code as a personal variable in the encryption. They throw cryptographers into convulsions, especially if the the decrypted solution points to another idiot code in an ancient language. I particularly like Sumerian idioms. They make Volsung Skaalda kenningen look simpleminded.

Not cryptography, but for fun on the side, these could use some improvements and updating:



http://www.youtube.com/watch...

http://www.youtube.com/watch...

“Live and let live”

Since: Apr 08

New Orleans

#43 Jan 1, 2014
snyper wrote:
<quoted text>
Be sure to include a completely interchangeable idiot code as a personal variable in the encryption. They throw cryptographers into convulsions, especially if the the decrypted solution points to another idiot code in an ancient language. I particularly like Sumerian idioms. They make Volsung Skaalda kenningen look simpleminded.
Not cryptography, but for fun on the side, these could use some improvements and updating:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v =o9AelnSywbUXX
http://www.youtube.com/watch...
http://www.youtube.com/watch...
Ha! I didn't mention it, but I also have a flair for writing a procedure or two in programmetry (code poetry). I could always do that too, but for now, I am focused only on ensuring it is sound. The best feature is that the code is not broken without knowing the base of each encoded symbol.

Anyway, planes? I can already understand that sort of programming, but I don't think the path I have taken will bring me in that direction. I would need more experience at using 3D modeling in robotics software. I can write video games, same principal, but my focus right now is on the mind of AI, with its only sense being text input. Well, I mean at least those are my personal endeavors. I have others.

“Live and let live”

Since: Apr 08

New Orleans

#44 Jan 1, 2014
snyper wrote:
<quoted text>
Be sure to include a completely interchangeable idiot code as a personal variable in the encryption. They throw cryptographers into convulsions, especially if the the decrypted solution points to another idiot code in an ancient language. I particularly like Sumerian idioms. They make Volsung Skaalda kenningen look simpleminded.
Not cryptography, but for fun on the side, these could use some improvements and updating:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v =o9AelnSywbUXX
http://www.youtube.com/watch...
http://www.youtube.com/watch...
Hmm... Had a little inspiration... >:-D

var hereBeDragons = function(fire){
If(sunlight){
return (hereBeDragons(fire)?1:0)}
else{window.sunlight = 0; return undefined}

Since: Mar 09

Location hidden

#45 Jan 1, 2014
Josh in New Orleans wrote:
<quoted text>
Ha! I didn't mention it, but I also have a flair for writing a procedure or two in programmetry (code poetry). I could always do that too, but for now, I am focused only on ensuring it is sound. The best feature is that the code is not broken without knowing the base of each encoded symbol.
Anyway, planes? I can already understand that sort of programming, but I don't think the path I have taken will bring me in that direction. I would need more experience at using 3D modeling in robotics software. I can write video games, same principal, but my focus right now is on the mind of AI, with its only sense being text input. Well, I mean at least those are my personal endeavors. I have others.
Look again. That's SIM. Yes. But the you're thinking of the graphics side.

In particular, Euroscope hasn't been updated for the newest OS's.

Think 3D "Asteroids" meets 3D "Tetris".

Dragons frolic in the clouds
Their fire golden in the sunset
Until the sea darkens them

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