Tiger's future uncertain

Tiger's future uncertain

There are 118 comments on the Calgary Sun story from Jan 23, 2010, titled Tiger's future uncertain. In it, Calgary Sun reports that:

Let's see now. There have been supposed sightings in Cape Town, in Manhattan, in Phoenix, in the Bahamas and, most recently, in Hattiesburg, Miss.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Calgary Sun.

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resident

Lake George, NY

#107 Mar 5, 2010
what about Arnold Palmer??,.

TMD

“Look! Up in the sky!”

Since: Dec 06

Columbus, Ohio

#108 Mar 5, 2010
Federal Express wrote:
Hi Paul and TMD
i play both tennis and golf though not competitively but with some intensity nonetheless.
i have often though it drains me much more in a tennis game than in golf. So if we say Tiger is going to win more majors than Fed, then could it possibily be because of the different nature of the 2 sports rather than the abilities of the players ??
and all the comments and comparisions are moot ?
Paul wrote:
Federal express:'i play both tennis and golf though not competitively but with some intensity nonetheless.
i have often though it drains me much more in a tennis game than in golf. So if we say Tiger is going to win more majors than Fed, then could it possibily be because of the different nature of the 2 sports rather than the abilities of the players ??
and all the comments and comparisions are moot ?'
You are right of course. A number of us have said that it is pointless comparing 2 different sports, but we're doing it anyway, instead of playing them (I speak for myself as both a lapsed golfer and tennis player). Golf differs from many sports in not requiring explosive bursts of energy; but it DOES require more stamina than people realise at the very highest level. Even just walking round Augusta, which is much more hilly than the cameras suggest, is equivalent to quite a taxing hike. And of course the degree of hand-eye coordination required for golf is every bit as difficult as for tennis, albeit in a different way. It is interesting that the fitness fanatics in golf, Gary Player being the obvious early example, managed to have longer careers than most of their peers (I agree with TMD on this point); whereas the John Dalys and Colin Montgomeries of this world are clearly struggling and would benefit from a few sessions in the gym. So athleticism and golf ARE mutually beneficial. Even Nicklaus, who was frequently jeered as 'fat boy' during the 1960s made a conscious effort to lose weight circa 1970 and gave up smoking. If he hadn't, his career would probably not have lasted as long.
Hey Fedex & Paul,

I would agree with Paul, and just add, I am very surprised there are not more "multi" athletes that compete in golf. There are a few NFL players that have said they would like to pursue a career in golf once their NFL playing days are over. Both Tony Romo and Peyton Manning are very good. Romo has a 1-handicapp, and, on more than one occasion, has attempted to qualify for the US Open. Manning is a 3.4-handicapp.

I think just about all golf buffs know about Babe Zaharias, who was a standout in basketball, track and field (she won 2 golds and 1 silver in the '32 Olympics), and, finally, golf, where she won every women's amateur and pro tournament at least once, and through one stretch won 17 straight amateur tournaments. She was also the first, and only, woman to make the cut in a regular PGA tour event, which she did 3 times. Had her career not been cut short by cancer, I'm sure she would have set many more records.

My point is, if you're a good-to-great athlete, you should be able to learn golf, and play well. Maybe not at the Babe Zaharias or Tiger level, but well enough to win a few tournaments.

What do you guys think?
Rruben Rubio

San Diego, CA

#109 Mar 6, 2010
I think that being good or great in one particular sport does not make you a candidate for being good at other sport but I know my self that if you are good at one sport where eye to hand cordination is requiered you have a better chance to be succesfull at other sport that includes golf. But is not a rule, in my 59 years playing the game I have play with some very good professional beis ball,basket ball and foot ball players and some of them did not had a clue about what golf is about.They could hit a ball caming towards them at 95 miles an hour hit the center of a ring running full speed with a basket ball or catch a foot ball at full speed, but they could not hit a little dimple white ball thats is standing still.
Bobby Smith

Largo, FL

#110 Mar 6, 2010
Rich wrote:
<quoted text>
Well, he is not "far above that" considering what he did to his wife. He is still on top(#1) but that will be gone by June unless he comes back and plays good before then. If you mean he is on "top" in the public's mind then sorry, I disagree. For him to be back as far as the public is concerned he will have to win many tournaments and watch what he does in his personal life although I don't think he will ever be near as popular as he is now. Golf has always had an image of their players being 'on a pedestal' and he will always be remembered for his infidelities rather than the good things he does outside of golf. Even if he breaks the rest of the records he doesn't have now there will always be an asterisk, not from the PGA but the reporters, referring back to last Nov. Can he overcome all the negatives and come back to his original expertise on the golf course?, of course he can. Will he?, sure, when? who knows.
Yes Rich, Tiger can and will be starting with the Masters. Infidelity is a laugh. 90% of the guys on tour are out on the town. They are like sailors coming into a new port every week. Get real!!!! I recall in my day Arnold Palmer was one of the biggest stick man going. It sure did not hurt his image. Tiger will always be on a pedestal regardless of what he does!!!!!
Federal Express

Singapore, Singapore

#111 Mar 7, 2010
TMD wrote:
<quoted text>
<quoted text>
Hey Fedex & Paul,
I would agree with Paul, and just add, I am very surprised there are not more "multi" athletes that compete in golf. There are a few NFL players that have said they would like to pursue a career in golf once their NFL playing days are over. Both Tony Romo and Peyton Manning are very good. Romo has a 1-handicapp, and, on more than one occasion, has attempted to qualify for the US Open. Manning is a 3.4-handicapp.
I think just about all golf buffs know about Babe Zaharias, who was a standout in basketball, track and field (she won 2 golds and 1 silver in the '32 Olympics), and, finally, golf, where she won every women's amateur and pro tournament at least once, and through one stretch won 17 straight amateur tournaments. She was also the first, and only, woman to make the cut in a regular PGA tour event, which she did 3 times. Had her career not been cut short by cancer, I'm sure she would have set many more records.
My point is, if you're a good-to-great athlete, you should be able to learn golf, and play well. Maybe not at the Babe Zaharias or Tiger level, but well enough to win a few tournaments.
What do you guys think?
I recall a Michael Jordan tried his hand at baseball after retiring from basketball. I think he didn't make it beyond junior league.. i may be wrong but my memory tells me it is something like that.
It is indeed rare to find anyone who can be dominant in 2 or more different sports. I await that day when this will happen in my life time... but i doubt i will live long enough to see that day....
Paul

Chester, UK

#112 Mar 8, 2010
Hi Fedex and TMD,

I think Babe Zaharias is a good example of an all-rounder. I guess we are now in an age of specialists where choices are made early: I believe players like Nadal and Becker at some point in their early teens had to make a choice between soccer and tennis, and Ivanisevic has played soccer for a Croatian football club after retirement (though how seriously I don't know). Lendl, as many know, is also a scratch golfer who played in the Australian Open. But to really excel in 2 sports like Babe Zaharias did is very rare, perhaps also because nowadays people make enough money in just one sport and have no need to devote themselves to a second.
Paul

Chester, UK

#113 Mar 8, 2010
Another example I've just thought of: Edberg is apparently classified in the top 50 squash players in Sweden. At 44 that is pretty impressive!
Federal Express

Singapore

#114 Mar 8, 2010
Paul wrote:
Another example I've just thought of: Edberg is apparently classified in the top 50 squash players in Sweden. At 44 that is pretty impressive!
Edberg ? wow! I didn't know that ! BTW, who is the top squash player in the world ? Someone from UK or Australia ? The sport seems to have lost its popularity...

TMD

“Look! Up in the sky!”

Since: Dec 06

Columbus, Ohio

#115 Mar 8, 2010
Rruben Rubio wrote:
I think that being good or great in one particular sport does not make you a candidate for being good at other sport but I know my self that if you are good at one sport where eye to hand cordination is requiered you have a better chance to be succesfull at other sport that includes golf. But is not a rule, in my 59 years playing the game I have play with some very good professional beis ball,basket ball and foot ball players and some of them did not had a clue about what golf is about.They could hit a ball caming towards them at 95 miles an hour hit the center of a ring running full speed with a basket ball or catch a foot ball at full speed, but they could not hit a little dimple white ball thats is standing still.
The reason I started thinking about this is because most professional athletes have played many different sports in their lives, and are usually known for just the one that made them well known.

Of all of the "sports" to segue into, I would think that bowling and golf would be two of the easiest. Neither requires a high level of physical activity (compared to other sports), and both can be played, well, at an advanced age (for athletes).

TMD

“Look! Up in the sky!”

Since: Dec 06

Columbus, Ohio

#116 Mar 8, 2010
Federal Express wrote:
<quoted text>
I recall a Michael Jordan tried his hand at baseball after retiring from basketball. I think he didn't make it beyond junior league.. i may be wrong but my memory tells me it is something like that.
It is indeed rare to find anyone who can be dominant in 2 or more different sports. I await that day when this will happen in my life time... but i doubt i will live long enough to see that day....
Hey Fedex,

I think making the transition from basketball to baseball is very difficult. As a matter of fact, I've always thought baseball was a very difficult sport to play. Not the defensive side, but the offensive. Hitting a ball traveling 100mph, on an unpredictable arc, is very hard. Especially since you only have a 2 inch surface to contact the ball, and a blink of the eye to "see" it. Baseball is a young man's game, and takes a lifetime of dedication to just be average in the majors. Jordan was trying to do the impossible.

I would think golfing or bowling would be far easier to pick up if you were an elite athlete. Both sports are geared towards middle-aged participants, and don't require lightning-quick reflexes. The difficulty is getting the proper technique down. I've spent many years trying...

TMD

“Look! Up in the sky!”

Since: Dec 06

Columbus, Ohio

#117 Mar 8, 2010
Federal Express wrote:
<quoted text>
I recall a Michael Jordan tried his hand at baseball after retiring from basketball. I think he didn't make it beyond junior league.. i may be wrong but my memory tells me it is something like that.
It is indeed rare to find anyone who can be dominant in 2 or more different sports. I await that day when this will happen in my life time... but i doubt i will live long enough to see that day....
Hey Fedex,

I think making the transition from basketball to baseball is very difficult. As a matter of fact, I've always thought baseball was a very difficult sport to play. Not the defensive side, but the offensive. Hitting a ball traveling 100mph, on an unpredictable arc, is very hard. Especially since you only have a 2 inch surface to contact the ball, and a blink of the eye to "see" it. Baseball is a young man's game, and takes a lifetime of dedication to just be average in the majors. Jordan was trying to do the near impossible.

I would think golfing or bowling would be far easier to pick up if you were an elite athlete. Both sports are geared towards middle-aged participants, and don't require lightning-quick reflexes. The difficulty is getting the proper technique down. I've spent many years trying...

TMD

“Look! Up in the sky!”

Since: Dec 06

Columbus, Ohio

#118 Mar 8, 2010
Paul wrote:
Hi Fedex and TMD,
I think Babe Zaharias is a good example of an all-rounder. I guess we are now in an age of specialists where choices are made early: I believe players like Nadal and Becker at some point in their early teens had to make a choice between soccer and tennis, and Ivanisevic has played soccer for a Croatian football club after retirement (though how seriously I don't know). Lendl, as many know, is also a scratch golfer who played in the Australian Open. But to really excel in 2 sports like Babe Zaharias did is very rare, perhaps also because nowadays people make enough money in just one sport and have no need to devote themselves to a second.
Another example I've just thought of: Edberg is apparently classified in the top 50 squash players in Sweden. At 44 that is pretty impressive!
There are a rare few (like Bo Jackson and Deion Sanders) who have played both football and baseball well. The great Otto Graham (quarterback for the Cleveland Browns) was also a championship pro basketball player. You would think these kinds of things would happen more often.

I had completely forgotten about Lendl. He played a lot of golf during his tennis days. I don't understand why there aren't more players like him.

Edberg being rated as a top squash player is amazing at his age, but not that much of a stretch from hitting a ball with a tennis racket. If I'm not mistaken, Edberg was also an excellent table tennis player. It seems he can do just about anything that requires the use of a racket and a ball.
Federal Express

Singapore, Singapore

#119 Mar 9, 2010
TMD wrote:
<quoted text>
Hey Fedex,
I think making the transition from basketball to baseball is very difficult. As a matter of fact, I've always thought baseball was a very difficult sport to play. Not the defensive side, but the offensive. Hitting a ball traveling 100mph, on an unpredictable arc, is very hard. Especially since you only have a 2 inch surface to contact the ball, and a blink of the eye to "see" it. Baseball is a young man's game, and takes a lifetime of dedication to just be average in the majors. Jordan was trying to do the near impossible.
I would think golfing or bowling would be far easier to pick up if you were an elite athlete. Both sports are geared towards middle-aged participants, and don't require lightning-quick reflexes. The difficulty is getting the proper technique down. I've spent many years trying...
yeah, perhaps lawn bowling, bridge or even chess ! LOL !!
THE TRUTH

Rancho Cucamonga, CA

#120 Mar 9, 2010
TOM WATSON wrote:
Tiger is a great golfer, but he is not as dominant in golf as his buddy Roger Federer is in Tennis. Tiger age 34 has won 14 majors in the last 13 years. His buddy Roger Federer has won 15 majors in the last 6 1/2 years. That means that Roger won 15 majors in 1/2 the time it took Tiger to win 14 majors! Furthermore, Roger is the ALL TIME MAJORS LEADER in his sport. Tiger needs 5 more majors to accomplish that. Tiger wants and needs 2 things that Roger has and that is #1 Being the ALL TIME MAJOR LEADER in your sport.#2 Having a GOOD FAMILY LIFE. Tiger should have stayed away from the 19 - hole or should I say Holes? My point is SIMPLE ! ON THE FIELD or OFF THE FIELD it's Game, Set, & Match ROGER FEDERER - The ALL TIME MAJORS LEADER in his sport. That says it all!
Wow I didn't know.

Since: Jun 08

Location hidden

#121 Mar 9, 2010
THE TRUTH wrote:
<quoted text>Wow I didn't know.
I finally got it. You've got multiple personalities, all of them boors.
Art

Apollo Beach, FL

#122 Apr 20, 2010
I agree with TOM WATSON…
“Tiger is a great golfer, but he is not as dominant in golf as his buddy Roger Federer is in Tennis. Tiger age 34 has won 14 majors in the last 13 years. His buddy Roger Federer has won 15 majors in the last 6 1/2 years. That means that Roger won 15 majors in 1/2 the time it took Tiger to win 14 majors! Furthermore, Roger is the ALL TIME MAJORS LEADER in his sport. Tiger needs 5 more majors to accomplish that. Tiger wants and needs 2 things that Roger has and that is #1 Being the ALL TIME MAJOR LEADER in your sport.#2 Having a GOOD FAMILY LIFE. Tiger should have stayed away from the 19 - hole or should I say Holes? My point is SIMPLE ! ON THE FIELD or OFF THE FIELD it's Game, Set, & Match ROGER FEDERER - The ALL TIME MAJORS LEADER in his sport. That says it all!”

http://www.golf500.com/
GIFTS for Mom
Get Out

Wilmington, NC

#123 Apr 21, 2010
Mmm the Federer cheerleaders waving the Pom-Poms for the tennis player on a Golf Forum must be feeling left out.
socalgawfer

Trabuco Canyon, CA

#124 Apr 21, 2010
Especially when he is still behind Jack in majors

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