SKOLNICK: NFL's Goodell fighting good...

SKOLNICK: NFL's Goodell fighting good, if unwinnable, fight

There are 53 comments on the South Florida Sun-Sentinel story from Jun 25, 2007, titled SKOLNICK: NFL's Goodell fighting good, if unwinnable, fight. In it, South Florida Sun-Sentinel reports that:

You have to hand it to Roger Goodell for attempting to improve NFL player conduct and the NFL's image.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at South Florida Sun-Sentinel.

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andrew

Lake Worth, FL

#1 Jun 25, 2007
Way to bore 'em, Skolnick. Here, Ill rewrite your entire article for you, it will be much shorter, and much more to the point.

There is a serious difference between being involved in a random altercation with a taxi driver, and being arrested almost once a month for a year, with arrests tied to altercations in strip clubs and shootings. Fact in point, this issue, like almost every other issue to ever be encountered on the face of the planet, must be taken on a case-by-case basis. If Evans' incident seems like it can happen to anyone (which it certainly seems; i.e. i once punched a valet driver in the face for bringing me the wrong car 4 times), then it should be dismissed as a freak occurrence. If there is any hint of repetition, recidivism, or pattern, then players need half their salary donated to charity. Kicking someone off the team isnt going to do anything except bolster the team they sign with in a year. The same way our judicial system is starting to punish parents for their children's actions, teams should be punished for their player's actions. Namely, player stays suspended, and any and all money must go directly to charity.

Copy and paste that, Skolnick.
Tony V

Ocala, FL

#2 Jun 25, 2007
I'm against this.
I'm sure I'll be in the minority.
Before I begin, I'd like to say that yes, I understand the players sign contracts that have conduct clauses in them. However, that's essentially where my issue with all of this starts. I do not think it is right, for any private industry/company to require any sort of conduct from its employees OUTSIDE of the workplace or work related events, unless it directly inhibits your job performance.(If your are in jail, you can't do your job. If you lose your license you can't deliver pizzas. etc.)
If I break the law it is beholden upon the state to levy my punishment, not a company. I would argue that any disciplinary action taken by a company ADDS to the punishment levied by the state, thereby making the punishment excessive. I believe a company should take one of two actions, end that person's employment or simply do nothing. A company has a right to decide who it employs, as long as it is not based on race, sex, creed, religion or sexual preference.
Now I've heard a few arguments that say it hurts the team/league in the public eye. That sounds good when you say it, but really how true is it? Sure, it gets the writers all fired up, and blogs and forums kick into negative overdrive, but that's it if you think about it. The only thing that has increased greater than the ratio of players in trouble with the law, is the leagues popularity. For example, is anyone on this board no longer a fan because of Fred Evans? How about Ricky Williams? Cecil Collins? Have the Cincinnati Bengals' attendance dropped off? If so, is it a significant amount?
Everyone was all aflutter when Goodell passed down his punishments and new league policies. However, how much of it was new, really? There have always been fines and suspensions, they've haven't curbed the behavior yet. Look at Ricky. Look at Tank. Really, that's what everyone wants, is the bad behavior to go away. Seems to me losing your job, is more of a motivator than a fine or suspension.
The issue is how much power should we let private industries have. If you get a speeding ticket on your own time, in a non-company vehicle, it is wrong for your company to fine you on top of the ticket cost. Of course, we're talking about more grave crimes, but it shouldn't matter. If you think it does, you might be letting your emotions play into it too much. Private industry can do this, but without the benefit of judges, juries and a proper defense for the person guilty. To me that seems counter to the foundation of our justice system.
305 life

Denver, CO

#3 Jun 25, 2007
Great rules by the commish, however, I fear as the saying goes, "when the cat is away the monkeys will play." He can only do so much.
trusant

Denver, CO

#4 Jun 25, 2007
"when the cat is away the apes will play"
Bill

Asheville, NC

#7 Jun 26, 2007
My Son play football for Navy one year ( 83 ) and went on to graduated with the class of 1987. They have a zero tolerance policy on bad deeds and drugs, most make it and a few don't, it comes down to how bad you want it, it seems that about 2% (NFL) don't get it, perhaps they can do better some where else where the rules are less of a problem. Bill
BOB

Pompano Beach, FL

#8 Jun 26, 2007
Enough is enough!!! Thank you, Chicago! Now all we need is for more NFL teams to take a stand and get rid of these goofs. I happen to disagree with Tony V. It should be the responsablity of society in general including Corporations, Private Industry, and so forth to fire, let go, ban, any employee who commits and is convicted of serious crimes. Society has an obligation to punish these individuals thats why we have laws to begin with. They are not above it. If they don't want to conform to society then you need to pay! Jail time, Suspension, Fines don't seem to phase these guys so this should be another alternative. Take away there livelyhood and the money.
RooM-212

Oskaloosa, IA

#9 Jun 26, 2007
It is a good start. Earn your right to play this game and be a man. Bashing a system while it is starting is weak.. I like it..
Stephen

AOL

#10 Jun 26, 2007
It's been 4 days since Evans was arrested. Why only 1 story so far? Why isn't his side coming out? Or maybe he doesn't have a side. Still, something a little strange here.
Steve

Ooltewah, TN

#11 Jun 26, 2007
1. It is easy to be critical. What is your solution?
2. The overwhelming number of players who stay out of trouble indicates that Goodell sets is not a difficult standard to live by.
3. Give the guys policies a chance to start working. This is going to be a long term process that will start showing results when the kids in high school who are now watching what is happening to those who cross the line, get into the NFL.
cocoa joe

United States

#12 Jun 26, 2007
It seems like Skolnick is the one who doesn't get it.
Just like the rest of society, rules/laws acts as a deterrent for most.
However, there will always be some for whatever reason, who will not play by the rules.

Cocoa Fl.
Drew

Long Island City, NY

#13 Jun 26, 2007
This is a tuff issue to handle for the NFL.They want warriors on Sundays but choirboys the rest of the week and lets face it look at the age of these guys.
They are 21 to 30 and most of them have amounts of money they have never ever dreamed about.Add in the fact that most of them come from nothing to begin with and losing everything they have and going back to nothing is not a motivating factor.This is only going to get worse as the next geration of me first athletes comes into the leagues.
R-B-J

Vero Beach, FL

#14 Jun 26, 2007
Tony V wrote:
I'm against this.
I'm sure I'll be in the minority.
Before I begin, I'd like to say that yes, I understand the players sign contracts that have conduct clauses in them. However, that's essentially where my issue with all of this starts. I do not think it is right, for any private industry/company to require any sort of conduct from its employees OUTSIDE of the workplace or work related events, unless it directly inhibits your job performance.(If your are in jail, you can't do your job. If you lose your license you can't deliver pizzas. etc.)
If I break the law it is beholden upon the state to levy my punishment, not a company. I would argue that any disciplinary action taken by a company ADDS to the punishment levied by the state, thereby making the punishment excessive. I believe a company should take one of two actions, end that person's employment or simply do nothing. A company has a right to decide who it employs, as long as it is not based on race, sex, creed, religion or sexual preference.
Now I've heard a few arguments that say it hurts the team/league in the public eye. That sounds good when you say it, but really how true is it? Sure, it gets the writers all fired up, and blogs and forums kick into negative overdrive, but that's it if you think about it. The only thing that has increased greater than the ratio of players in trouble with the law, is the leagues popularity. For example, is anyone on this board no longer a fan because of Fred Evans? How about Ricky Williams? Cecil Collins? Have the Cincinnati Bengals' attendance dropped off? If so, is it a significant amount?
Everyone was all aflutter when Goodell passed down his punishments and new league policies. However, how much of it was new, really? There have always been fines and suspensions, they've haven't curbed the behavior yet. Look at Ricky. Look at Tank. Really, that's what everyone wants, is the bad behavior to go away. Seems to me losing your job, is more of a motivator than a fine or suspension.
The issue is how much power should we let private industries have. If you get a speeding ticket on your own time, in a non-company vehicle, it is wrong for your company to fine you on top of the ticket cost. Of course, we're talking about more grave crimes, but it shouldn't matter. If you think it does, you might be letting your emotions play into it too much. Private industry can do this, but without the benefit of judges, juries and a proper defense for the person guilty. To me that seems counter to the foundation of our justice system.
[Tony,this is so to the. I wish your comment could go in the daily newspapers. I just want to comment about wanting kids to be like the sport figures that suppose to excel. I tell my kids to do the ten things God command to be done and you'll be the best person you can be.
dolfan

Palm Bay, FL

#15 Jun 26, 2007
Skolnik is basically saying that since NFL won't be able to change their behavior in the long run, that the NFL should simply let them go on playing without any consequence... great policy there!!! Way to stick it to them!
Tony V

Ocala, FL

#16 Jun 26, 2007
BOB wrote:
Enough is enough!!! Thank you, Chicago! Now all we need is for more NFL teams to take a stand and get rid of these goofs. I happen to disagree with Tony V. It should be the responsablity of society in general including Corporations, Private Industry, and so forth to fire, let go, ban, any employee who commits and is convicted of serious crimes. Society has an obligation to punish these individuals thats why we have laws to begin with. They are not above it. If they don't want to conform to society then you need to pay! Jail time, Suspension, Fines don't seem to phase these guys so this should be another alternative. Take away there livelyhood and the money.
Read my post again, I think a company should fire someone. I don't think they should levy fines or suspensions for crimes committed outside of the workplace.
Rodney

Miami, FL

#17 Jun 26, 2007
It is confounding to understand how many of these athletes come from less than ideal pasts, are given millions from one minute to the next, and still can't help getting themselves in trouble.

It's simply a fundamental lack of respect for the law and I say screw 'em if they can't fly straight. They give all other players (a vast majority) a bad name.

This is supposedly a country of second chances, so give it to them and then kick 'em to the curb.
nice message

Pompano Beach, FL

#18 Jun 26, 2007
can't win, don't try. nice message moron.
PinheadNC

Englewood, CO

#19 Jun 26, 2007
So Ethan, What do you propose Goddell do? Say "Awe forget it! We will NEVER make all the athletes get in line!"??? NO WAY... Just like a fortune 500 company that has a drug policy, you create the policy for the good of all, then you enforce it. There is usually not the illusion that everyone will comply, but EVERY CAN and WILL be subject to the same "rule of law", NFL Law that is. This is good. Athletes need to understand that the game and the MONEY is there BECAUSE of the hard work of those who came before them and the MONEY that sponsors and fan pour into the league. No player, NO 20 or 50 or 150 or 500 players are bigger than the game (remember the WFL - took Czonka, Kick, and Warfield)... NFL survived, WFL died. Players need to be professional or go do something else for a living (for a greatly reduced pay check!!!!) Go Roger! Ethen, you head is stuck in the South Beach Sand.
Rumblefish21

Murray, KY

#20 Jun 26, 2007
You can believe that or you can believe that these stupid athletes will get the message from home or behind bars.It is only a matter of time before the bad ones are eventualy weeded out!I believe that this firm stand needs to continue!No man is above the law and we must not give breaks to idiots that cant act correctly this is a real problem.If you do the crime you must do the time!HELL YEAH!!!
Rumblefish21

Murray, KY

#21 Jun 26, 2007
Tony V wrote:
I'm against this.
I'm sure I'll be in the minority.
Before I begin, I'd like to say that yes, I understand the players sign contracts that have conduct clauses in them. However, that's essentially where my issue with all of this starts. I do not think it is right, for any private industry/company to require any sort of conduct from its employees OUTSIDE of the workplace or work related events, unless it directly inhibits your job performance.(If your are in jail, you can't do your job. If you lose your license you can't deliver pizzas. etc.)
If I break the law it is beholden upon the state to levy my punishment, not a company. I would argue that any disciplinary action taken by a company ADDS to the punishment levied by the state, thereby making the punishment excessive. I believe a company should take one of two actions, end that person's employment or simply do nothing. A company has a right to decide who it employs, as long as it is not based on race, sex, creed, religion or sexual preference.
Now I've heard a few arguments that say it hurts the team/league in the public eye. That sounds good when you say it, but really how true is it? Sure, it gets the writers all fired up, and blogs and forums kick into negative overdrive, but that's it if you think about it. The only thing that has increased greater than the ratio of players in trouble with the law, is the leagues popularity. For example, is anyone on this board no longer a fan because of Fred Evans? How about Ricky Williams? Cecil Collins? Have the Cincinnati Bengals' attendance dropped off? If so, is it a significant amount?
Everyone was all aflutter when Goodell passed down his punishments and new league policies. However, how much of it was new, really? There have always been fines and suspensions, they've haven't curbed the behavior yet. Look at Ricky. Look at Tank. Really, that's what everyone wants, is the bad behavior to go away. Seems to me losing your job, is more of a motivator than a fine or suspension.
The issue is how much power should we let private industries have. If you get a speeding ticket on your own time, in a non-company vehicle, it is wrong for your company to fine you on top of the ticket cost. Of course, we're talking about more grave crimes, but it shouldn't matter. If you think it does, you might be letting your emotions play into it too much. Private industry can do this, but without the benefit of judges, juries and a proper defense for the person guilty. To me that seems counter to the foundation of our justice system.
Thats all fine and well if you are noone but these are million dollar athletes that are on tv every week why shouldnt a kid think it is ok?They are more in the spotlight!You have to watch yourself!
FinFan Man

Raleigh, NC

#22 Jun 26, 2007
Its about time that "everyone" is held to standards of conduct that emplore decency and discretion as it's foudation. Too often heads are turned when a celebrity or athelete is involved.
As a 20 year Military man, I was constantly held to a "double Jeopardy Judgement" where cililian law/punishment and military law/punishment were administered back to back, so the application of civil punishment,on top of Military reprisal such as fines, reduction in pay grade or incarcaration did more to disuade the indescretions of youth more than any single punishment would have.
In other words, a punishment will disuade until the memmory has vanished, but remove the ability to commit the offense,... more often than not (MONEY)and the ability to earn the absurd amount of.... And the problem will be rectified on its own accord.
andrew wrote:
Way to bore 'em, Skolnick. Here, Ill rewrite your entire article for you, it will be much shorter, and much more to the point.
There is a serious difference between being involved in a random altercation with a taxi driver, and being arrested almost once a month for a year, with arrests tied to altercations in strip clubs and shootings. Fact in point, this issue, like almost every other issue to ever be encountered on the face of the planet, must be taken on a case-by-case basis. If Evans' incident seems like it can happen to anyone (which it certainly seems; i.e. i once punched a valet driver in the face for bringing me the wrong car 4 times), then it should be dismissed as a freak occurrence. If there is any hint of repetition, recidivism, or pattern, then players need half their salary donated to charity. Kicking someone off the team isnt going to do anything except bolster the team they sign with in a year. The same way our judicial system is starting to punish parents for their children's actions, teams should be punished for their player's actions. Namely, player stays suspended, and any and all money must go directly to charity.
Copy and paste that, Skolnick.

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