Coast Guard calls off search for 3 missing boaters in Gulf of M...

Members of missing boater Corey Smith's family grieve after they learned the search was being called off. Full Story
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roxygirl

San Diego, CA

#1 Mar 3, 2009
ohhh how sad! I am so sorry for the families and for the survivor who is going to have some very challenging times ahead with guilt, even though he has nothing to feel guilty about. Again, I am so sorry!
later gator

Orlando, FL

#3 Mar 4, 2009
My heart, thoughts and prayers go out to all the family members and friends. I'm so sorry for your loss.
jenjen

United States

#6 Mar 4, 2009
My prayers are with the the family and friends.
Tessa

Sanford, FL

#7 Mar 4, 2009
How heartbreaking... so very, very sad.
NSB

Orlando, FL

#8 Mar 4, 2009
Thoughts and prayers go out to you. Very sorry for your loss.
Caring

Apopka, FL

#9 Mar 4, 2009
What would it hurt to keep searching?
Pachacutec

Fort Collins, CO

#11 Mar 4, 2009
Caring wrote:
What would it hurt to keep searching?
It wouldn't hurt to keep searching, but - and I'm not trying to argue - where would they search? The Coast Guard and other searchers are trained in search and rescue, they have all available technological aids at their command, where else would they look if the boat was in open waters? I feel SO badly for the families, friends, AND the people who searched for the victims; at least if they would've found bodies the families could mourn and try to move on with their lives. From the description of what happened, it sounds like the victims were suffering from hypothermia and became delirious, taking off the life jackets/vests. Very, very sad, indeed.
Pat

Oviedo, FL

#12 Mar 4, 2009
It is a sad situation. As an avid boater myself, there is no way I would choose to discard my lifejacket in a situation like this. I can not imagine that after just a few hours these men gave up and removed their lifejackets. These men were clearly not quiters, you don't make it in sports if you quit. The story does not add up. The last thing a person would do in this situation is remove their life jacket, especially after such a short time in the water. It was all they needed to survive. And why did the family not report them missing Saturday night? A lot of questions remain about this sad story.
Smart Guy

Orlando, FL

#15 Mar 4, 2009
What a real shame and tragedy. Another example that life can be very short. As for those with questions about what happened put your mind at ease. Some of these will never be truly answered. I know it is hard for someone to grasp how fine athletes can just give up when they have been taught to win. It is easy to win on a team, with others and the sport you are playing does not really have the chance of death. In the open ocean with very cold water and 15 foot seas. Your perspective gets a huge gut check. I am sure they gave it their all. But with lack of food and water I can just bet their muscles started to cramp like crazy. They probably lost all fine motor skills which would be needed to hang on. Then major muscles started to fail. Fear can cause so much havoc it is unbeleivable. To survive this task would take skills beyond what a game can teach you. And luck becomes your only friend. Think about the realities of what happened and do not kid yourself that it would have been easy for you. It simply is not.

To the families. I pray you always keep those great memories. Cling to one another and to a living God. Hold tight in your faith.
Caring

Apopka, FL

#16 Mar 4, 2009
The survivor said there was a plane overhead at one point yet it turned out he wasn't spotted. Seems to me the Coast Guard should not quit until there is no possibility of hope!
Pachacutec

Fort Collins, CO

#17 Mar 4, 2009
Pat wrote:
It is a sad situation. As an avid boater myself, there is no way I would choose to discard my lifejacket in a situation like this. I can not imagine that after just a few hours these men gave up and removed their lifejackets. These men were clearly not quiters, you don't make it in sports if you quit. The story does not add up. The last thing a person would do in this situation is remove their life jacket, especially after such a short time in the water. It was all they needed to survive. And why did the family not report them missing Saturday night? A lot of questions remain about this sad story.
I've read of cases of hypothermia in boating accidents, mountain climbing, etc., and apparently victims can become delirious and do things that are reckless and life-threatening. Possibly that's what happened in this instance?
tall tales

Bonita Springs, FL

#18 Mar 4, 2009
The boat was too small to be 35 miles off shore. The life jackets may not have been the proper ones for men as large as they are, there are different life jackets for different weight people. It does not seem like they were experienced boaters. So sad.
Squashthebigman

Winter Park, FL

#19 Mar 4, 2009
Story doesn't add up - they were obviously not quitters. Something else must have been going on?
Boca

Esom Hill, GA

#20 Mar 4, 2009
Pachacutec wrote:
<quoted text> I've read of cases of hypothermia in boating accidents, mountain climbing, etc., and apparently victims can become delirious and do things that are reckless and life-threatening. Possibly that's what happened in this instance?
True hypothermia will do this to a person but for them to do this only after after 2 hours? Its not like they were in 40 degree water.
College Parker

Kissimmee, FL

#21 Mar 4, 2009
Pat wrote:
It is a sad situation. As an avid boater myself, there is no way I would choose to discard my lifejacket in a situation like this. I can not imagine that after just a few hours these men gave up and removed their lifejackets. These men were clearly not quiters, you don't make it in sports if you quit. The story does not add up. The last thing a person would do in this situation is remove their life jacket, especially after such a short time in the water. It was all they needed to survive. And why did the family not report them missing Saturday night? A lot of questions remain about this sad story.
I'm not going to judge the decisions these guys made but have you ever been in 60 degree water for a period of time? Let alone 60 degree water when its 50 degrees outside, 30-40 mph winds with 10 foot waves pounding you? Probably not and you probably can't imagine the pain these guys were in. I just hope these families can heal from this tradgedy.
College Parker

Kissimmee, FL

#22 Mar 4, 2009
Caring wrote:
The survivor said there was a plane overhead at one point yet it turned out he wasn't spotted. Seems to me the Coast Guard should not quit until there is no possibility of hope!
Ummm .. hello ... they took their life jackets off and drifted away. Kind of like when Kate Winslet let go of Decaprio in Titanic. I think there is NO possibilities ... NONE ... ZIPPO!

“News Junkie”

Since: Jan 09

Anywhere USA

#23 Mar 4, 2009
Sadly, it sounds like the other three young men were succombing to hypothermia before they drifted away as it will make you do crazy things, like take off your clothes off even when you are freezing to death.

“News Junkie”

Since: Jan 09

Anywhere USA

#24 Mar 4, 2009
Pat wrote:
It is a sad situation. As an avid boater myself, there is no way I would choose to discard my lifejacket in a situation like this. I can not imagine that after just a few hours these men gave up and removed their lifejackets. These men were clearly not quiters, you don't make it in sports if you quit. The story does not add up. The last thing a person would do in this situation is remove their life jacket, especially after such a short time in the water. It was all they needed to survive. And why did the family not report them missing Saturday night? A lot of questions remain about this sad story.
Those that are hypothermic don't "choose" to do anything as they are not of sound mind.
The Flying Squirrel

Winter Springs, FL

#26 Mar 4, 2009
Lesson here - Always check the weather forecasts before setting out on any trip offshore. Try and pair up with another boat so you can keep contact with each other. I'm afraid this was a case of youth, inexperience, and a lot of cold beer. A trip that never should have been begun.
So sad

Orlando, FL

#27 Mar 4, 2009
How sad. I would have held on and prayed together. Knowing the boat was visiable and that someone would eventually be looking for them. Also 4 guys holding on together would have been more visiable then 1. The survivor must feel awful that the other 3 let go. Sympathies to all the families.

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