harrison-massaquoi-hit-jg.jpg

harrison-massaquoi-hit-jg.jpg

There are 22 comments on the The Plain Dealer story from Oct 19, 2010, titled harrison-massaquoi-hit-jg.jpg. In it, The Plain Dealer reports that:

When Pittsburgh's James Harrison decked the Browns' Mohamed Massaquoi, the officials seemed to stare at the play ... and then at each other.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at The Plain Dealer.

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Fujita

United States

#1 Oct 20, 2010

“The Lombardi Sixpack”

Since: Feb 08

Butler, PA

#2 Oct 20, 2010
what a bunch of bs. play flag football if you want but don't hamstring the defenders.
Kevin

United States

#3 Oct 21, 2010
Steelers have always been dirty there fans don't know right from wrong. That was wrong, even if it didn't bother Cribbs it was wrong. I don't know when everyone started being taught dirty hits are OK. The Parents or whoever that are teaching their kids such poor sportsmanship are failing their kids.

This isn't his first dirty hit either.

If that thug wants to leave than good luck to him, but I guarentee he will be in dead or prison soon either way.

“The Lombardi Sixpack”

Since: Feb 08

Butler, PA

#4 Oct 21, 2010
Kevin wrote:
Steelers have always been dirty there fans don't know right from wrong. That was wrong, even if it didn't bother Cribbs it was wrong. I don't know when everyone started being taught dirty hits are OK. The Parents or whoever that are teaching their kids such poor sportsmanship are failing their kids.
This isn't his first dirty hit either.
If that thug wants to leave than good luck to him, but I guarentee he will be in dead or prison soon either way.
did you ever play football? sound like no to me. cribbs didn't think it was dirty because it wasn't. case closed.

Since: Apr 07

United States

#5 Oct 21, 2010
Bob Roberts wrote:
what a bunch of bs. play flag football if you want but don't hamstring the defenders.
When a player is crippled, or dies, it become a whole lot more than just a game.

If YOU were Massaquoi you could be in a hospital with a swelled brain, or dead due to a bascaluar skull fracture. Helmet to helmet injury/crippling and death is more common than we realize. It happens dozens of times a year at various levels.

You remember: Force = Mass X Accecleration.

In Harrison, you have a 250lb man who can run the 40 faster than you can get out of a lounge chair. If he is at top speed that force compounds his weight times over. If he launches his head onto another head, his head does not give, but the other does.
I do not know what your life experience is, but more than a few people have not come back from such a hit. That kid at Rutgers who was paralyzed over the weekend should be a reminder to you. It certanly was to the NFL. Nothing messes up a football game like seeing a player being carted off the field with his head imobilized.

Sure you take a risk as a football player, but that does not justify dangerous techniques that should not be taught, or accepted by coaches. Its easy for you to say "turn them loose" as long as its not your kid being carted off the field.

Nobody's life is worth a game.

“The Lombardi Sixpack”

Since: Feb 08

Butler, PA

#6 Oct 22, 2010
MarkL5 wrote:
<quoted text>
When a player is crippled, or dies, it become a whole lot more than just a game.
If YOU were Massaquoi you could be in a hospital with a swelled brain, or dead due to a bascaluar skull fracture. Helmet to helmet injury/crippling and death is more common than we realize. It happens dozens of times a year at various levels.
You remember: Force = Mass X Accecleration.
In Harrison, you have a 250lb man who can run the 40 faster than you can get out of a lounge chair. If he is at top speed that force compounds his weight times over. If he launches his head onto another head, his head does not give, but the other does.
I do not know what your life experience is, but more than a few people have not come back from such a hit. That kid at Rutgers who was paralyzed over the weekend should be a reminder to you. It certanly was to the NFL. Nothing messes up a football game like seeing a player being carted off the field with his head imobilized.
Sure you take a risk as a football player, but that does not justify dangerous techniques that should not be taught, or accepted by coaches. Its easy for you to say "turn them loose" as long as its not your kid being carted off the field.
Nobody's life is worth a game.
i think the athletes are aware of the risk. look at your avatar. how safe is it to ride a motorcycle at high speeds or drive a car over 150 mph?
nobody wants to see a player killed or a racer for that matter. the risk is inherent to the sport and i might add the monetary compensation.
the kid at rutgers' problem was poor technique going into the contact. i feel bad for him but look at realistically...how many nfl players have been paralyzed on the field after all these years? we both know the answer...1. having said that i'm all for the refs enforcing spearing with the helmet i just hate these knee jerk reactions that cripple the Ds chance to play the game. let them play, call the fouls and be done with it.

Since: Apr 07

United States

#7 Oct 22, 2010
Bob Roberts wrote:
<quoted text>
i think the athletes are aware of the risk. look at your avatar. how safe is it to ride a motorcycle at high speeds or drive a car over 150 mph?
nobody wants to see a player killed or a racer for that matter. the risk is inherent to the sport and i might add the monetary compensation.
the kid at rutgers' problem was poor technique going into the contact. i feel bad for him but look at realistically...how many nfl players have been paralyzed on the field after all these years? we both know the answer...1. having said that i'm all for the refs enforcing spearing with the helmet i just hate these knee jerk reactions that cripple the Ds chance to play the game. let them play, call the fouls and be done with it.
All athletes are aware of risk. That is a no-brainer. If you play the game NOT aware, then you are inteligence deficient.

The problem with most athletes is they think that cripling injury of this type cannot happent to them. It is not a frequent injury, so they basically ignore it.

If one crippling injury happens, it one too many. To dismiss a low rate of crippling injury as acceptable is ludicrus. If that was your kid, you would be on Larry King telling the world that you want a more concerted effort in the eradication of these types of injury.

But let's get aside from this subject a sec and understand that Helmet to helmet technique is also a culprit in the world of brain injury. Some injuries, that manifest themselves in attempts at suiside, as in the case of the the linebacker at the Univ. of PA, earler this year.

Retired NFL players like Hall of Fame Tight End John Mackey today get very little money from his NFL pension to handle his case of critical dimensia. The NFL is a business that is showing that they cared very little in the past about the result of these hits, and that year by year, more players are either killing themselves (such at Mike Webster did) or barely living a useful life like Mackey is.

The "shake it off" mentality of football is killing people, either fast or slow. And although the players for the most part know the risk of this, it is still the RESPONSIBILITY of those who administrate to be a governmental force for those who are wreckless, as well as those who are not.

I do not care to dismiss the cripling of human-beings as occupational hazzard. If you do, then fine. A life must be more important than giving you your thrills on Friday, Saturday or Sunday. I've played the game, and eventhough I assumed the risk, my mom was scared to death for my safety. For each player you watch taking that risk, there are dozens of people you know nothing about who take that hit just as hard.

The NFL owes them a little more piece of mind.

“The Lombardi Sixpack”

Since: Feb 08

Butler, PA

#8 Oct 22, 2010
MarkL5 wrote:
<quoted text>
All athletes are aware of risk. That is a no-brainer. If you play the game NOT aware, then you are inteligence deficient.
The problem with most athletes is they think that cripling injury of this type cannot happent to them. It is not a frequent injury, so they basically ignore it.
If one crippling injury happens, it one too many. To dismiss a low rate of crippling injury as acceptable is ludicrus. If that was your kid, you would be on Larry King telling the world that you want a more concerted effort in the eradication of these types of injury.
But let's get aside from this subject a sec and understand that Helmet to helmet technique is also a culprit in the world of brain injury. Some injuries, that manifest themselves in attempts at suiside, as in the case of the the linebacker at the Univ. of PA, earler this year.
Retired NFL players like Hall of Fame Tight End John Mackey today get very little money from his NFL pension to handle his case of critical dimensia. The NFL is a business that is showing that they cared very little in the past about the result of these hits, and that year by year, more players are either killing themselves (such at Mike Webster did) or barely living a useful life like Mackey is.
The "shake it off" mentality of football is killing people, either fast or slow. And although the players for the most part know the risk of this, it is still the RESPONSIBILITY of those who administrate to be a governmental force for those who are wreckless, as well as those who are not.
I do not care to dismiss the cripling of human-beings as occupational hazzard. If you do, then fine. A life must be more important than giving you your thrills on Friday, Saturday or Sunday. I've played the game, and eventhough I assumed the risk, my mom was scared to death for my safety. For each player you watch taking that risk, there are dozens of people you know nothing about who take that hit just as hard.
The NFL owes them a little more piece of mind.
it begs the question what of the crippling injuries to race car drivers? or motorcycle racers? Do you watch the races? more have died in that sport than in football that's a "no-brainer".... look at you avatar dude. If you're going to get on your high horse then take yourself to task first.

Football f's up players even if they don't get knocked out. Chris Henry had a diseased brain from too much head trauma but had never been concussed (as far as anyone knew). linemen bang heads every play. the small impacts are just as bad as the big ones over time. life is full of risks, do you know how long career pilots live after they retire? do some research it is very startling. they are exposed to massive radiation year after year. if someone wants to play football or fly planes, that's their business. i love the sport and will continue to watch it. would i let my son play? hell no. so where does that leave the league? good question. earlier this week they were selling pictures of harrison's hit on the browns receiver. go figure.

Since: Apr 07

Decatur, GA

#9 Oct 23, 2010
Bob Roberts wrote:
<quoted text>
it begs the question what of the crippling injuries to race car drivers? or motorcycle racers? Do you watch the races? more have died in that sport than in football that's a "no-brainer".... look at you avatar dude. If you're going to get on your high horse then take yourself to task first.
Football f's up players even if they don't get knocked out. Chris Henry had a diseased brain from too much head trauma but had never been concussed (as far as anyone knew). linemen bang heads every play. the small impacts are just as bad as the big ones over time. life is full of risks, do you know how long career pilots live after they retire? do some research it is very startling. they are exposed to massive radiation year after year. if someone wants to play football or fly planes, that's their business. i love the sport and will continue to watch it. would i let my son play? hell no. so where does that leave the league? good question. earlier this week they were selling pictures of harrison's hit on the browns receiver. go figure.
Do you recall the last major death in NASCAR?

February 18, 2001 - Daytona 500, Dale Earnhardt Sr. The result of that accident brought about sweeping design changes in car construction, safety requirements to not only what a driver wears, but to wall construction at the tracks of NASCAR.

2001 to now is almost ten years, and though there have been major wrecks, and major injury, no NASCAR driver in the top three tournin series has lost their ability to function, or been killed.

My Avatar is that of Lewis Hamilton, 2008 Formula One World Driving Champion. The FIA, the governing body of the sport, after the death of Ayrton Senna went to the process of redesigning cars and tracks in an effort to turn around the trend of not being ahead of the curve when it comes to safety. In other words, it makes no sense for cars to be faster than our ability to make them safe, also it makes no sense to make cars faster than our ability to make the tracks they race on incapable to do so as well.

Since this determined effort, no GP driver has lost his life in an F1 event.

Yes, racing is still dangerous, and though we have seen deaths at Indy over the last 10 years, not nearly at the regular rate we used to. Speed has been slowed, cars are safer, and walls are softer.

Back to football...

The problem is that we have stronger helmets, faster, bigger athletes, and we have decided to no longer teach players at every level (including the NFL) how to tackle.

We now say "HIT."

This is about collisions, instead of wrapping up and driving a ball carrier to the ground. This is a mentality that young players have now gotten themselves into. They want to make explosive plays that endanger themselves as well as the opponent.

It is an unsafe mentality, and if we as fans endorce it, then we too are a part of the problem. People don't go to racetracks anymore to see drivers die, we should not be going to games to see players get crippled.

Both are non-acceptable. It is not sport.
Kevin

United States

#10 Oct 29, 2010
Harrison is just another over paid thug, he will be in prison in two years. What a crack head and then he goes and cries because he says the NFL isn't letting him do his jobs. Does that mean the only way he can do his job is by hitting helmet to helmet? What about the shoulder or hitting them in the gut.

Harrison seems to fit well on the team of thugs and rapists.
Kevin

United States

#11 Oct 29, 2010
Bob Roberts is the perfect example of the first post I made he is making every excuse because no matter what the Steelers do he will find some way to justify it to make him right, that is some sick in the head thinking. Nascar and being hit in the head by a helmet isn't even a good comparison.

Since: Feb 08

Harrisburg, PA

#12 Oct 29, 2010
MarkL5 wrote:
<quoted text>
When a player is crippled, or dies, it become a whole lot more than just a game.
If YOU were Massaquoi you could be in a hospital with a swelled brain, or dead due to a bascaluar skull fracture. Helmet to helmet injury/crippling and death is more common than we realize. It happens dozens of times a year at various levels.
You remember: Force = Mass X Accecleration.
In Harrison, you have a 250lb man who can run the 40 faster than you can get out of a lounge chair. If he is at top speed that force compounds his weight times over. If he launches his head onto another head, his head does not give, but the other does.
I do not know what your life experience is, but more than a few people have not come back from such a hit. That kid at Rutgers who was paralyzed over the weekend should be a reminder to you. It certanly was to the NFL. Nothing messes up a football game like seeing a player being carted off the field with his head imobilized.
Sure you take a risk as a football player, but that does not justify dangerous techniques that should not be taught, or accepted by coaches. Its easy for you to say "turn them loose" as long as its not your kid being carted off the field.
Nobody's life is worth a game.
Players have been playing this game for a long time. It has been a high collision sport, sometimes with not the best outcomes, for decades. To simply say now- today- is the very moment it must cease is extemely over reactionary in the least. Players are being hailed for the very thing you say is so wrong on the NFL Network's top 100 players of All Time telecast. To simply pick and choose who and when you want to come down on, as has been done, is totally unethical. To applaud players in the past- and allow a current player- to play in the same manner while punishing others makes no sense. It's football. If you don't like it- don't watch. I assure you, those of us that do, will relish it as long as it keeps it violent vs. artistic battles.

Since: Feb 08

Harrisburg, PA

#13 Oct 29, 2010
MarkL5 wrote:
<quoted text>
All athletes are aware of risk. That is a no-brainer. If you play the game NOT aware, then you are inteligence deficient.
The problem with most athletes is they think that cripling injury of this type cannot happent to them. It is not a frequent injury, so they basically ignore it.
If one crippling injury happens, it one too many. To dismiss a low rate of crippling injury as acceptable is ludicrus. If that was your kid, you would be on Larry King telling the world that you want a more concerted effort in the eradication of these types of injury.
But let's get aside from this subject a sec and understand that Helmet to helmet technique is also a culprit in the world of brain injury. Some injuries, that manifest themselves in attempts at suiside, as in the case of the the linebacker at the Univ. of PA, earler this year.
Retired NFL players like Hall of Fame Tight End John Mackey today get very little money from his NFL pension to handle his case of critical dimensia. The NFL is a business that is showing that they cared very little in the past about the result of these hits, and that year by year, more players are either killing themselves (such at Mike Webster did) or barely living a useful life like Mackey is.
The "shake it off" mentality of football is killing people, either fast or slow. And although the players for the most part know the risk of this, it is still the RESPONSIBILITY of those who administrate to be a governmental force for those who are wreckless, as well as those who are not.
I do not care to dismiss the cripling of human-beings as occupational hazzard. If you do, then fine. A life must be more important than giving you your thrills on Friday, Saturday or Sunday. I've played the game, and eventhough I assumed the risk, my mom was scared to death for my safety. For each player you watch taking that risk, there are dozens of people you know nothing about who take that hit just as hard.
The NFL owes them a little more piece of mind.
If one crippling injury is too many, than they must stop playing the game immediately! They have already had crippling injuries. A man has also died. There also, unfortunately, will be another crippling injury at some point no matter how watered down the action becomes. That would certainly mean you are in favor of the league shutting down, no? I have a better idea. How about those that are so concerned simply leave the room if you will, and let us enjoy the game we love- as is. Go make your on game. I'm sure it will be compelling.
steeler fan

Marion, OH

#14 Oct 31, 2010
Kevin wrote:
Bob Roberts is the perfect example of the first post I made he is making every excuse because no matter what the Steelers do he will find some way to justify it to make him right, that is some sick in the head thinking. Nascar and being hit in the head by a helmet isn't even a good comparison.
The hit was not done on purpose to injure someone. It's FOOTBALL if the roles were reversed would you still say thats some sick in the head thinking? I think not..........
steeler fan

Marion, OH

#15 Oct 31, 2010
Kevin wrote:
Harrison is just another over paid thug, he will be in prison in two years. What a crack head and then he goes and cries because he says the NFL isn't letting him do his jobs. Does that mean the only way he can do his job is by hitting helmet to helmet? What about the shoulder or hitting them in the gut.
Harrison seems to fit well on the team of thugs and rapists.
These comments are just so sad.......... and pathetic
Kevin

United States

#16 Nov 9, 2010
Bob Roberts wrote:
<quoted text>
did you ever play football? sound like no to me. cribbs didn't think it was dirty because it wasn't. case closed.
Cribbs is a humble guy, is isn't going to whine about it he is tough, but that was a bullshit hit. Harrison did whine because he is a thug and has to cry about it like a punk when they don't let him hit dirty.

Why do people from pittsburgh have no sense of right and wrong. That is why everyone thinks Pittsburgh fans are scummy douchebags. Good luck with the thugs and rapists on your team.
Kevin

United States

#17 Nov 9, 2010
MarkL5 wrote:
<quoted text>
When a player is crippled, or dies, it become a whole lot more than just a game.
If YOU were Massaquoi you could be in a hospital with a swelled brain, or dead due to a bascaluar skull fracture. Helmet to helmet injury/crippling and death is more common than we realize. It happens dozens of times a year at various levels.
You remember: Force = Mass X Accecleration.
In Harrison, you have a 250lb man who can run the 40 faster than you can get out of a lounge chair. If he is at top speed that force compounds his weight times over. If he launches his head onto another head, his head does not give, but the other does.
I do not know what your life experience is, but more than a few people have not come back from such a hit. That kid at Rutgers who was paralyzed over the weekend should be a reminder to you. It certanly was to the NFL. Nothing messes up a football game like seeing a player being carted off the field with his head imobilized.
Sure you take a risk as a football player, but that does not justify dangerous techniques that should not be taught, or accepted by coaches. Its easy for you to say "turn them loose" as long as its not your kid being carted off the field.
Nobody's life is worth a game.
I agree 100%

Since: Dec 08

Latrobe, PA

#18 Nov 9, 2010
Kevin wrote:
<quoted text>
Cribbs is a humble guy, is isn't going to whine about it he is tough, but that was a bullshit hit. Harrison did whine because he is a thug and has to cry about it like a punk when they don't let him hit dirty.
Why do people from pittsburgh have no sense of right and wrong. That is why everyone thinks Pittsburgh fans are scummy douchebags. Good luck with the thugs and rapists on your team.
In case you missed it, both Jon Gruden and Ron Jaworski from the MNF crew, stated clearly, that while hits on Cribbs and (more-so ) on Massaquoi were ruled by the league office appropriately (fined on the Massaquoi tackle, not Cribbs), these were not dirty hits.

Since: Feb 08

Harrisburg, PA

#19 Nov 9, 2010
Biff 33 wrote:
<quoted text>In case you missed it, both Jon Gruden and Ron Jaworski from the MNF crew, stated clearly, that while hits on Cribbs and (more-so ) on Massaquoi were ruled by the league office appropriately (fined on the Massaquoi tackle, not Cribbs), these were not dirty hits.
Yeah. It has absolutely nothing to do with being a Steeler fan or not. I also stand behind the hits on Jackson and Collie as being clean, while understanding that Merriweather and Collins should have been fined.
Crown of the helmet, purposely put to the head of another player = fine. No fuss, no muss. Now let them play ball!

Since: Dec 08

Latrobe, PA

#20 Nov 9, 2010
Kevin wrote:
<quoted text>
Cribbs is a humble guy, is isn't going to whine about it he is tough, but that was a bullshit hit. Harrison did whine because he is a thug and has to cry about it like a punk when they don't let him hit dirty.
Why do people from pittsburgh have no sense of right and wrong. That is why everyone thinks Pittsburgh fans are scummy douchebags. Good luck with the thugs and rapists on your team.
What is your definition of humble? Did Cribbs recently as last year, nearly holdout for a time, because of a contract he signed?

But I don't want to rip Cribbs, because I like the player. Aren't he and Harrison from the same school, if so, how can they be so different in one being humble and one being a thug?

Harrison was cut 4 times (3 by Pittsburgh, 1 by Baltimore), that would be humbling. Turning down a $50M Marketing/Advertising Contract (Harrison) is humbling...

I think you just hate Pittsburgh...that's fine. Not everyone has to like us. But don't throw out irresponsible blather to make some sort of ridiculous point.

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