La Cocina Puertorrique a in Pembroke Pines: Puerto Rican...

Feb 25, 2014 | Posted by: roboblogger | Full story: Broward-Palm Beach

Nelyson De Jesus is an imposing man with a goatee, a lip piercing, and a wide, infectious smile.

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1 - 8 of 8 Comments Last updated Mar 4, 2014
Jorge

San Juan, Puerto Rico

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Mar 3, 2014
 

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This report provides background information on the School of the Americas, a U.S. Army training facility, largely for Spanish-speaking Latin American cadets and officers, located at Fort Benning, Georgia. It reviews the history and background of the School, discusses its missions, and examines several controversies that have developed in recent years. These include concerns about the School's graduates who have been implicated in human rights violations and the adequacy of human rights training at the School. Questions over continued funding of the School of the Americas were raised in Congress in 1993 and will likely be raised again in 1994. On September 30, 1993, the House rejected an amendment to the FY1994 Defense Appropriations measure (P.L. 103-139, H.R. 3116) that would have cut $2.9 million from the Army's operation and maintenance account, an amount equal to the amount in the account dedicated to running the School. In 1994, further legislative attempts to close the School may again target the Army's operation and maintenance account as well as another funding source for the School -- International Military Education and Training (IMET) program funds -- provided through foreign assistance legislation.

As reflected in the 1993 debate, most concerns about the School have centered on graduates who have been implicated in--or are alleged to be responsible for-human rights violations in their countries. According to critics, the School has a history and tradition of abusive graduates who violate human rights. Observers point out that School alumni include: 48 out of 69 Salvadoran military members cited in the U.N. Truth Commission's report on El Salvador for involvement in human rights violations (including 19 of 27 military members implicated in the 1989 murder of six Jesuit priests), 2 and more than 100 Colombian military officers alleged to be responsible for human rights violations by a 1992 report issued by several
Allan

United States

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Mar 4, 2014
 

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Do penguins hold their breath when they dive or do they slowly release it the deeper they go down in the ocean ?

Since: Sep 10

Yunited States, North America

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#8
Mar 4, 2014
 

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Allan wrote:
Do penguins hold their breath when they dive or do they slowly release it the deeper they go down in the ocean ?
I have noticed in Caguabo very few speak English. I hope this post finds you doing well.
Kelly

Wayne, MI

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Mar 4, 2014
 

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machuelo arriba wrote:
That doesn't look like a decent alcapurria. LOL!.. Much too dark. Either the oil was too hot and or over used. Or too much achoite and sazon was used in the masa.....(I personally don't like MSG in masa...The masa should speak for itself just by its freshness)

The consistency of the alcappuria from just that picture alone looks much too rough.

That was not a good showcase piece to accompany this article.

You have to use a small yautia for every two yucca. Along with a couple of green bananas.

A fritura sounds quite easy to prepare....But, it's not. An art much like everything else cretive...Pay careful attention to the heat of the oil. Nor do you use cheap oil that burns in a heartbeat.
You mean to tell me that with all of these frick'n Mexicans all over the MAFK'n place...you cannot find any that know how to cook authentic?
This is an OUTRAGE!
El Cacique

Bronx, NY

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Mar 4, 2014
 

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machuelo arriba wrote:
Back to food......
Anbody ever tastes Arroz con gandules with the banana leaf on top?....Slamming.
This video catches it....That's why i chose it.
http://www.youtube.com/watch...
It has to have chorizo or cerdo for flavor ,in addition, to fresh sofrito.
A secret....Chop up some more fresh cilantrilllo at the very end to give it that campesino flavor......But, Only after it's done. Let the steam cook it. It will add an additional delicious aroma to it.
I have many criollo cooking secrets.....But, i won't share them all....LOL!. Hey....I learned at the feet of the old timers. Just watching and observing.
I don't cook everyday. It's impossible. Nor do i have the time nor is it my duty to do so...I will cook only on special occasions. And many times on Sundays... But, everyone in my family and those who personally know me in my actual day to day life look forward to it when i do cook.
I personally prefer finely chopping up my own sofrito per dish. Using a little more of this or a little less of that depending on the dish...So, they don't all taste the same... I am not a big fan of frozen sofrito. It tends to be too watery and it ferments....Yes, we all know you can freeze it. Yet....I'm still not a big fan of it.

Fermented sofrito is excellent to add to soups or to add as a dry rub seasoning for meats...Just my opinion.

If you insist on doing Sofrito in a batch due to time constraints that most of us have to deal with in our fast-paced society, nowadays... Well, do it in a food processor instead of a blender. It will be finely chopped. But, not as watery if done right.

Now....The ajie question?.....They are not always available. Plain and simple... Even up here in the ethnic supermarkets its hard to find them....They are a seasonal vegetable...Jamaican scotchbonnets are in the Ajie family. But, they are NOT the sweet ajies that we normally use in PR cuisine. Especially beans... So, if you do happen to come upon a batch fine ..Buy them and freeze them or quickly make a batch of sofrito using them in the food processor.

Italian red anf long green peppers are excellent in a sofrito, as well. Along with the requisite usuals....Add fresh oregano. Dominican oregano is super strong and it gives it a mean azz kick.LOL!....But, i would suggest that you add that later on. That's what i do with my sauces. I am not crazy about orggano in my sofrito.

Per...A cada cual con su gusto personal.
El Cacique

Bronx, NY

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Mar 4, 2014
 

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Many times Jamaican scotchbonnets are mistaken for Ajies. They're not.

To the undiscriminating eye. They will look the same. Although, they shouldn't look the same because scotchbonnets are noticeably bigger.
Allan

United States

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Mar 4, 2014
 

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GodSmacked wrote:
<quoted text>
I have noticed in Caguabo very few speak English. I hope this post finds you doing well.
There are many that do and few that will let you know, once they get to know you they will open up, it may take years

Since: Sep 10

Yunited States, North America

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#13
Mar 4, 2014
 

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Allan wrote:
<quoted text>
There are many that do and few that will let you know, once they get to know you they will open up, it may take years
In San Juan I didn't have an issue but the more rural the less likely I have been to find English speaking or even ones that can understand it.

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