Knee joint replacment surgery

Knee joint replacment surgery

There are 29 comments on the Examiner.com story from Aug 5, 2014, titled Knee joint replacment surgery. In it, Examiner.com reports that:

Knee joint replacement surgery is a term you hear a lot about in the news. This surgery is an option available, and many seniors, the baby boomer generation, living today are opting for this choice.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Examiner.com.

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Nogods

Buffalo, NY

#1 Aug 6, 2014
Good advice in this news report, but many will ignore it.

Places like bonesmart.org advise people to find another doctor when their doctor tells them to lose weight before the doctor will perform a knee or hip replacement. Instead bonesmart.org should tell them to follow their doctor's directions and lose some weight.

"One of the lifestyle choices recommended to go along with the more conservative approach, is to lose weight. Losing weight allows for greater ease of motion for those with chronic arthritis of the knees. It is estimated that about one half of all knee replacements could be avoided if losing weight were an effective measure employed.

Obesity is the main risk factor for osteoarthritis. Losing as little as five percent may be beneficial in terms of diminishment of pain and increase in mobility."

Since: Dec 13

Oakland, CA

#2 Aug 6, 2014
The sad part of it is that many knee replacement surgeries could be avoided completely if some patients would lose weight. The article says that 50% of TKR's could be avoided. That is a huge amount! Just that alone would reduce much of the burden on the medical system.

Since: Jan 14

Location hidden

#3 Aug 9, 2014
Nogods wrote:
Good advice in this news report, but many will ignore it.
Places like bonesmart.org advise people to find another doctor when their doctor tells them to lose weight before the doctor will perform a knee or hip replacement. Instead bonesmart.org should tell them to follow their doctor's directions and lose some weight.
"One of the lifestyle choices recommended to go along with the more conservative approach, is to lose weight. Losing weight allows for greater ease of motion for those with chronic arthritis of the knees. It is estimated that about one half of all knee replacements could be avoided if losing weight were an effective measure employed.
Obesity is the main risk factor for osteoarthritis. Losing as little as five percent may be beneficial in terms of diminishment of pain and increase in mobility."
Really good article. I have osteoarthritis and bone spurs in my left knee. I used to run Marathons and am now lucky if I can walk a mile. My knee constantly pops out but I will put getting a knee replacement off as long as possible. Glad I stopped by this Forum.
a mom

Wolfeboro, NH

#4 Aug 10, 2014
Crystal_Clear722 wrote:
<quoted text>
Really good article. I have osteoarthritis and bone spurs in my left knee. I used to run Marathons and am now lucky if I can walk a mile. My knee constantly pops out but I will put getting a knee replacement off as long as possible. Glad I stopped by this Forum.
Who cares?

Since: Jan 14

Location hidden

#5 Aug 10, 2014
a mom wrote:
<quoted text>
Who cares?
You did - you read it.

;-)
a mom

Wolfeboro, NH

#6 Aug 10, 2014
Crystal_Clear722 wrote:
<quoted text>
You did - you read it.
;-)
If you think I read that then you have an over inflated opinion of your fat, stupid a$$.

Since: Jan 14

Location hidden

#7 Aug 11, 2014
a mom wrote:
<quoted text>
If you think I read that then you have an over inflated opinion of your fat, stupid a$$.
You cared enough to comment.

:-p

Since: Jan 14

Location hidden

#8 Aug 11, 2014
a mom wrote:
<quoted text>
If you think I read that then you have an over inflated opinion of your fat, stupid a$$.
If you didn't care you wouldn't comment or Troll. You want a reaction from people. You can say all the mean things you want and I truly don't give a dam.

Carry on.

;-)

Since: Jan 14

Location hidden

#9 Aug 11, 2014
Let's put it this way - you are very predictable.
Nogods

Buffalo, NY

#10 Aug 11, 2014
The Arthritis Foudation has an article online entitled

'How Fat Affects Arthritis"

This is an excerpt:

Why Obesity Matters

OA has a logical link to obesity: The more weight that’s on a joint, the more stressed the joint becomes, and the more likely it will wear down and be damaged.

“Weight plays an important role in joint stress, so when people are very overweight, it puts stress on their joints, especially their weight-bearing joints, like the knees and the hips,” says Eric Matteson, MD, chair of the rheumatology division at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.

Every pound of excess weight exerts about 4 pounds of extra pressure on the knees. So a person who is 10 pounds overweight has 40 pounds of extra pressure on his knees; if a person is 100 pounds overweight, that is 400 pounds of extra pressure on his knees.“So if you think about all the steps you take in a day, you can see why it would lead to premature damage in weight-bearing joints,” says Dr. Matteson.

That’s why people who are overweight are at greater risk of developing arthritis in the first place. And once a person has arthritis,“the additional weight causes even more problems on already damaged joints,” says Dr. Matteson.

But it’s not just the extra weight on joints that’s causing damage. The fat itself is active tissue that creates and releases chemicals, many of which promote inflammation.
Tank

United States

#11 Aug 11, 2014
An article in the Courier-Journal by Dennis Thompson stated:

Older people with a weight problem can relieve knee pain from osteoarthritis if they lose just 10 percent of their body weight through diet and exercise, a new study finds.

Overweight and obese people 55 or older who participated in a diet and exercise program reported less pain, better knee function, improved mobility and enhanced quality of life when they dropped one-tenth of their weight, according to the study in the Sept. 25 Journal of the American Medical Association.

"We've had a 162 percent increase in knee replacements over the last 20 years in people 65 and over, at a cost of $5 billion a year," said lead author Stephen Messier. "From our standpoint, we think this would be at least a good way to delay knee replacements and possibly prevent some knee replacements."
Nogods

Buffalo, NY

#12 Aug 11, 2014
Tank wrote:
An article in the Courier-Journal by Dennis Thompson stated:
Older people with a weight problem can relieve knee pain from osteoarthritis if they lose just 10 percent of their body weight through diet and exercise, a new study finds.
Overweight and obese people 55 or older who participated in a diet and exercise program reported less pain, better knee function, improved mobility and enhanced quality of life when they dropped one-tenth of their weight, according to the study in the Sept. 25 Journal of the American Medical Association.
"We've had a 162 percent increase in knee replacements over the last 20 years in people 65 and over, at a cost of $5 billion a year," said lead author Stephen Messier. "From our standpoint, we think this would be at least a good way to delay knee replacements and possibly prevent some knee replacements."
Don't the doctors in the American Medical Association know that if they advise their patients to lose weight before joint surgery, Josephine at bonesmart will just tell those patients to find another doctor?
Solar Cycles

Blackburn, UK

#13 Aug 13, 2014
I find this obsession with weight to be a total American philosophy, probably down to the fact that there are far more Americans with obesity problems than there are in the UK per head of the population.

What I find alarming though is the attitude that being overweight is the causation of said knee problems and not the other way, there are many of us who were as fit as a fiddle until blighted with crippling arthritic pain and then saw their waistline increase instead of vice versa. I myself spent over 25 years with awful knee problems due to a botched Patellectomy but I persevered for the biggest part of that and doing things that most fully abled bodies would wince at, but alas the pain and locking up of the knee became too much and along with several other upper body problems surrounding the neck and shoulders I found myself sidelined and depressed.

I still even now try to push boundaries even though my TKR has failed due to suspected surgical error, but I now have to live by my limitations which for someone like me is thoroughly depressing.

Since: Dec 13

Oakland, CA

#14 Aug 13, 2014
Solar Cycles wrote:
I find this obsession with weight to be a total American philosophy, probably down to the fact that there are far more Americans with obesity problems than there are in the UK per head of the population.
What I find alarming though is the attitude that being overweight is the causation of said knee problems and not the other way, there are many of us who were as fit as a fiddle until blighted with crippling arthritic pain and then saw their waistline increase instead of vice versa. I myself spent over 25 years with awful knee problems due to a botched Patellectomy but I persevered for the biggest part of that and doing things that most fully abled bodies would wince at, but alas the pain and locking up of the knee became too much and along with several other upper body problems surrounding the neck and shoulders I found myself sidelined and depressed.
I still even now try to push boundaries even though my TKR has failed due to suspected surgical error, but I now have to live by my limitations which for someone like me is thoroughly depressing.
It's far from an "obsession". It's actually a national health epidemic, as the rise in obesity rates is linked to an increase in diabetes and, yes, joint disease. There is even an alarming trend of child obesity. IMO, the underlying problem is due to processed foods, and their lower cost compared to healthy foods. There is a predominance of low fructose corn syrup in processed foods.
Solar Cycles

Blackburn, UK

#15 Aug 13, 2014
RogerWM wrote:
<quoted text>
It's far from an "obsession". It's actually a national health epidemic, as the rise in obesity rates is linked to an increase in diabetes and, yes, joint disease. There is even an alarming trend of child obesity. IMO, the underlying problem is due to processed foods, and their lower cost compared to healthy foods. There is a predominance of low fructose corn syrup in processed foods.
In America it's a far greater problem than here due to it's obsession with fast food and tv dinners, but again this is generalising and no doubt there are many more Americans who find themselves incapacitated through wear and tear of joints from years of keeping fit and strenuous labour than those who haven't and spent their lives sitting around.

Since: Dec 13

Oakland, CA

#16 Aug 13, 2014
Solar Cycles wrote:
<quoted text>no doubt there are many more Americans who find themselves incapacitated through wear and tear of joints from years of keeping fit and strenuous labour than those who haven't and spent their lives sitting around.
From years of keeping fit? LOL... that made my day.
70% of Americans are overweight. Every additional pound of body weight puts 4 additional pounds of pressure on the joints. People that normally wouldn't be experiencing joint failure until old age are experiencing it earlier in life.
Of course, forums like Bonesmart, where you like to hang out, would have you think otherwise.

Since: Jan 14

Location hidden

#17 Aug 13, 2014
RogerWM wrote:
<quoted text>From years of keeping fit? LOL... that made my day.
70% of Americans are overweight. Every additional pound of body weight puts 4 additional pounds of pressure on the joints. People that normally wouldn't be experiencing joint failure until old age are experiencing it earlier in life.
Of course, forums like Bonesmart, where you like to hang out, would have you think otherwise.
There are some of us that fall into that group. I live in Boulder, CO. Why do you think elite athletes train here? High Altitude Advantage. My left knee is shot. Both genetics and too much running. Have you ever run 80 miles a week on dirt roads? Probably not - you only can speak from your own personal experience and from those around you.

Don't assume everyone is like you.

Since: Dec 13

Oakland, CA

#18 Aug 13, 2014
Crystal_Clear722 wrote:
<quoted text>
There are some of us that fall into that group. I live in Boulder, CO. Why do you think elite athletes train here? High Altitude Advantage. My left knee is shot. Both genetics and too much running. Have you ever run 80 miles a week on dirt roads? Probably not - you only can speak from your own personal experience and from those around you.
Don't assume everyone is like you.
I'm not assuming that. In fact, I developed my osteoarthritis and had a TKR because of an old sports injury. I was an athlete. Nothing to do with weight. So, don't assume you know anything about my situation....
And, I didn't say there were NO people that fell into that category. Where did I say that? We are not using Bonesmart logic here.

Since: Dec 13

Oakland, CA

#19 Aug 13, 2014
Crystal_Clear722 wrote:
<quoted text>
There are some of us that fall into that group. I live in Boulder, CO. Why do you think elite athletes train here? High Altitude Advantage. My left knee is shot. Both genetics and too much running. Have you ever run 80 miles a week on dirt roads? Probably not - you only can speak from your own personal experience and from those around you.
Don't assume everyone is like you.
Oh, BTW, I agree that it was a good article. I also agree that you should put off your TKR as long as you cam. But don't put it off too long. I put mine off for over 10 years, during which time I was on anti-inflammatories and injections of synthetic lubricants. This worked for a while, but it finally got to a point where my knee no longer responded to the treatments, and became a deformed mess. I suffered like that for a few more years. Things are much better now. I can walk and do exercise and activities pain free. But, I wouldn't run, because it introduces too much premature wear on the plastic spacer in the knee. Also, be aware that not all recoveries are 100% trouble free. Although my surgery was successful, meaning that there was no infection and a revision was not necessary, the final outcome is less than perfect. The surgeon used a slightly too small plastic spacer in my knee. The size of the spacer is largely a judgement call on the Dr's part. Drs are human, and make mistakes. This resulted in laxity and synovitis in the joint. I now need to wear a fabric knee support sleeve, but I believe that is better than doing a revision of the TKR, at least for now. I wish you the best of luck when you get the TKR.

Since: Jan 14

Location hidden

#20 Aug 13, 2014
RogerWM wrote:
<quoted text>
Oh, BTW, I agree that it was a good article. I also agree that you should put off your TKR as long as you cam. But don't put it off too long. I put mine off for over 10 years, during which time I was on anti-inflammatories and injections of synthetic lubricants. This worked for a while, but it finally got to a point where my knee no longer responded to the treatments, and became a deformed mess. I suffered like that for a few more years. Things are much better now. I can walk and do exercise and activities pain free. But, I wouldn't run, because it introduces too much premature wear on the plastic spacer in the knee. Also, be aware that not all recoveries are 100% trouble free. Although my surgery was successful, meaning that there was no infection and a revision was not necessary, the final outcome is less than perfect. The surgeon used a slightly too small plastic spacer in my knee. The size of the spacer is largely a judgement call on the Dr's part. Drs are human, and make mistakes. This resulted in laxity and synovitis in the joint. I now need to wear a fabric knee support sleeve, but I believe that is better than doing a revision of the TKR, at least for now. I wish you the best of luck when you get the TKR.
I typed that from my iPhone so it's difficult to tell who is who. Sorry if I seemed to come on a bit strong. I'm not in tip top shape, but I'm not overweight either. I'm at the tail end of getting injections - I've had 4 of 5. The biggest problem I seem to be having is having my knee pop out. It's a pretty intense pain that kind of takes your breath away for a moment and you just have to stop. It's bit disconcerting.

Thank You - I'm going to hold off on the TKR for the moment. It would be nice to walk a mile without the pain. The goods news is the Elliptical Machine gives a pretty good workout. So I'm doing that more and more and try to get at least a mile in around the track.

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