Micro farms are the future in Vermont

Micro farms are the future in Vermont

There are 11 comments on the Bennington Banner story from Nov 24, 2010, titled Micro farms are the future in Vermont. In it, Bennington Banner reports that:

The commercial dairy industry is rapidly consolidating and commercial dairy farms are becoming ever and ever larger.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Bennington Banner.

woodsplitter

Saratoga Springs, NY

#1 Nov 25, 2010
I have animals right now and that includes cows.Your idea sounds good but wil not work.I will tell you why.I buy cornmeal at a discount price and get it under the price of the bigger farmers because I only get it once a month or month and a half.I am just their pocket money.there is no way that the little farms can even grow their own feed and get it as cheap as the huge farms,I was able to buy feed 3 hours away at half the price of what it could be bought in ashington,Rensellear,Saratoga or Warren counties in New York.I did check vermont.Even buying by the ton with a 3 ton limit is was still cheaper.Not many farms can start a trucking company just to get their food cheap enough for them to get a good price on food.If that isn't bad enough your milkhouse and everything to do with it will have to be inspected by the state and you better have what you need to have with them.It's sad but quite simple the people with the little amount of cows will not be able to afford the feed for their animals that the big places can.Unless they are rich and get their money some other way than producing milk.
Simha Bode

Zurich, Switzerland

#2 Nov 26, 2010
Yes, woodsplitter... HYPE, Wish it were true, we all know the Real trend... Now if S 510 food safety act gets passed 'micro farms' will really go belly up, having to pay to jump through all the new regulatory hoops.

check my blog, pass the word http://vermont4evolution.wordpress.com - VT Sustainability resource, initiatives, events, news and more.

Peace, Simha

Since: Nov 10

Brattleboro, VT

#3 Nov 26, 2010
This is an advertisement for the company whose link appears at the bottom of the article. It claims to provide technology that makes micro-dairies profitable. It would take an independent review to say whether this system really lives up to the claims.
rob McWaters

Bennington, VT

#4 Nov 26, 2010
I have in the past and continue to believe mircro farming is the best way for Vermont to be a prosperous state in the lower 48. Small farms manage for familes is our route to permanent recovery and sustainability.
EJF

Burlington, VT

#5 Nov 26, 2010
rob McWaters wrote:
I have in the past and continue to believe mircro farming is the best way for Vermont to be a prosperous state in the lower 48. Small farms manage for familes is our route to permanent recovery and sustainability.
Stick to your drum circles, Rob. Micro farming is as sustainable as living in a yurt in Glastenbury.

Since: Nov 10

Brattleboro, VT

#8 Nov 29, 2010
rob McWaters wrote:
I have in the past and continue to believe mircro farming is the best way for Vermont to be a prosperous state in the lower 48. Small farms manage for familes is our route to permanent recovery and sustainability.
This issue is not determined by feelings or beliefs. The numbers have to add up. If you can't produce food on a small scale profitably, then all you have is a hobby, not a production system. I'd like to see the P&L statements for some of these small operations. I'd be ready to invest in small farming, but only if it's a viable business.
kem

Bennington, VT

#9 Nov 30, 2010
I would love to see one of you WANT to be a small farmer.
I am friends with many independent farmers, and I would love to see one of you who drinks milk, eats cheese and complains about the cost, get up at 3:30 in the morning until after dark, mucking cleaning, milking, feeding, until after supper time, be able to stomach food, go to bed at 8-9 and have to do it all over again 364 more days in a row.
No worries about flight delays, traffic jams, or, hmmmm, money...You have none!
Clean it up

Little Rock, AR

#10 Dec 2, 2010
kem wrote:
I would love to see one of you WANT to be a small farmer.
I am friends with many independent farmers, and I would love to see one of you who drinks milk, eats cheese and complains about the cost, get up at 3:30 in the morning until after dark, mucking cleaning, milking, feeding, until after supper time, be able to stomach food, go to bed at 8-9 and have to do it all over again 364 more days in a row.
No worries about flight delays, traffic jams, or, hmmmm, money...You have none!
And they can do it all with $30,000 windmills and $50,000 worth of solar panels. That should help their profit margin quite a bit!
Anywhere

White Plains, NY

#11 Dec 2, 2010
kem wrote:
I would love to see one of you WANT to be a small farmer.
I am friends with many independent farmers, and I would love to see one of you who drinks milk, eats cheese and complains about the cost, get up at 3:30 in the morning until after dark, mucking cleaning, milking, feeding, until after supper time, be able to stomach food, go to bed at 8-9 and have to do it all over again 364 more days in a row.
No worries about flight delays, traffic jams, or, hmmmm, money...You have none!
If they get up at 3:30 to milk and work until after dark - then I don't believe they are a small operation. I grew up on a farm with 100 milk cows and while everyone worked hard - it was not as intense as you make it out to be. A smaller farm would be less work. A bigger farm would hire help. I'm not sure what he means by micro farming. We raise pigs for meat and a garden. Does that make our family micro farmers? If it does - then we couldn't make it without other jobs.

Since: Jan 08

Brewster, MA

#12 Dec 2, 2010
Face the Fax wrote:
This is an advertisement for the company whose link appears at the bottom of the article. It claims to provide technology that makes micro-dairies profitable. It would take an independent review to say whether this system really lives up to the claims.
Check the Times Union article on this trend in upstate NY.
Joe

Burlington, VT

#13 Dec 2, 2010
Face the Fax wrote:
<quoted text>
This issue is not determined by feelings or beliefs. The numbers have to add up. If you can't produce food on a small scale profitably, then all you have is a hobby, not a production system. I'd like to see the P&L statements for some of these small operations. I'd be ready to invest in small farming, but only if it's a viable business.
http://www.ers.usda.gov/StateFacts/VT.htm

very few have the gross revenue to account for the investment in land and equipment and supplies to make it a viable opperation.

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