After Cemex's departure, North Coast ...

After Cemex's departure, North Coast residents try something ne...

There are 58 comments on the Santa Cruz Sentinel story from Apr 11, 2010, titled After Cemex's departure, North Coast residents try something ne.... In it, Santa Cruz Sentinel reports that:

For decades, developers have dreamed of building resorts, plotting out tract housing and breaking ground on a host of other projects along the still-wild coast between Santa Cruz and Half Moon Bay.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Santa Cruz Sentinel.

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nofear

Santa Cruz, CA

#1 Apr 11, 2010
Great ideas! I hope this "project" works. I spend many hours cycling on the Slow Coast so having more places to stop for a rest and a bite to eat would be very cool. One suggestion though...you might want to make sure it is ok to use the term "Slow" in your organization. The City of San Luis Obispo uses the term "SLO" in a lot of their advertising, etc.(The SLO Life, SLO Town) I wouldn't want you to get into using "Slow Coast" and then have them come down on you for using "their" trade name. It might save you some legal threats. Just sayin'...
Liz

Scotts Valley, CA

#2 Apr 11, 2010
Wonderful how community members are pulling together. Great marketing potential here.
Davida

San Francisco, CA

#3 Apr 11, 2010
Love that the residents are committed to preserving the area. Not having strip malls, big hotels or other such resort-living amenities is actually quite a draw for many visitors who want to spend a peaceful day in an open area. Nothing is more eco-friendly than leaving the coastal lands free from buildings.
WJN

Phoenix, AZ

#4 Apr 11, 2010
@nofear: good point re SLO

They also use it for SLO Food, which doesn't seem to conflict with Slow Food.

We love our SLO coast friends up here on the SLOW Coast.

(it's amazing what a difference a little "w" can make, no? ; )
Ex Liberal

United States

#5 Apr 11, 2010
Come on Capitalist developers. Time to get in line for a great big slice of developmental pie! Liberal Land is has finally seen the light and is ready to toss their anti-growth, Socialist-communalism, radical environmentalism anti-growth ways and join the real world of increased tax base sustained by commercial developement and housing, housing and more housing! Build baby build! Show me da money!!!!!!!
Imelda

Santa Cruz, CA

#6 Apr 11, 2010
WJN wrote:
@nofear: good point re SLO
They also use it for SLO Food, which doesn't seem to conflict with Slow Food.
We love our SLO coast friends up here on the SLOW Coast.
(it's amazing what a difference a little "w" can make, no? ; )
as long as it's not George W....
Matt Kay

Oakland, CA

#7 Apr 11, 2010
The cement plant closure will doom all small business in the area with the exception of those that receive buses filled with Euro holiday makers and the Blue Collar homeowners are going to choke on the new water bills. I stopped going to the cash store and W.C. Bakery years ago because the service was poor and the prices increased, respectively. The W.C. does offer a good place to pinch a loaf though on the morning surf commute. The only things that will create revenue but will never be built are the following: 1) Well designed destination golf course or two (think Bandon Dunes, Ore.), 2) High end luxury accommodations (think Ritz Carlton, HMB), 3) Deluxe campgrounds/trailer parks. I am not the most intelligent guy in Santa Cruz but i'd think that the aforementioned attractions would probably beat out the current dump of a town and services.

But hey, this is California, you can grandfather in and operate a 100 year old super-polluting cement plant 100 yards from the Pacific, spray pesticide and fertilizer all over the bluffs both north and south and dissect both with a California Highway but getting approval to lay some sod over the old quarry or putting in RV hook-ups will start WW III. But hey, like I said, I am not the sharpest tool in the shed.
true roots

Santa Cruz, CA

#9 Apr 11, 2010
sounds like the big sur neighborhood that goes for many many miles of land, everyone knows one another & they make it happen.. from education, to business, barter/ trade,farming, lodging & camping to beautiful escapes, good foods,music,arts,and the list goes on..there has always been a community in the north coast, and some whale city bakery for breakfast sounds good right about now !!
Beyond the cardboard box

United States

#10 Apr 11, 2010
*** Matt Kay says "The only things that will create revenue but will never be built are the following: 1) Well designed destination golf course or two (think Bandon Dunes, Ore.), 2) High end luxury accommodations (think Ritz Carlton, HMB), 3) Deluxe campgrounds/trailer parks. I am not the most intelligent guy in Santa Cruz but i'd think that the aforementioned attractions would probably beat out the current dump of a town and services." ***
I wholeheartedly agree with Matt. Maybe the current residents along hwy 1 can eek out a living and remain impoverished government cared for people. But to waste the potential of the area for the few, instead of the many, is a shame. Golf courses are so scarce in this area. I've so often wondered why?? It seems like SC doesn't want anything clean and classy that makes money and brings a better element .. How about a "family golf course"? One with a short course for beginners and a golf school that teaches the game and the protocol? You could also include trail hiking and nature studies. Teach city people about the ocean and the trees. A different kind of destination resort without the plastic Disney or amusement park atmosphere. Now to find a corporate entity with the bucks to buy and build .. Think BIG people!
moehopp

Santa Cruz, CA

#11 Apr 11, 2010
true roots wrote:
sounds like the big sur neighborhood that goes for many many miles of land, everyone knows one another & they make it happen.. from education, to business, barter/ trade,farming, lodging & camping to beautiful escapes, good foods,music,arts,and the list goes on..there has always been a community in the north coast, and some whale city bakery for breakfast sounds good right about now !!
Ummmm, can I point out some differences in comparing this to a "big sur neighborhood"? No Carmel with super-wealthy residences to support business in off season near-by. No world-class Golf facilities to bring in dollars to the area. No resorts/campgrounds/hotels to keep visitors for more than just a day or two. But, good luck with the dreamim'.
Sounds like some "feel good hippie commune vibe" that just never works. Let me know when you can't afford to live their anymore, I'll be glad to buy you out and make my commute from Davenport.
Douglas Deitch

Felton, CA

#12 Apr 11, 2010
One of the biggest problems that North County has is that the City of Santa Cruz takes most of the water from the major creeks up there for their water supply, transported south through an old, though only slightly leaky pipe, that is being replaced by the city at a cost of tens of millions of dollars.

Actually, around the same amount of water is being transported south and "exported" to the city as would be/is required by the 700 acres or so of ag land still remaining on Coast Dairies Ranch.

Too bad the city, Gary Patton, Andy Schiffrin, Neal Coonerty, the other supervisors, etc. never did the due diligence required to thoroughly understand my regional water plan (without a SC desal plant, with Loch Lomond always full, no pipeline, etc.)...

which would leave all the creek waters up on the Slow Coast for the ag lands required water there, where it belongs, and save tens of millions by not replacing the water line up there, as presently planned...

I call this good planning and good "supervision"!

I think the Slow Coasters would really appreciate their waters being left in their community for their local needs there...
That's what I plan on attempting to do...
Hunter

Milpitas, CA

#13 Apr 11, 2010
Ex Liberal wrote:
anti-growth, Socialist-communalism, radical environmentalism anti-growth....Build baby build! Show me da money!!!!!!!
You're weird. I mean really weird.
Seacliff Local

Felton, CA

#14 Apr 11, 2010
I love when people choose to be resourceful and creative, working together to solve their problems rather than sitting on the pity-pot and complaining about the lousy hand they were dealt!

Congrat's to the Slow Coasters and their plans for their future!
wildman

Saratoga, CA

#15 Apr 11, 2010
A certain amount of infrastructure is needed to support tourism, and at this time it is not there. There is not enough overnight housing and food establishments to provide for the needs of tourists. Also not enough land zoned to meet those needs. A rezoning of the Cemex site would be a start, but no book stores to compete with the Coons.
wah wah

United States

#16 Apr 11, 2010
Seacliff Local wrote:
I love when people choose to be resourceful and creative, working together to solve their problems rather than sitting on the pity-pot and complaining about the lousy hand they were dealt!
Congrat's to the Slow Coasters and their plans for their future!
Where have you been?? These people have been crying the blues. Their sugar daddy left and they are sucking their thumbs. This is the best they can come up with? Pitiful!
What a waste of mother nature. Who wants to drive up the coast and see a bunch of shacks and losers? Nice drive and that's about all .. no reason to stop until you get to HMB.
Pipe Dreams Please No

San Bruno, CA

#17 Apr 11, 2010
"For the month of July, the group is encouraging residents to shop for most of their daily needs with fellow Slow Coasters, especially food. With cheese, wheat, eggs, coffee, wine, beer and other edibles readily available, Nichols said the effort shouldn't be hard."

Oh, yeah?And just where is all that nice food available? At that disgusting and overpriced market in Davenport? I live in the area. This turtle-chasing guy (pretty privileged job, btw) is full of bs.

And how many ex-cement-plant employees really live on this strip of coast? The ones I know of drove in from elsewhere. More bs.

This article makes it sound as if the cement plant was the only local employer, in recent history. No mention of the closed mushroom farm (onetime mushroom soup plant)? Or was that "just" employing Hispanic farm workers, so it doesn't count?

Where is the Coastanoa development in all of this planning? Funny how that not-so-little boondoggle slipped into our "protected" coast. Where is Pescadero?

While I do hope that Davenport can come up with some revenue producer to fill the void, I don't think this is it. Including La Honda in the plan? That town has nothing to do with the coast, and has more to do with loud and noxious things we don't want to see more of here. Like motorcyclists. And drug sales.

I cringe at the mention of promoting local "crafts", but that's me. I envision ditsy gift shops full of lavender sachets, handmade soaps, jams, greeting cards, driftwood art, etc. Does the limited vision of these "planners" (who seem to be heavily weighted toward Davenport and Bonnie Doon, and to white guys who would never have lowered themselves to work at a blue-collar plant) extend solely to reeling in "Foodie" weekenders with large wallets? Doesn't anyone see the idiocy of tying the local economy completely to the whims of discretionary spending by affluent Silicon Valley sybarites and San Francisco daytrippers? What is the first thing to go from a budget when the economy tanks? Overpriced, "artisanal" foods. Splurge wines. Crafty gewgaws. During bad times, people still travel the coast, visit the beaches, bike the roads. But they don't buy anything other than the necessary supplies: food, beverages, gasoline. What Davenport needs is a real market, a gas station, a better restaurant. It could do with a very small hotel. Before tying itself to the fortunes of a nebulous "community" along the North coast, Davenport needs to concentrate on its own problems. It needs to work on becoming a town, rather than an appendage to the plant.
Yousaidit

United States

#18 Apr 11, 2010
" But hey, like I said, I am not the sharpest tool in the shed."
I completely agree.
just saying

Alamo, CA

#19 Apr 11, 2010
What ever the plan, something would need to be done to deal with the 70 mph traffic that flies through Hwy 1. It's like having a nice little village on a freeway. That area has had a lot of accidents. It looks quiet and innocent enough and then suddenly a car will zoom through. Locals know to beware, but tourists don't.
Also, there needs to be something interesting to do on really foggy days and there are a lot of them.
Just my thoughts. Good luck Davenport.
renesands

San Diego, CA

#20 Apr 11, 2010
Ex Liberal wrote:
Come on Capitalist developers. Time to get in line for a great big slice of developmental pie! Liberal Land is has finally seen the light and is ready to toss their anti-growth, Socialist-communalism, radical environmentalism anti-growth ways and join the real world of increased tax base sustained by commercial developement and housing, housing and more housing! Build baby build! Show me da money!!!!!!!
Spoken like one who has never been lucky enough to enjoy the sublime, world-class beauty of this area.[assuming the Exlib quote was not entirely sardonic]
Don't forget the battle cry: Dollars over Everything!
Driftwad

South San Francisco, CA

#21 Apr 11, 2010
Since Cemex closed its Davenport cement plant in January, many North Coast residents have suffered an economic and psychological blow. Along with lost jobs, Davenport in July expects its water and sewer bills to soar to nearly $4,000 annually. Sewer bills would jump 74 percent and water bills 10 percent as Cemex no longer foots much of the utility bill for the former company town.

I think the water/sewer department should eat the difference.

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