Where to find the high quality frozen yogurt mix??

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Since: Feb 11

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#1201
Sep 14, 2011
 
MasterH wrote:
I am sure the floor is not finished. there should be gravels and the wall should be unpainted?
You can get like $50k for brand new building but you are going to use most of it for plumbing, pouring concrete, painting walls, grid ceiling or running hvac, building restrooms.
here is the advantage though. you can ask for what professional contractors charge and hire cheaper contractor to keep the difference.
I got $15k for old space. there was no plumbing so it was a lot of work for me to jack hammer the concrete floor and run the pipes.
If you get the space in the strip mall, managed by a big company, you should ask for T.I
but if you are just renting it from some individual guy, he might laugh at you when you ask him to pay part of your build out.
Shoot for $10+ per sf for old space,$25+ for new space depending on what's already finished
<quoted text>
Also keep in mind the CAM. They will tack on that additional charge in addition to sq footage price. Often it is about $2-3 extra. Bigger locations will go higher.
Our new shop we opted not to put down tile like at our first one. This one is 4200 sq ft so that would have been a very big expense. It has concrete floors, so we stained & painted. MUCH cheaper
MasterH

Salt Lake City, UT

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#1202
Sep 15, 2011
 
So I went to this gelato place today. I bought this tiny gelato for $4.
If I put that on my scale (I charge 35 cents per oz), it would be $2~2.5
They also serve kids size for 6 and under (very very tiny cup) and it was $2.5.
at my place, people pay $1.2~1.5 for their kids (popsicle at 7 11 should cost the same)
I don't know if they make it by themselves but my supplier carries gelato and it costs the same as yogurt. So their profit margin should be at least twice higher than mine.

Before opening the store, I thought self-serve model is win-win for both business owner and customers. I save money on labors (you will realize you are not really saving since you have to maintain many machines and invest $$$ for those machines) and customers get more yogurt at the same price they pay at non-self serve.

Non-self serve place charge $2.99 for their small size. To make the same profit, people should spend at least $5.
Obviously many people prefer to get the same amount and they end up paying like $2 or less.
So is self-serve good profit model?
If you are selling something at a lot cheaper price, you can only compensate that by selling it a lot.
If I see t shirts for 50% off, I will grab several of those.
Do people eat more or eat often just because it's cheaper?????

I honestly was upset because people are not willing to pay the same for the yogurt which is pretty much the same quality.(plus I offer fresh fruits. Raspberries, blackberries, blueberries will get more expensive soon. it will cost more than what I charge but I will still carry it)

I think self-serve yogurt shop is the only place you can take your date out with $5 on your hand and still can get plenty.
only other places I can think of is getting a sundae at costco or mcdonald.
(obviously you can't do that since it's embarassing lol)

bottom line, to make the same profit, you have to get twice or three times more customers than baskin robbins, maggie moos, cold stone etc.
(Ross Vs boutique clothing shop)

Was it easy for you?
I'd like to hear opinions from current business owners.
Karu

Moratuwa, Sri Lanka

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#1203
Sep 15, 2011
 
Can someone who is using the Donper frozen Yogurt machine from China please comment. I am a start up and thinking to go with this machine.
Billy

Ocala, FL

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#1204
Sep 19, 2011
 
MasterH - if you are looking to get out of the game, I'm interested in buying your yogurt machines :)
JanJan * yogurtgirl/boy/guy and anyone else - I just signed my lease in central florida. How did you design your decor and how did you find the used stoelting f-231s? I've scoured the internet with no luck. I'm buying 5 new but would like to get a few used ones so I could afford to have 6. I'm also really considering going to get some used Taylor machines and getting some type of maintenance plan with them as I could easily afford a ton of them instead of the stoeltings. Thoughts?
Also, do you do smoothies and what type of special equipment did you purchase to handle them? I imagine if I wanted to also make them behind the counter I would need a smaller machine for easy access.
I'd love to ask you a few more personal questions out of here so if u are free, please email me at ufbilly@gmail.com! I would sincerely appreciate it as I'm in over my head and could use a little guidance!
P.S. who designed your logo and where do you order your cups from? Again, thanks so much
Billy

Ocala, FL

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#1205
Sep 19, 2011
 
I'm verified now so you can also private message me :)

Since: Sep 11

Ocala, FL

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#1206
Sep 19, 2011
 
I guess I need to sign in to make that easier :)
FroYo in Paradise

Charleston, SC

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#1207
Sep 20, 2011
 
MasterH wrote:
So I went to this gelato place today. I bought this tiny gelato for $4.
If I put that on my scale (I charge 35 cents per oz), it would be $2~2.5
They also serve kids size for 6 and under (very very tiny cup) and it was $2.5.
at my place, people pay $1.2~1.5 for their kids (popsicle at 7 11 should cost the same)
I don't know if they make it by themselves but my supplier carries gelato and it costs the same as yogurt. So their profit margin should be at least twice higher than mine.
Before opening the store, I thought self-serve model is win-win for both business owner and customers. I save money on labors (you will realize you are not really saving since you have to maintain many machines and invest $$$ for those machines) and customers get more yogurt at the same price they pay at non-self serve.
Non-self serve place charge $2.99 for their small size. To make the same profit, people should spend at least $5.
Obviously many people prefer to get the same amount and they end up paying like $2 or less.
So is self-serve good profit model?
If you are selling something at a lot cheaper price, you can only compensate that by selling it a lot.
If I see t shirts for 50% off, I will grab several of those.
Do people eat more or eat often just because it's cheaper?????
I honestly was upset because people are not willing to pay the same for the yogurt which is pretty much the same quality.(plus I offer fresh fruits. Raspberries, blackberries, blueberries will get more expensive soon. it will cost more than what I charge but I will still carry it)
I think self-serve yogurt shop is the only place you can take your date out with $5 on your hand and still can get plenty.
only other places I can think of is getting a sundae at costco or mcdonald.
(obviously you can't do that since it's embarassing lol)
bottom line, to make the same profit, you have to get twice or three times more customers than baskin robbins, maggie moos, cold stone etc.
(Ross Vs boutique clothing shop)
Was it easy for you?
I'd like to hear opinions from current business owners.
Opened my shop in mid August........lousy timing I know....We have 8 F-231 machines. 32 dry toppings, 12 cold toppings and 4 hot toppings. Also have a salad bar and soup bar. Seating for 50. Just opened a drive thru as well. We have had an extended soft opening and will have the Grand Opening at the end of the month. It has been a learning experience to say the least. The business grows each day.

In this town there are 2 Menchies, a Freshberry, a Yogurt Mountain, a 32 Degrees and a Yobes. I am the only non chain in town. People appreciate that. Fortunately, all the competition is either downtown or on the other side of town with the exception of Yobes which uses a powder mix to make their Yogurt. I use both YoCream and HH. Have also been making my own flavors with organic syrups such as Cotton Candy and Bubble Gum.

I want to thank JanJan in particular for his willingness to share valuable information.
FroYo in Paradise

Charleston, SC

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#1208
Sep 20, 2011
 
Oh I forgot. There is also a TCBY that just opened this summer as well. All those shops are self serve with the exception of Freshberry and it is my understanding they are switching over as well. In addition, there are some gelato places sprinkled about town in addition to ice cream places such as Marble Slab just down the street from us.

My shop was formerly a Popeye's chicken joint. I finally decided to use an epoxy with chip flecks to paint over the butt ugly red tile they used in the kitchen area and it is awesome. Cleans with a mop and impervious to anything except a jack hammer.

Since: Sep 11

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#1209
Sep 21, 2011
 
I am on the same page MasterH.

Ever since we've opened our sales have been ok. Enough for me to get by. When school started our weekly sales have dropped $1k. That means $4k less a month! Now that it's starting to get colder outside my sales have dropped down another $1k a week. I'm at the point where I ready to throw in the white flag.

Out of curiosity how much do shop owners pay for electricity? I have 1000sq ft and 6 water cooled 3 phased machine. My monthly electricity bill is $1700! Is everyone else paying around the same amount? Do these machine really use this much power?
MasterH wrote:
I don't know if you guys know the reality of Froyo Business right now.
I thought people would buy $5 dollars yogurt and I would make at least $3.5 as a markup. I did some math based on $4 average sale though before opening the store.
well you better change your plan.
First of all, I don't have a business in a poor area. the average household income is about $60k
I think my average sale per cup is about $2.5~3.
Parents usually get $1.5 yogurt for their kids (makes me upset since you can get the ice cream stick at 7 eleve for the same price)
Many people come as a couple and buy 1 yogurt. Parents share the yogurt with kids all the time. So average sale per person should be $1~2 range.
So don't do your math this way 'hm I think I can get 200 customers a day. 200 x $4 =$800, not bad' In reality, you will sell 120~150 cups ranging from $1.2~$7. I say $350~450 is the right estimate
My gross margin is 50%(before deducting rent, employee cost, utilities)
This is really bad for dessert business since you are supposed to mark it up 3~5 times.(I buy $2 coffee everyday. it's small amount of money. But what is their raw cost for it? 10 cents?, In my business I make $1 )
so why is it so low?
I buy cheap yogurt like everyone else ($25 per case for 6 cartons)
I buy fruits at costco. I buy topping from the supplier.
I do take about 200 Buy 1 Get 1 Coupons every month
So is it because a lot of people eat $1 worth of yogurt and buy $2 yogurt?
Is it because I take a lot of coupons?
I don't think there is anyway for me to figure it out. I am just upset.
you could make a good money several years ago by running pinkberry style froyo business. small size is like $3.5. You add couple toppings and it's already over $5. I mean it was like Jamba juice. you expect to spend $5 there. Would you walk into Jamba juice with $5 bill for you and your GF? how dumb is that? Well $5 is plenty for two at froyo place. both of you can try 5 flavors of each flavors which will kill your cravings and each of you can just buy $2.5 yogurt for on the way home!
Nowadays, people say 35~39 cents per oz. they can try as much as sample before they buy, they have right to buy $1 yogurt after trying all the flavors.
how much is your gross margin guys?

Since: Feb 11

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#1210
Sep 22, 2011
 
newshopowner wrote:
I am on the same page MasterH.
Ever since we've opened our sales have been ok. Enough for me to get by. When school started our weekly sales have dropped $1k. That means $4k less a month! Now that it's starting to get colder outside my sales have dropped down another $1k a week. I'm at the point where I ready to throw in the white flag.
Out of curiosity how much do shop owners pay for electricity? I have 1000sq ft and 6 water cooled 3 phased machine. My monthly electricity bill is $1700! Is everyone else paying around the same amount? Do these machine really use this much power?
<quoted text>
Sorry, just got back into town, was on vacation for a few days. But I checked my recent power bills, and in the hot days of July & August out bills were between 1100 - 1200. We have 2000 sq ft. I think your power bills are high for your sq footage you have.
Our sales actually went down when school was OUT. Some, but not a whole lot. Now that schools have began again, out sales have gone back up. Strange I know, but we have colleges and boarding schools too. So when they leave, the sales do too.
We are planning on adding seciality coffee in our shop. We sell alot of bottled water too, but with cooler weather we feel that self serve coffee would be a added plus. In looking at machines, boy the companies want as much as a frozen yogurt machine. Too expensive in my opinion.
Jan

Since: Aug 11

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#1211
Sep 25, 2011
 
Can anyone tell me how many people a 1600sqft yogurt shop can seat comfortably? I know that this isn't an exact science, since know two shops will be designed the same. Just a best guess would be great.

Thanks
MasterH

Salt Lake City, UT

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#1212
Sep 28, 2011
 
newshopowner wrote:
I am on the same page MasterH.
Ever since we've opened our sales have been ok. Enough for me to get by. When school started our weekly sales have dropped $1k. That means $4k less a month! Now that it's starting to get colder outside my sales have dropped down another $1k a week. I'm at the point where I ready to throw in the white flag.
Out of curiosity how much do shop owners pay for electricity? I have 1000sq ft and 6 water cooled 3 phased machine. My monthly electricity bill is $1700! Is everyone else paying around the same amount? Do these machine really use this much power?
<quoted text>
OMG $1700???????
I have 3 three phase and 2 single phase, 1 fridge, 1 freezer, 1 water heater.
I use track lights (about 30 bulbs) my space is 1500sf. the highest bill was $500
I can't imagine paying $1700 for electricity and selling yogurt at that cheap price.

Btw, why do you think your sales number is going down?
obviously you can't negotiate with the weather. do you have new competition nearby? people are becoming cheaper?(buy $2 yogurt and come only when they have coupons?)
MasterH

Salt Lake City, UT

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#1213
Sep 28, 2011
 
yogurtman wrote:
Can anyone tell me how many people a 1600sqft yogurt shop can seat comfortably? I know that this isn't an exact science, since know two shops will be designed the same. Just a best guess would be great.
Thanks
you don't need a space that big. anyways, 30 people can sit fine in a space like that.

I decorated very nice buy 70~80% people just pick up and go. I get upset since I am wasting my space.

Get a smaller space and find a better location. that's my 2 cents

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#1214
Sep 29, 2011
 
yogurtman wrote:
Can anyone tell me how many people a 1600sqft yogurt shop can seat comfortably? I know that this isn't an exact science, since know two shops will be designed the same. Just a best guess would be great.
Thanks
MasterH May be correct on the space issue. We do have alot of get-n-go customers, but we also have alot of folks who do like to sit and relax to eat their yogurt. Students often will "hang out" at our spot taking advantage of the free WiFI too. But we are limited by how many seats we can have in our shop too. That is dictated by the number of parking spots we have available. Do you have that same limitation? If not, look carefully at your seating, your spacing and can they easily & safely walk between the tables/chairs and the machines, toppings and checkout areas.

Jan

Since: Sep 11

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#1215
Sep 29, 2011
 
MasterH wrote:
<quoted text>
OMG $1700???????
I have 3 three phase and 2 single phase, 1 fridge, 1 freezer, 1 water heater.
I use track lights (about 30 bulbs) my space is 1500sf. the highest bill was $500
I can't imagine paying $1700 for electricity and selling yogurt at that cheap price.
Btw, why do you think your sales number is going down?
obviously you can't negotiate with the weather. do you have new competition nearby? people are becoming cheaper?(buy $2 yogurt and come only when they have coupons?)
Yes $1700! I have 6 three phase water cooled machine, 1 freezer, 1 fridge, 1 sandwich prep table and water heater. I tried calling power company to come out and they said it could be my a/c. My a/c runs at all times and won't cut off cause it won't get cold enough in my shop. I cut employees hour so that I could cut my expenses, but ended up using the money to pay for power every month.
I am fed up with all of it to be honest. After paying out all the costs now I have to pay quarterly taxes for hiring employees!
There was another shop that opened up about 15 minutes away. But I have people coming in everyday saying they have terrible tasting yogurt. They use powder mix instead of liquid mix.
I really don't know why sales have dropped so dramatically. I'm trying to that out. Right now I'm trying to increase sales vs cutting more hours.
Any suggestions?
Adil

Rabat, Morocco

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#1216
Sep 30, 2011
 
mosty wrote:
hi everone. I'm opening a frozen yogurt store in the middle east (egypt)and i'm looking for a supplier for the mix can any one help me!
Pregel is thé best
MasterH

Salt Lake City, UT

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#1217
Sep 30, 2011
 
I would go throughly with your HVAC. maybe the freon is low and it keeps running long till it hits the set temperature? I was even upset with $500 bill. I don't know if they have different rate for electricity in other states though.

I wouldn't trust customers' comments 100%.
I have a big franchise competition. I heard numerous times, their yogurt was terrible. I see a lot of people there.
I have another competition that uses the same yogurt. people come and say 'wow yours tastes better' I had to laugh inside when I heard that.
People have just different tastes. You have to make your own decision.

Let's talk about powder mix. I used those Original Tart Powder and mixed it with fruity syrups.
It actually tastes like real yogurt because of tart.
Some people like real frozen yogurt flavor and some people like a yogurt that tastes like an ice cream.
I don't use those powders anymore. it was more expensive and required more work.
I noticed all people wanted was the cheap yogurt so that they can save 50 cents. so why would I spend more money on yogurt when my competition is using cheap yogurt and doing well?

There are flavors that you can't mix on your own like cake batter, cookies and cream etc. you have to use liquid mix for those.

Try to save expense by cutting hours. I work 7 days a week. I take few hours break for several days but that's it. When the winter time comes, I would basically have to work open to close, 7 days a week. I hope this will make you feel better :)
newshopowner wrote:
<quoted text>
Yes $1700! I have 6 three phase water cooled machine, 1 freezer, 1 fridge, 1 sandwich prep table and water heater. I tried calling power company to come out and they said it could be my a/c. My a/c runs at all times and won't cut off cause it won't get cold enough in my shop. I cut employees hour so that I could cut my expenses, but ended up using the money to pay for power every month.
I am fed up with all of it to be honest. After paying out all the costs now I have to pay quarterly taxes for hiring employees!
There was another shop that opened up about 15 minutes away. But I have people coming in everyday saying they have terrible tasting yogurt. They use powder mix instead of liquid mix.
I really don't know why sales have dropped so dramatically. I'm trying to that out. Right now I'm trying to increase sales vs cutting more hours.
Any suggestions?

Since: Sep 11

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#1218
Oct 1, 2011
 
I had the hvac people come out and check the hvac unit and they said it was fine. Do you know how many ton your hvac is? They said they checked the freon and filters. Everything was working properly but the unit was not big enough for the shop. They said I had too many things running in there causing the shop to never get cool.

I use the liquid mix so that my employees don't have to worry about mixing anything. Just thaw and put in the machine. Plus it's suppose to be cheaper.

I unfortunately have another business that requires me full time. Therefore I opened the yogurt shop and thought that I could pay kids minimum wage to run the shop. Slowly I'm realizing that I'm not making enough to pay all these kids. Not only that but have to worry about their taxes. When I first opened my payroll was 8.6k a month. Now I managed to cut it down to 7.2k a month. I'm getting ready to cut more hours since sales are slowing down. I could only cut so many hours before I have no more workers. If I could be there it would put 7.2k in my pocket.:-)
MasterH wrote:
I would go throughly with your HVAC. maybe the freon is low and it keeps running long till it hits the set temperature? I was even upset with $500 bill. I don't know if they have different rate for electricity in other states though.
I wouldn't trust customers' comments 100%.
I have a big franchise competition. I heard numerous times, their yogurt was terrible. I see a lot of people there.
I have another competition that uses the same yogurt. people come and say 'wow yours tastes better' I had to laugh inside when I heard that.
People have just different tastes. You have to make your own decision.
Let's talk about powder mix. I used those Original Tart Powder and mixed it with fruity syrups.
It actually tastes like real yogurt because of tart.
Some people like real frozen yogurt flavor and some people like a yogurt that tastes like an ice cream.
I don't use those powders anymore. it was more expensive and required more work.
I noticed all people wanted was the cheap yogurt so that they can save 50 cents. so why would I spend more money on yogurt when my competition is using cheap yogurt and doing well?
There are flavors that you can't mix on your own like cake batter, cookies and cream etc. you have to use liquid mix for those.
Try to save expense by cutting hours. I work 7 days a week. I take few hours break for several days but that's it. When the winter time comes, I would basically have to work open to close, 7 days a week. I hope this will make you feel better :)
<quoted text>

Since: Aug 11

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#1219
Oct 3, 2011
 
Thanks for the reply Master and Jan. Can you two or anyone else who has an active shop comment on the percentage of customers that dine in or take out?

Thanks
Stardif

Queen Creek, AZ

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#1220
Oct 3, 2011
 
Our shop in Arizona is about 60/40, with 60% staying. I know this is silly, but I didn't even order lids because I was naive enough to think that everyone would want to stay in my cute little yogurt shop...boy was I suprised! lol Tt was always important to me to create an atmosphere..people stay where they are comfortable.

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