Donna Maurillo, Food for Thought: From citrus preserves to peanut-butter cookies

Full story: Santa Cruz Sentinel

I hope all my little green Meyer lemons mature into fat, yellow fruit before long! Thanks to a class I took at Love Apple Farm, I'm armed with several new recipes, so not one lemon will go to waste.

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Hot topic

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#1
Nov 10, 2010
 
You will always find complaints about appliances online because most people who are pleased with a product don't bother to write a review. The complainers take the time to vent. The Internet is one big kvetch.

Convection ovens are always noisy, but if you get an oven with both conventional and convection options, you don't have to put up with the noise all the time.

Microwaves are pretty much the same across the board (even those with extra features) except for the outside appearance. You will pay a couple hundred dollars more for a built-in to match your wall oven, over what you'd pay if you purchased a freestanding one. So buy a cheap microwave and tuck it in a pantry, under the counter under the cabinets, or just plan some counter space for it. When it dies or your needs change, you buy another and don't have to worry about having it match or fit.

With any appliance, got the best you can afford. You can have problems with any brand, so what matters is the service behind the product. I've been pleased with Wolf, have had terrible problems with Monogram (both appliance and customer service), had a great experience with a Thermador unit, and have heard good things about Electrolux.
CapMom

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#2
Nov 10, 2010
 

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Best preserved lemons ever.

Wash and dry lemons. Toss into a ziplock bag. Freeze.

Thaw as needed. They may not be pretty enough to use as a garnish, but the zest and juice are beautiful in any dish
Missed it

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#3
Nov 10, 2010
 
CapMom wrote:
Best preserved lemons ever.
Wash and dry lemons. Toss into a ziplock bag. Freeze.
Thaw as needed. They may not be pretty enough to use as a garnish, but the zest and juice are beautiful in any dish
You've missed something there about preserved lemons, CapMom. The salt is there for a reason. It turns the peels (Donna neglected to say that you do NOT use the fruit of the preserved lemon. Cut it away and use the peels only!) into semi-gelatinous, surprisingly sweet things that partially melt into a dish like lemon chicken tagine. Frozen lemons are just wilted lemons.
Missed it

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#4
Nov 10, 2010
 
...dunno if that was clear enough. You do use the entire fruit when you prepare the preserve. But cut away the flesh before using.
CapMom

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#5
Nov 10, 2010
 

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If I'm putting up lemons, I want to use all of it, not just the peel. Thawed lemons produce a generous amount of juice and the peel is still useful as zest.

Lemon marmalade is also a nice way to save an abundance of fruit.

I've made salted lemons in the past and found them texturally revolting.
Just a Thought

Watsonville, CA

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#6
Nov 10, 2010
 
CapMom wrote:
If I'm putting up lemons, I want to use all of it, not just the peel. Thawed lemons produce a generous amount of juice and the peel is still useful as zest.
Lemon marmalade is also a nice way to save an abundance of fruit.
I've made salted lemons in the past and found them texturally revolting.
Freezing lemons is not the same as preserved lemons. "Missed It" stated everything correctly. Preserved lemons are used in many cuisines around the world. Of course, they have a completely different texture and taste from lemons that have been frozen and thawed. The salt is rinsed off from the preserved lemons before using in a recipe.
uh but

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#7
Nov 10, 2010
 

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Freezing is a method of preservation. I believe that was her point.
Just a Thought

Watsonville, CA

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#8
Nov 10, 2010
 
uh but wrote:
Freezing is a method of preservation. I believe that was her point.
I understand what she meant, but she missed the point of the ancient recipe of salting lemons and them with liquid to preserve them.
Donna

Santa Cruz, CA

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#9
Nov 11, 2010
 
Yes, both are ways to "preserve" lemons, if you're talking only about saving them for future use. But the salted method was originated in a time when refrigeration was not yet invented. The traditional dishes cooked in a tagine (a type of clay pot typical of the mid-east) used the lemons that were stored in salt to keep them from rotting.

If you want to freeze lemons, feel free to do so. But the two preservation methods are not the same.
Donna

Santa Cruz, CA

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#10
Nov 11, 2010
 
"Hot Topic," thanks for the oven insights. I didn't realize a convection oven could be noisy, but that makes sense, given the near-constant operation required for the fan.
CapMom

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#11
Nov 11, 2010
 

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No, I didn't miss that point. I said I had made them in the past and find the texture revolting. Personal taste.

Salting and drying are still popular methods of preservation.

Sheesh, I stated my opinion, didn't realized I'd have to write a legal argument.

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