Smithfield CEO feels Senate heat over sale to China

Jul 10, 2013 Full story: Reuters 18

U.S. senators sought answers from the head of Smithfield Foods on Wednesday about whether the proposed sale of the Virginia ham maker to China's largest pork producer could hurt U.S. food safety and raise prices for American consumers.

Full Story
Wall Street Government

Sebastian, FL

#2 Jul 11, 2013
Since more Chinese purchases of U.S. food companies appear to be likely, "at what point are we willing to say it's not in America's interest to have our food processing industry owned by another country," Senate Agriculture Committee Chairman Debbie Stabenow told reporters after the hearing.

Ummmm..........How about THE BEGINNIG.

China has a dismal record of safety in all their products.
Wall Street Government

Sebastian, FL

#3 Jul 11, 2013
Smithfield Foods is based in Smithfield, Virginia. The company is the world's largest hog producer and pork processor, largely due to acquisitions. Products include over 50 brands of fresh pork and processed pork products sold under the brand names Armour, Stefano's, Farmland Foods, John Morrell, Lykes, Patrick Cudahy and Cumberland Gap.

Smithfield's specialty foods division offers nuts, desserts and dressings. The company distributes its meats in the United States and internationally; predominately in Mexico, Western Europe, the United Kingdom, Poland and Romania.

Since: Mar 08

Allentown, PA

#4 Jul 11, 2013
Wall Street Government wrote:
Ummmm..........How about THE BEGINNIG.
China has a dismal record of safety in all their products.
It appears Americans weren't interested in buying.
.
The Chinese would have to meet American food safety standards.
Cat74

Barrington, IL

#5 Jul 11, 2013
The CEO will feel worse when no one buys his hams. There are other producers, with a clear record of being an American owned company.
lolol

Rio Rancho, NM

#6 Jul 11, 2013
china in the human food industry, it worked out so well for the dog food a few years ago didn't it ? knocked down the dog population nicely now will do the same for humans.
Your Ex

New York, NY

#7 Jul 11, 2013
LookingToEscape wrote:
<quoted text>
It appears Americans weren't interested in buying.
.
The Chinese would have to meet American food safety standards.
The Chinese have failed to meet saftey standards on EVERY product they ship to the US at one point or another. Are they turning over a new leaf with foodstuffs?

Since: Apr 08

Location hidden

#8 Jul 11, 2013
Cat74 wrote:
The CEO will feel worse when no one buys his hams. There are other producers, with a clear record of being an American owned company.
Unfortunate too as Smithfield has produced some of the best hams and canned bar-b-cues on the market for the past 50 years.

Since: Mar 08

Allentown, PA

#9 Jul 11, 2013
Your Ex wrote:
<quoted text>
The Chinese have failed to meet saftey standards on EVERY product they ship to the US at one point or another. Are they turning over a new leaf with foodstuffs?
These are US plants inspected by the USDA.
Cat74

Carpentersville, IL

#10 Jul 11, 2013
We order our hams through a Chicago distributor. We like them as well as Smithfield. I have to tell a man at church whose brother works there, and I don't remember the name, but I will put it out after I see Tony again Sunday.
Wall Street Government

Sebastian, FL

#11 Jul 11, 2013
LookingToEscape wrote:
<quoted text>
It appears Americans weren't interested in buying.
.
The Chinese would have to meet American food safety standards.
"American food safety standards"?

The ones teabaggers want to defund and disassemble?

Buried in the House GOP's budget bill, which passed last month and would axe $61 billion in spending, are major funding reductions for agricultural inspections. And consumer advocates warn that these cuts could escalate outbreaks of food-borne illnesses.

The House budget bill slashes $88 million from the agency that inspects the country's meat and poultry, which could reduce its operations by 18 percent for the remainder of the year.

In addition to targeting the USDA, the House GOP's bill also slashes $241 million from the food-safety budget of the Food and Drug Administration, which, among other things, could require the agency to furlough its 8,600 inspectors for an average of more than five weeks.

Republicans pushing such rollbacks insist that the country's food supply is safe enough as it is, and they've railed against intrusive federal inspectors.

Poor teabagger.
Wall Street Government

Sebastian, FL

#12 Jul 11, 2013
Your Ex wrote:
<quoted text>
The Chinese have failed to meet saftey standards on EVERY product they ship to the US at one point or another. Are they turning over a new leaf with foodstuffs?
You know they will cut corners and eliminate some processes to speed production.

In spite of a U.S. operation.

They will institute Chinese standards.

Since: Apr 08

Location hidden

#14 Jul 11, 2013
Wall Street Government wrote:
<quoted text>
"American food safety standards"?
The ones teabaggers want to defund and disassemble?
Buried in the House GOP's budget bill, which passed last month and would axe $61 billion in spending, are major funding reductions for agricultural inspections. And consumer advocates warn that these cuts could escalate outbreaks of food-borne illnesses.
The House budget bill slashes $88 million from the agency that inspects the country's meat and poultry, which could reduce its operations by 18 percent for the remainder of the year.
In addition to targeting the USDA, the House GOP's bill also slashes $241 million from the food-safety budget of the Food and Drug Administration, which, among other things, could require the agency to furlough its 8,600 inspectors for an average of more than five weeks.
Republicans pushing such rollbacks insist that the country's food supply is safe enough as it is, and they've railed against intrusive federal inspectors.
Poor teabagger.
Blame this on the Repubs....

Food Safety News:

Obama’s Budget Seeks to Slash Horsemeat and Catfish Inspection
By Helena Bottemiller | April 12, 2013

Buried in President Obama’s nearly 1,500-page budget released this week are two very specific food safety-related requests. The administration wants to keep the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service from inspecting horsemeat or catfish.

More here:
http://www.foodsafetynews.com/2013/04/obamas-...
Your Ex

New York, NY

#15 Jul 11, 2013
LookingToEscape wrote:
<quoted text>
These are US plants inspected by the USDA.
Oh, I feel so much safer!
Remember, recalls are voluntary.
Wall Street Government

Sebastian, FL

#16 Jul 11, 2013
Jim Shortz wrote:
<quoted text>
hey skippy, we will arrange for some Chinese guy to tea-bag you
Just like a teabagger, get someone else to do their job.

Take your homo fantasies here:

www.topix.com/forum/news/gay Cached

We don't want to read them here.

Poor teabagger.
Wall Street Government

Sebastian, FL

#17 Jul 11, 2013
Bama Yankee wrote:
<quoted text>
Blame this on the Repubs....
Food Safety News:
Obama’s Budget Seeks to Slash Horsemeat and Catfish Inspection
By Helena Bottemiller | April 12, 2013
Buried in President Obama’s nearly 1,500-page budget released this week are two very specific food safety-related requests. The administration wants to keep the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service from inspecting horsemeat or catfish.
More here:
http://www.foodsafetynews.com/2013/04/obamas-...
Good.

We shouldn't be slaughtering horses anyway.

So why have inspectors?

Cat fish is already taken care of:

Catfish inspection is an entirely different issue. The 2008 Farm Bill mandated a catfish program within FSIS, even though the agency is responsible for meat, poultry and processed egg products – not seafood (that’s the responsibility of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration). But U.S. catfish farmers and supportive members of Congress eyed USDA inspection as a way to curb the flood of cheap catfish and catfish-like imports, so the program went into law.

The Government Accountability Office has since called the catfish inspection scheme duplicative and wasteful. A 2012 GAO report questioned whether the USDA inspection program would improve food safety, pointing out that federal regulators are using “outdated and limited” information in their risk assessment for the program.

The GAO notes that, in the risk assessment, FSIS identified just one outbreak of Salmonella, but the incident “was not clearly linked to catfish.”

An FSIS spokesman confirmed with Food Safety News that over the past couple years FSIS has devoted staff members to develop rule-making for catfish inspection, but that there is still no program up and running. There was a proposed rule published in 2011, but no catfish have been inspected yet.

So they're cutting a program that hasn't been used?

Since: Apr 08

Location hidden

#18 Jul 11, 2013
Wall Street Government wrote:
<quoted text>
Good.
We shouldn't be slaughtering horses anyway.
So why have inspectors?
~~
Why shouldn't we be slaughtering horses?
Wall Street Government

Sebastian, FL

#19 Jul 11, 2013
Bama Yankee wrote:
<quoted text>
Why shouldn't we be slaughtering horses?
I take it you never had horses being a yankee and all.

Would you slaughter fido to eat?

Since: Apr 08

Location hidden

#20 Jul 11, 2013
Wall Street Government wrote:
<quoted text>
I take it you never had horses being a yankee and all.
Would you slaughter fido to eat?
No, I've never had horses. Rode more than a few.

Had chickens, rabbits, cows. I eat beef, chicken any of 2 dozen ways and I'm down with Welsh Rarebit.

Never ate dog, but if it was good enough for Obama, I guess should the need arise, I can also.

BTW, I doubt you could tell the difference between ground cat and ground beef.

They're animals. Animals are food.

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