Will fast-food protests spur higher minimum wage?

Aug 5, 2013 Full story: Northern Michigan News 711

Terrance Wise has two jobs in Kansas City - one at a burger joint, a second at a pizza restaurant - but he says his paychecks aren't enough to buy shoes for his three daughters and insure his 15-year-old car.

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Aphelion

Melbourne, FL

#369 Sep 19, 2013
Joe wrote:
<quoted text>
Notice a trend here. When you lack facts and moral standing to counter my position, you start the personal attacks. I will always have a soul and social conscience. You have nothingness in your dark cynical being.
Funny ... you were the one making threats, I just responded to you in a manner that reflected what a clown you are.

So we now justify the fact that you are an adult who is incapable of taking care of themselves, by stating that you have a soul and a social conscience. Reality check Joe ... we all have souls and in regards to your social conscience ... it's easy to claim social conscience when your on the receiving end of the freebie line.

When you join the rest of the adults who can take care of themselves, pay their bills and make a decent living come back and talk to us. As for now you are nothing more than a pathetic child, crying because you can't have your way. Grow up!
Joe

Brooklyn, NY

#370 Sep 19, 2013
Aphelion wrote:
<quoted text>Funny ... you were the one making threats, I just responded to you in a manner that reflected what a clown you are.

So we now justify the fact that you are an adult who is incapable of taking care of themselves, by stating that you have a soul and a social conscience. Reality check Joe ... we all have souls and in regards to your social conscience ... it's easy to claim social conscience when your on the receiving end of the freebie line.

When you join the rest of the adults who can take care of themselves, pay their bills and make a decent living come back and talk to us. As for now you are nothing more than a pathetic child, crying because you can't have your way. Grow up!
How sad that you continue to berate me for standing up for rights. The UN Declaration of Human Rights supports a living wage and the right for workers to organize and bargain collectively. The Declaration also recognizes that people have a right to food and housing.
Joe

Brooklyn, NY

#371 Sep 19, 2013
Today the GOP-controlled wants to kill people when they consider a bill that would cut $39 billion from the food stamp program. At a time when millions are unemployed and underemployed these sadistic morons want to make it even harder for people to survive.
Aphelion

Melbourne, FL

#372 Sep 19, 2013
Joe wrote:
<quoted text>
How sad that you continue to berate me for standing up for rights. The UN Declaration of Human Rights supports a living wage and the right for workers to organize and bargain collectively. The Declaration also recognizes that people have a right to food and housing.
So you believe that you have the "right" to a well paying job, Food and Housing? Is there anything that you believe is up to you to obtain and not expect the government to supply for you?

I will continue to berate you as you are a prime example as to what is wrong with this country. We are slowly being taken over by the takers in this world who feel that they are entitled to everything that the successful have earned in life.

You are a loser! But keep telling yourself that you and those like you are just the same as the rest of the population, even if your the only ones who believe it.

Keep your hand out beggar. HAHAHAHAHA
Aphelion

Melbourne, FL

#373 Sep 19, 2013
At this crossroads the choice is between two very different futures. The welfare state promises lifetime benefits for the entire population. Every American will be entitled to a safety net of food support, housing, education, medical care, child care, child tax credits, transportation, and a host of other benefits regardless of whether he or she chooses to work. Everyone will enjoy the right to this wide array of government benefits covering the necessities of life, but to pay for it, those who choose to work will be taxed to the point that they too live near the level of welfare recipients.

Eventually, the logic of the welfare state dictates that few will choose to work. Instead of a nation divided into "takers and makers," America will become like Greece: a society composed mostly of takers. And those takers will never willingly relinquish their lifetime benefits.

The dire consequences of this situation are not entirely apparent even in Greece because the Greek economy has been propped up by the stronger northern European states and by international loan agencies largely funded by the American taxpayer. Yet it appears that Greece may be on the brink of default, as large debt payments are due in March 2012. Once Greece is cut loose, it will face a very long and harsh economic depression, and until it institutes fiscal reform, that depression will continue indefinitely.

Economic depression is the endgame not just for Greece, but for the Eurozone as a whole and for America as well if spending is not reined in. In America one can already see the effects of Obama's restoration of welfare: higher rates of long-term unemployment, millions permanently dropping out of the labor force, stagnant wages, stalled growth, a dearth of high-paying jobs, and a shift of innovation and job-creation to nations in the developing world. In just three years, America has lost its triple-A credit rating, slipped from second to tenth in economic freedom ratings, and accumulated more new debt than it did during its first 214 years as a nation.

Ominously, the percentage of takers, those who collect benefits and pay no federal income tax, now sits at 49%. Anything beyond that and the country is lost forever.

Fortunately, there is an alternative future. Under capitalism, workers are not condemned to hand over 70% or 90% of their earnings to the state, and they're not forced to live at the level of welfare recipients. The free market affords ample opportunity for success for individuals and for the nation as a whole, but it demands acceptance of the fact that some will fail.

Socialism is an economic system in which no one is allowed to succeed, or to fail. But by eliminating the motive of competition, socialist economies reduce all workers to the lowest common denominator. Instead of success for the many and failure for a few, the norm under capitalism, socialism invariably produces failure for all.
Joe

Brooklyn, NY

#374 Sep 19, 2013
According to SEIU, over the last 35 years CEO pay has increased 725%, while workers have seen their pay increase only 5.7%. Disgusting.
Joe

Brooklyn, NY

#375 Sep 19, 2013
Aphelion wrote:
<quoted text>So you believe that you have the "right" to a well paying job, Food and Housing? Is there anything that you believe is up to you to obtain and not expect the government to supply for you?

I will continue to berate you as you are a prime example as to what is wrong with this country. We are slowly being taken over by the takers in this world who feel that they are entitled to everything that the successful have earned in life.

You are a loser! But keep telling yourself that you and those like you are just the same as the rest of the population, even if your the only ones who believe it.

Keep your hand out beggar. HAHAHAHAHA
You can berate me all you want. It doesn't matter. Do you know why? Because I vote in every election. And I mobilize low-income and middle-income voters in get-out-the-vote drives for our endorsed candidates. If our endorsed candidates win Philly big (and they usually do), our statewide candidates win and we deliver crucial electoral votes to the Democratic Presidential candidate by winning the state. So keeping spewing your obnoxious hatred. Because in the end, it doesn't matter.
Eleanor

Mundelein, IL

#376 Sep 19, 2013
Joe wrote:
<quoted text>
How sad that you continue to berate me for standing up for rights. The UN Declaration of Human Rights supports a living wage and the right for workers to organize and bargain collectively. The Declaration also recognizes that people have a right to food and housing.
This is America.

No one is stopping you from earning a living wage and using that money to purchase food and housing.

This is the land of opportunity.

If you are unable to find appropriate opportunities, perhaps you should complain to the United Nations that your human rights are being violated.

You'd have to stand in a very, very long line, though. There are people who are starving, homeless and live in war torn areas. The United Nations are dealing with VERY SERIOUS human right problems and the wage of a burger flipper in the U.S. is not even on their radar!
Joe

Brooklyn, NY

#377 Sep 19, 2013
Eleanor wrote:
<quoted text>This is America.

No one is stopping you from earning a living wage and using that money to purchase food and housing.

This is the land of opportunity.

If you are unable to find appropriate opportunities, perhaps you should complain to the United Nations that your human rights are being violated.

You'd have to stand in a very, very long line, though. There are people who are starving, homeless and live in war torn areas. The United Nations are dealing with VERY SERIOUS human right problems and the wage of a burger flipper in the U.S. is not even on their radar!
Perhaps not, but unions are very interested in organizing fast food workers. The average fast food worker is no longer a teen, but a 28-year-old who has bills to pay. Although their influence has diminished nationally, union are still strong in the blue states where many incumbent and challengers covet their endorsement and vaunted GOTV program.

And economic popularism is going strong in recent weeks. Along with the Wal-Mart and McDonald's strike, Bill de Blasio won the NYC Democratic Primary, corporate Democrat Bill Daley quit the race for IL Gov and Larry Summers withdrew his name from consideration to head the Fed.
Aphelion

Melbourne, FL

#378 Sep 19, 2013
Joe wrote:
<quoted text>
You can berate me all you want. It doesn't matter. Do you know why? Because I vote in every election. And I mobilize low-income and middle-income voters in get-out-the-vote drives for our endorsed candidates. If our endorsed candidates win Philly big (and they usually do), our statewide candidates win and we deliver crucial electoral votes to the Democratic Presidential candidate by winning the state. So keeping spewing your obnoxious hatred. Because in the end, it doesn't matter.
You are correct about one thing and that is that you and those like you don't matter. You contribute nothing but take everything. So continue to vote for your handouts, there will come a day however when the well will run dry. When it does I will be there to laugh as you and those like you scramble to find a way to feed yourselves.
Aphelion

Melbourne, FL

#379 Sep 19, 2013
Joe wrote:
<quoted text>
Perhaps not, but unions are very interested in organizing fast food workers. The average fast food worker is no longer a teen, but a 28-year-old who has bills to pay. Although their influence has diminished nationally, union are still strong in the blue states where many incumbent and challengers covet their endorsement and vaunted GOTV program.
And economic popularism is going strong in recent weeks. Along with the Wal-Mart and McDonald's strike, Bill de Blasio won the NYC Democratic Primary, corporate Democrat Bill Daley quit the race for IL Gov and Larry Summers withdrew his name from consideration to head the Fed.
We can only hope that as the losers in this country attempt to extort business for that which they did not earn nor deserve, more companies do as Walmart did in DC. When DC attempted pass legislation to raise the minimum wage for big box stores in the DC area, Walmart threatened to cease building in the area and pull out all of the 6 planned stores.

Score a point for Wal-Mart (NYSE: WMT ). Last week, Washington, D.C., Mayor Vincent Gray vetoed the Large Retailer Accountability Act of 2013, which would have imposed a $12.50 "living wage" upon virtually all new non-union big-box retail stores in the city.

While the bill did not call out any specific retailer, Wal-Mart was clearly the target. Wal-Mart pays entry-level workers less than $10 per hour, and it was in the process of opening its first stores in Washington, D.C. Wal-Mart had protested the bill vigorously, and threatened to pull out of the D.C. market when the City Council passed the bill.

Ultimately, Wal-Mart's threats -- which were probably not a bluff -- worked. This highlights the fact that even in a low-growth economic environment, most major cities need big-box retailers more than the big-box retailers need them.

As a result -- and this was made clear in Mayor Gray's veto announcement -- D.C. needs these retailers more than they need D.C.: even if most of the jobs they create are "bad" jobs. The same is true in many other cities across the country. In fact, a similar big-box living wage bill in Chicago several years ago ended similarly with a mayoral veto.

http://www.fool.com/investing/general/2013/09...
Joe

Brooklyn, NY

#380 Sep 19, 2013
Aphelion wrote:
<quoted text>You are correct about one thing and that is that you and those like you don't matter. You contribute nothing but take everything. So continue to vote for your handouts, there will come a day however when the well will run dry. When it does I will be there to laugh as you and those like you scramble to find a way to feed yourselves.
There will come a day when the ponzi scheme called "capitalism" - will be defeated. A business-model that profits off the exploitation of workers is not sustainable. How can you improve an economy, much less run an economy, when workers cannot afford the very products they make or sell? Corporations are making more profits than ever as the 1% reaps the rewards while workers are left with poverty wages and few benefits. How is that sustainable? You can only push people so far before they lash out. No one cares about your stupid free market theories when they're hungry.
Aphelion

Melbourne, FL

#381 Sep 19, 2013
Welfare & the Entitlement Attitude in America

In the early 1930's, the welfare system in America was a 'hodge-podge' system of local, charitable relief agencies and fledgling state agencies, funded largely by the modest resources of those charitable organizations, the beginnings of organizations like the Red Cross, United Way, Urban League and the NAACP . The state and government agencies did not necessarily provide the same services and they certainly did not coordinate with the charitable organizations (typical government inefficiency).

Then came the 'Great Depression'...

The public began to view 'Poverty' as a result of economic circumstances rather than personal failure (rightly so at that time). Therefore, the idea that social welfare assistance was a responsibility of government as opposed to a responsibility of charitable organization's, gained wider acceptance.

The beginning of the 'Entitlement Attitude'...

'Cradle-to-Grave' philosophy.

We American's owe that philosophy/policy to Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Now days its called 'Entitlement','Welfare' or 'DHS'.

'Aid to Families with Dependent Children'(AFDC)- now called 'Temporary Aid to Needy Families'(TANF), along with other programs like the 'Housing Choice Voucher Program'(Section-8) among others...

'The public began to view poverty as the result of economic circumstances rather than personal failure.'

So, in other words, the people started to think that government was responsible for providing for them; first because of economic hardships and failures, but later, as we will see, government programs 'conditioned' them to keep thinking that it was caused by 'Economic' failure as opposed to the truth in later year's-'Personal Failure'. Those government programs didn't give recipients an incentive to work,

'Or to even try to do better for themselves on their own'....

The whole idea of individual human dignity, the work ethic and personal responsibility, began to decline after the government started taking over the social welfare functions that were formerly provided by charitable/volunteer organizations.
Aphelion

Melbourne, FL

#382 Sep 19, 2013
Joe wrote:
<quoted text>
There will come a day when the ponzi scheme called "capitalism" - will be defeated. A business-model that profits off the exploitation of workers is not sustainable. How can you improve an economy, much less run an economy, when workers cannot afford the very products they make or sell? Corporations are making more profits than ever as the 1% reaps the rewards while workers are left with poverty wages and few benefits. How is that sustainable? You can only push people so far before they lash out. No one cares about your stupid free market theories when they're hungry.
Regardless of the outcome Joe, due to your victim mentality, you will always be poor and dependent on others. Much as a baby cannot care for itself, you will always need mother government to survive.

Sad
Eleanor

Mundelein, IL

#383 Sep 19, 2013
Joe wrote:
<quoted text>
There will come a day when the ponzi scheme called "capitalism" - will be defeated. A business-model that profits off the exploitation of workers is not sustainable. How can you improve an economy, much less run an economy, when workers cannot afford the very products they make or sell? Corporations are making more profits than ever as the 1% reaps the rewards while workers are left with poverty wages and few benefits. How is that sustainable? You can only push people so far before they lash out. No one cares about your stupid free market theories when they're hungry.
Not everybody is willing to settle for a career in flipping burgers.

There are bright, intelligent, hard working people with careers that are both financially and mentally rewarding.

Some of those people also INVEST in public corporations and profit from the rise in the stock price AND gain from the dividends paid by those corporation.

Capitalism has served America very well for hundreds of years.

No one in America should be going hungry. There are government programs that feed children in school and provide food stamps for families. There are local townships and churches that have food banks/pantries.

What you don't see is that Americans have so much disposable income that they CAN spend it on fast food.

If everyone was doing as badly as you think they are, NO ONE would be needing someone else to flip their burgers; they would be doing it AT HOME, for themselves, just for the cost of the meat.

Don't blame the corporation; blame the people who patronize those businesses.
Joe

Brooklyn, NY

#384 Sep 19, 2013
Aphelion wrote:
<quoted text>Regardless of the outcome Joe, due to your victim mentality, you will always be poor and dependent on others. Much as a baby cannot care for itself, you will always need mother government to survive.

Sad
I need public assistance because my wages are too low. The people who should be ashamed that over half of their employees receive public assistance are the corporate executives. For me, it takes courage to seek help.
Joe

Brooklyn, NY

#385 Sep 19, 2013
Eleanor wrote:
<quoted text>Not everybody is willing to settle for a career in flipping burgers.

There are bright, intelligent, hard working people with careers that are both financially and mentally rewarding.

Some of those people also INVEST in public corporations and profit from the rise in the stock price AND gain from the dividends paid by those corporation.

Capitalism has served America very well for hundreds of years.

No one in America should be going hungry. There are government programs that feed children in school and provide food stamps for families. There are local townships and churches that have food banks/pantries.

What you don't see is that Americans have so much disposable income that they CAN spend it on fast food.

If everyone was doing as badly as you think they are, NO ONE would be needing someone else to flip their burgers; they would be doing it AT HOME, for themselves, just for the cost of the meat.

Don't blame the corporation; blame the people who patronize those businesses.
It's almost impossible to invest, much less open a meager savings account with a poverty wage. The only time I can invest in mutual funds is when I receive my EITC.
Eleanor

Mundelein, IL

#386 Sep 20, 2013
Joe wrote:
<quoted text>
I need public assistance because my wages are too low. The people who should be ashamed that over half of their employees receive public assistance are the corporate executives. For me, it takes courage to seek help.
Joe, how come you need 'public assistance' and yet can afford the computer you are sitting behind AND the monthly costs associated with having the ability to access the internet?

Maybe if you had a little DISCIPLINE with how you spend your money, you might be able to make ends meet.

If the government wasn't SO GENEROUS with public assistance, I bet you'd still be able to get by.

Complain all you want, but the POOR in this country are still WAY BETTER OFF than the poor in other countries.

You have running water? Electricity? A roof over your head? You're not stuffed into a one bed apartment with 10 other people? Have more than one jacket, one pair of shoes, socks without holes?

You are lucky to live in America!!
Joe

Brooklyn, NY

#387 Sep 20, 2013
Eleanor wrote:
<quoted text>Joe, how come you need 'public assistance' and yet can afford the computer you are sitting behind AND the monthly costs associated with having the ability to access the internet?

Maybe if you had a little DISCIPLINE with how you spend your money, you might be able to make ends meet.

If the government wasn't SO GENEROUS with public assistance, I bet you'd still be able to get by.

Complain all you want, but the POOR in this country are still WAY BETTER OFF than the poor in other countries.

You have running water? Electricity? A roof over your head? You're not stuffed into a one bed apartment with 10 other people? Have more than one jacket, one pair of shoes, socks without holes?

You are lucky to live in America!!
Comcast offers Internet service for $10/month for low-income customers.

Second, the Government is not generous with public assistance when hateful House GOPers vote to cut $39M from the food stamp program.

The US is an industrial democracy. We don't live in sub-Saharan Africa. For all the wealth generated in this nation we can easily afford to take care of people suffering from poverty, unemployment or some other social problem.
Joe

Brooklyn, NY

#388 Sep 20, 2013
Correction: The House GOPers voted to cut $39 Billion from the food stamp program.

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