Our recommendation: Springboro voters should say 'yes' the first time to school levies

Feb 5, 2008 Full story: Dayton Daily News 31,302

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Just Watching

Cleveland, OH

#23381 Feb 9, 2013
A lot of bickering wrote:
I think it's safe to say that both the BOE and teachers union has faults in our district. I have no problem paying teachers a respectable wage to produce a quality education for my students. I also agree that some areas of spending in this district needs to be examined to determine if the results are effectively helping our students. The bad blood and bickering between both groups has led to a bad atmosphere in this community. I hope some kind of common ground is found soon if everyone is truly putting "children first". Lets find ways to give our students better opportunities and find effective ways to help our community grow.
I do keep hearing a lot about how 3/8 of our students are struggling, but how does that compare to other districts in our area? Does Lebanon, Lakota, Centerville, and other schools have more or less struggling students?
We cannot control what happens in other school districts, only in ours are we masters of our fate.

The people of this community pay to educate all of our children in a manner that provides them a fighting chance in life once they leave our system.

To dismiss these children as acceptable casualties in the battle of education is UNACCEPTABLE.

Not only can we do better, it is imperative that we do so.

2000 plus children's futures are depending upon our actions today.

Let us not let them down just because other districts are doing thus.

Where is the vaunted Boro Pride when it comes to helping those in academic need that don't happen to be our children?
Failed

Springboro, OH

#23382 Feb 9, 2013
Freedom of speech wrote:
<quoted text>
If there were people who wanted to speak in support of the conversion school, why did they not sign up to speak?
You have got to be kidding, right?
The majority of this community voted NO 5 times yet they did not stand up at board meetings and make a show. Perhaps people have an opinion that they don't feel necessary to be on camera spouting. The people that speak up at board meetings have a financial interest in keeping the status quoe and acting like they represent everyone in the community. We know that is not true because the community did not stand at the podium and tell the district to put 5 needless levies on the ballot yet all failed sooooo. Who did stand at the podium and tell the BOE to put them on- the same play list you see all the time.

What has been happening. For years the public education system has been funneling money away from education and feeding it to adults.

This system has intentionally disguised the truth so that parents and community members did not see the failures. If you don't identify them you think everything is honky dori and you write your check for property taxes. If the system had identified and made public the shortfalls in the system then they would admit they need to be addressed and low, the money would be redirected from adults to the kids. You see, this is what Babb either does know and she works to keep the wool pulled over everyone's eyes or she does not know and she is simply blinded by emotions and loyalties for the adults. Unfortunately either way she can be blamed for the charade and poor performances for our education system . People like her might even think they are doing good. People like her work for the cause all over this country and as such keep our nation a global looser in education.

Springboro schools does a fantastic job at keeping kids on a steady course. They graduate where they came into the system. I do not believe this school district takes kids from a lower start point to a higher one. Springboro starts with the best student population and needs to take them to the next level. Unfortunately, I don't think they do that now. We have those parents that teach their own children, take them to museums and travel to cool places to learn of history and other cultures.

We have a great formula here. We have the best kids, best parents, best community support and yes, some of the best teachers and admin. We could make Springboro a National leader because we are not afraid to address our students needs, first admitting we have some, but some people in this community are in it for the fight only calling this a war and not thinking about the kids at all. It comes down to pure politics and not improving our education system. Please help stop the people working to hurt our kids. Tell them to stop spreading vicious rumors and tell the truth its "for the kids".
failing to failing

Springboro, OH

#23383 Feb 9, 2013
A lot of bickering wrote:
I think it's safe to say that both the BOE and teachers union has faults in our district. I have no problem paying teachers a respectable wage to produce a quality education for my students. I also agree that some areas of spending in this district needs to be examined to determine if the results are effectively helping our students. The bad blood and bickering between both groups has led to a bad atmosphere in this community. I hope some kind of common ground is found soon if everyone is truly putting "children first". Lets find ways to give our students better opportunities and find effective ways to help our community grow.
I do keep hearing a lot about how 3/8 of our students are struggling, but how does that compare to other districts in our area? Does Lebanon, Lakota, Centerville, and other schools have more or less struggling students?
I beg you to stop comparing our system to other failing systems. We should never take comfort in others systems that are doing worse than we are. If you look at what cures a failing system look at GM but without the government bailout. When GM unions cranked up the price tag of automobiles and because low quality employees were not fired and kept on the line, quality and price made GM noncompetitive and the market swung toward other makes and GM lost market shares and had to adjust or go out of business. They did not go out of business as they should have because of our generosity but they have been forced adjustments and now they are coming back. The adjustments were mostly a power shift. The power shift from a union controlled industry to a reality controlled industry. Time will tell that this adjustment is short term because the union is still there and still doing what they do. Lets not bail out the govt. education system. Admit it is failing and let the money follow the kid and let competition rule.
Use the market to adjust this failing government system.
Failed

Springboro, OH

#23384 Feb 9, 2013
Failed wrote:
It's too bad that real reform cannot be discussed here. Anybody who says anything contrary to the Petroni line is labelled a union thug and dismissed without consideration of their actual ideas.
You are an imposter.

I have not seen any real reform ideas posted here other than what this board has proposed already in meetings. I have seen where facebook yappers are calling the community destruction and divisive behaviors a "war" on this school and school board. You can watch them on camera and on TV now.
I am anxious for any suggestions other than "throw more money at it". That is unnecessary and is not happening.
not so distinct

Girard, OH

#23385 Feb 9, 2013
whole lotta bull wrote:
<quoted text>
WOW! You're so smart! According to you Springboro graduates are failures with an inadequate education. What does that make the colleges that offer millions of dollars a year to our failing school children? How is the college acceptance rate so high in our graduating classes of barely proficient and less than proficient students?
Try not to pat yourself on the back so hard. You may break your arm. Where is the real college money going? It's going to parochial school grads.

Increasingly, colleges are looking at today's public school cirriculum and standards with disdain. Ohio's pathetically low cut-offs it sets on Ohio Achievement Assessment(OAA)exams is but one example for many colleges growing disdain.

Of course, in this world there are exeptions to almost everything. There are of course public school districts that indeed stand out. When public school grads land scholarships, they're representing cream floating to the top of the putrid tank of public education.

From the perspective of (some) districts adjacent to us, Springboro definately stands out. Springboro schools stands out for those who were born here and have lived here all their lives. However, from the perspective of the entire state of Ohio, aside from SHS's Blue Ribbon school classification, this district is not all that unique.

It begins and ends with a state-mandated district grading system that really needs to be flushed into the loo. At this instant in time, approximately sixty percent (60%) of Ohio's public school districts are rated either "Excellent" or "Excellent with Distinction".

Answer this...
If Ohio's public schools rock so much, why can't Ohio successfully compete for new businesses and jobs? If our schools are so "Excellent" and "Distinct" just the way they ARE TODAY, then why are a lot of Ohio graduates pulling up their roots to move elsewhere?
start using ginkgo biloba

Girard, OH

#23386 Feb 9, 2013
Freedom of speech wrote:
<quoted text>
If there were people who wanted to speak in support of the conversion school, why did they not sign up to speak?
Your memory isn't very good. The evening of Jan 10, there were speakers who spoke in favor of the concept of a conversion school for struggling and/or gifted students, ultimately for the benefit of this ENTIRE district.

Most of the rest of that 1/10 docket was filled with "those" parents whose concerns by and large are limited to that of the everyday welfare of their OWN children. It is unfortunate there are children in this district who are forced to have to deal with such myopic, closed-minded parents.

..."MY gifted child will NEVER set foot in any school that's run by NON-union teachers!"...
No OEA Indoctrination

Piqua, OH

#23387 Feb 9, 2013
The OEA believes teachers should not only be members of a labor union, but also should indoctrinate our children on unionism.
As the OEA dictates to teachers in their monthly newsletter:
“It’s essential that they not only be teachers unionists but teachers of unionism. We need to create a generation of students who support teachers and the movements of teachers for their rights.” How about they focus on just teaching our kids the core skills they will need in math, reading, writing, and science?

How about they leave their political ideology and unionism out of the classroom? As the National Assessment of Educational Progress results show, more than half of America’s 8th graders fail basic civics tests. Clearly, our teachers have enough to do already.

The worst part of this OEA indoctrinating dictate is that it involves a captive audience that lacks the knowledge and power to challenge what they are being brainwashed to believe. The OEA does not even attempt to be responsible about its desire to create a Union Youth –they encourage teachers to aim this message at children as young as the 4th grade.
The OEA approvingly recommends a website that “aims to inform children (grades 4-7) on current news and world events from a progressive perspective and to inspire a passion for social justice and learning.
The OE needs to keep its left-wing views outside of the classroom and its hands off our kids’ curriculum. This type of indoctrination isn’t a surprise coming from a group with a leader who once boldly admitted it was more concerned with getting more power than the best interest of our kids.
In The News

Piqua, OH

#23388 Feb 9, 2013
The Springboro Sun, February 7, 2013, includes an excellent and informative article "Accelerating student achievement through innovation and policy" which states, "As a board this past year, our policies have focused on many innovative areas to advance student achievement. We put technology in the classroom and recently bought every teacher a new laptop computer. We invested in new curriculum for our elementary students and added AP classes at the high school. We are building computer network infrastructure that will enable teaching with technology, and we approved new investements in our bus fleet and facilities. Through policy, our administrators are preparing our teachers for the changes ahead. Most importantly, we've developed a unanimously approved budget that prioritizes the learning requirements of our children." -
If you missed reading this article in the newspaper, you can still benefit by learning more about the accomplishments of our school district leadership and school board representatives during the past year, putting our children first, at the website http://educatespringboro.wordpress.com/2013/0...
Our Schools Our Money

Piqua, OH

#23389 Feb 10, 2013
Just Watching wrote:
The first thing we need to do is disabuse ourselves of the notion that we are the best thing since sliced bread. We have some deep systemic issues that need to be dealt with in this community in regards to educating our children.
1) We need to realistically evaluate where our deficiencies exist, both inside and outside the classroom. Education is not a drop your child off for 7 hours and they return educated. It involves the parents backing up and supporting the teachers at home, Requiring and helping with homework to make sure it is done. Not all parents are created equal, so we need to make sure that the parents have the resources to learn the material being taught so they can help the children learn. There seems to be a need for a study island for parents who wish to help their children but have been away from school for many years.
2) Just like there are no two children who are alike in their abilities, we need to recognize that teachers are much the same. Not all teachers are created equal, some are excellent, some are good, some are mediocre, and some are bad. Nodding our head at the union mantra that all teachers are excellent is a bit too Animal Farm for me. Let us begin to call a spade a spade and utilize our resources in house to bring those less talented up to speed or show them the door. The ones paying the price for mediocre or less ability are the very ones we are here for, the children.
3) Raising the standards by which we choose to operate and then enforcing those standards will pay huge dividends for all involved, from administrators, to teachers, to parents, to children, to taxpayers. We are not condemned to troll the base standards that the state employs, we are perfectly free to aim so much higher.
4) Real achievement that can be measured and quantified. While some may call that teaching to the test, I call that basic knowledge required to function productively in this society. Feasting on semantics to cover up failure is no substitute for actual learning and academic achievement. Rote learning of your math tables may seem boring, but the results are undeniable. Build self esteem with actual accomplishment, not with a false Honor Society where the top 70% of your class is recognized as deserving that accolade.
5) Recognize that not all children learn in the same environment and realize that other choices may be necessary. Some may thrive under a more rigorous discipline setting, while different children wilt under the same authority. Build programs that allow parents the choice of where their child should attempt to succeed.
6) We are not fated to repeat the past in hopes of gaining an alternate ending. We are free to reinvent the system, let us grasp this opportunity and move both our school district and our children forward now.
7) Speak up against the status quo and demand true excellence throughout the school district. Only the vox populi can stem this tide of mediocrity.
Springboro families and taxpaying homeowners need to speak up in appreciation of our reform-minded school board representatives and offer special thanks for their good work being accomplished by "accelerating student achievement through innovation and policy."
Should concerned citizens not speak up against the status quo leadership of SEA president Mr. Maney, respectfully asking Mr. Maney to offer due respect to Springboro families and taxpaying homeowners; who are committed to ensuring that the children of the Springboro community receive an excellent education, while keeping costs of that education affordable, by carefully adhering to responsible spending?
Why doesn't Mr. Maney stop wasting taxpayers time and money and drop this law suit; and just respect the will of the people by cooperating with Springboro families and taxpaying homeowners,
who are faced with this big expense of school renewal levy coming up this November?
Just Watching

Cleveland, OH

#23390 Feb 10, 2013
A recent blog has been celebrating the number of Master degrees our school district staff possesses, the question arises of how valuable are these degrees to our children? The answers may surprise the readers of a few articles.
The NEW YORK TIMES is hardly a tea party mouthpiece.

Should Teachers Pursue Master's Degrees?
Melanie E. Wright
In an increasingly competitive global economy, high-quality education for American students has become critical for the nation’s future. Most agree that a key to achieving this aim is recruiting and retaining effective teachers, as detailed in an FOC policy brief on the quality of teaching. How to define capable teachers remains controversial. Some have proposed mandating master’s degrees; in contrast, others suggest completely eliminating incentives for continued graduate work. From the NEW YORK TIMES blog Room for Debate to The Future of Children’s Excellence in the Classroom issue, many question the value of teacher education in its current form and seek alternatives.

Education course work has long been part of initial teacher certification and ongoing professional development as a way to increase a teacher’s capacity and value. Although only 16 percent of teachers in their third year of teaching hold master’s degrees, 62 percent of teachers with over 20 years of experience have earned them. Schools encourage this process by providing higher pay incentives and allowing substitution of these courses for recertification requirements.

Lately, however, degree programs have been subject to scrutiny. In theory they ensure that teachers have sufficient subject area knowledge, experience with teaching, and abilities to promote learning through effective and innovations means. Often, however, these programs have been criticized for teaching irrelevant and non-transferable skills, lacking intellectual rigor, or failing to build new knowledge or abilities.

A recent The Future of Children volume examined whether these programs are valuable and have positive effects on student achievement. Research on master’s degrees and teacher quality has generally been inconclusive, according to The Future of Children article “The Effect of Certification and Preparation on Teacher Quality.” This ambiguity reflects the difficulty in 1) establishing whether programs cause improvement in teaching, 2) taking into account the inequity of teacher distribution (with better teachers migrating by choice to higher quality schools), and 3) isolating the effects of graduate degrees on students of different grade levels. As Heather Hill documents in her article “Learning in the Teacher Workforce,” however, some improvement in math scores has been shown for teachers with graduate degrees in math. So far this finding has not been replicated in other subject areas, but it offers potential for more research.

While graduate work has the potential to prepare teachers and increase their students’ performance, recent analysis suggests that it is not currently meeting these goals. Although more research is needed, studies so far suggest that schools should seek teachers with and encourage the pursuit of graduate degrees in the teacher’s primary area of instruction. Programs such as the master’s in education should submit themselves to more rigorous testing to find what skills and knowledge can help teachers positively influence their students’ learning. Higher quality graduate programs and a more thorough understanding of their effects on student learning will lead to better education for our children.

The NEW YORK TIMES had an update this weekend on their blog with comments about master's degrees for teachers. All of these responses came from actual teachers, and most of their personal anecdotes echoed our research's findings: education and master's degrees rarely influence classroom performance, although some subject-specific work can be of assistance. Read more about it here: Room for Debate: What Teachers Have Learned.
Just Watching

Cleveland, OH

#23391 Feb 10, 2013
A recent blog has been celebrating the number of MS degrees our staff possess. This claim begs the question, just how valuable are these degrees to our children? The answers may surprise the readers of this community.

The NEW YORK times is hardly considered a Tea Party mouthpiece.

Should Teachers Pursue Master's Degrees?

By Melanie E. Wright
In an increasingly competitive global economy, high-quality education for American students has become critical for the nation’s future. Most agree that a key to achieving this aim is recruiting and retaining effective teachers, as detailed in an FOC policy brief on the quality of teaching. How to define capable teachers remains controversial. Some have proposed mandating master’s degrees; in contrast, others suggest completely eliminating incentives for continued graduate work. From the New York Times blog Room for Debate to The Future of Children’s Excellence in the Classroom issue, many question the value of teacher education in its current form and seek alternatives.
Education course work has long been part of initial teacher certification and ongoing professional development as a way to increase a teacher’s capacity and value. Although only 16 percent of teachers in their third year of teaching hold master’s degrees, 62 percent of teachers with over 20 years of experience have earned them. Schools encourage this process by providing higher pay incentives and allowing substitution of these courses for recertification requirements.
Lately, however, degree programs have been subject to scrutiny. In theory they ensure that teachers have sufficient subject area knowledge, experience with teaching, and abilities to promote learning through effective and innovations means. Often, however, these programs have been criticized for teaching irrelevant and non-transferable skills, lacking intellectual rigor, or failing to build new knowledge or abilities.
A recent The Future of Children volume examined whether these programs are valuable and have positive effects on student achievement. Research on master’s degrees and teacher quality has generally been inconclusive, according to The Future of Children article “The Effect of Certification and Preparation on Teacher Quality.” This ambiguity reflects the difficulty in 1) establishing whether programs cause improvement in teaching, 2) taking into account the inequity of teacher distribution (with better teachers migrating by choice to higher quality schools), and 3) isolating the effects of graduate degrees on students of different grade levels. As Heather Hill documents in her article “Learning in the Teacher Workforce,” however, some improvement in math scores has been shown for teachers with graduate degrees in math. So far this finding has not been replicated in other subject areas, but it offers potential for more research.

While graduate work has the potential to prepare teachers and increase their students’ performance, recent analysis suggests that it is not currently meeting these goals. Although more research is needed, studies so far suggest that schools should seek teachers with and encourage the pursuit of graduate degrees in the teacher’s primary area of instruction. Programs such as the master’s in education should submit themselves to more rigorous testing to find what skills and knowledge can help teachers positively influence their students’ learning. Higher quality graduate programs and a more thorough understanding of their effects on student learning will lead to better education for our children.
The NEW YORK TIMES had an update this weekend on their blog with comments about master's degrees for teachers. All of these responses came from actual teachers, and most of their personal anecdotes echoed our research's findings: education and master's degrees rarely influence classroom performance, although some subject-specific work can be of assistance. Read more about it here: Room for Debate: What Teachers Have Learned.
Just Watching

Cleveland, OH

#23392 Feb 10, 2013
Do Teachers Need Education Degrees?
By THE EDITORS

Robert Stolarik for THE NEW YORK TIMES

In a Room for Debate forum in June on the value of liberal arts master’s degrees, one group of readers — teachers and education administrators — generally agreed a higher degree was well worth the investment. They pointed out that pay and promotion in public schools were tied to the accumulation of such credentials and credits, specifically from colleges of education.

But current teacher training has a large chorus of critics, including prominent professors in education schools themselves. For example, the director of teacher education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, Katherine Merseth, told a conference in March that of the nation’s 1,300 graduate teacher training programs, only about 100 were doing a competent job and “the others could be shut down tomorrow.” And Obama administration officials support a shift away from using master’s degrees for pay raises, and a shift toward compensating teachers based on children’s performance.

Should the public schools reduce the weight they give to education school credentials in pay and promotion decisions? Is this happening already, and, if so, what is replacing the traditional system for compensating teachers?

C. Kent McGuire, Temple University dean
Michael Goldstein founder of charter public school
Margaret S. Crocco, Teachers College, Columbia University
Patrick Welsh, high school teacher
Jeffrey Mirel, University of Michigan
Arthur Levine, the Woodrow Wilson Foundation
James Cibulka, president, NCATE
Martin Kozloff, education professor
Linda Mikels, elementary school principal
Just Watching

Cleveland, OH

#23393 Feb 10, 2013
http://roomfordebate.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/0...

Hiring Is One Thing, Performance Another

C. Kent McGuire is dean of the Temple University College of Education and a member of the board of the New Teacher Project.

School districts typically prefer teachers with advanced degrees on the premise that these individuals possess a deeper understanding of teaching, learning and human development. In fact, in the district in which I serve as school board member, we typically look for teachers with advanced training (and experience). We are more likely to deploy these teachers in our most challenging or demanding assignments where a broad repertoire of teaching strategies is essential.

School districts typically prefer teachers with advanced degrees on the premise that these individuals possess a deeper understanding of teaching, learning and human development.
Like so many districts, we are persuaded that university-based preparation is key to acquiring the knowledge and skill we value and we are willing to pay a premium for it. We do look carefully at the institutions from which such degrees were conferred because not all advanced degrees are created equal. We prefer individuals who have taken their degrees from research institutions on the premise that advances in knowledge about how children grow and learn and the pedagogical implications of these insights are more likely to be reflected in the degree requirements.

But it is useful to distinguish between the credentials used in selection and hiring decisions, and the information or criteria we use to reward performance, once on the job. A longstanding tradition in education is to create salary schedules that provide automatic pay and promotion decisions based on “training and experience.” These training and experience factors, by themselves, turn out to be fairly weak predictors of effectiveness.

The real challenge is identifying the knowledge and skills that align with our educational goals and accurately measuring whether teachers possess and demonstrate these skills. Even if a formal certificate or degree is highly aligned with our goals, there is no substitute for well-designed performance appraisal systems that directly assess whether teachers are effectively using the knowledge and skill thought to be associated with increasing student learning. Most districts, I fear, do a mediocre job of assessing performance, especially once tenure has been achieved.

The good news is we have ways of knowing when teachers have acquired the competence and skills we value. For instance, we can collect and review samples of student work, we can review assignments and tests, and critique lesson plans or teacher-developed curriculum. We can regularly observe their practice in classrooms to gauge the quality of their interactions with students and determine if their classroom practices align with what we know about effective teaching. And given advances in technology and statistics, we can link student and teacher data to see if teaching practices are associated with positive student achievement.

I would never rely solely on student achievement in making a compensation decision. Teachers are responsible for much more than raising standardized test scores. But when used in conjunction with other information, compensation and promotion decisions are much more likely to identify and reward our most effective teachers.
Just Watching

Cleveland, OH

#23394 Feb 10, 2013
Another popular Springboro blog with a certain set is trumpeting the Performance Index as evidence of our AWSOMENESS in our education system in the Springboro School District.

The Performance Index (PI) is a calculation that measures achievement/OGT test performance at the 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, and 10th (OGT) grade levels based upon the number of students at each performance level.

The PI is calculated by assigning a weighted score to each performance level in the following manner:
• Untested students - 0 points
• Below Basic/Limited - 0.3 points
• Basic - 0.6 points
• Proficient - 1.0 points
• Accelerated – 1.1 points
• Advanced - 1.2

The percentage of students at each performance level is then multiplied by their respective weight, and the totals for each performance level are summed to get the building’s overall Performance Index score.

A perfect score would be to have everyone in the advanced classification in the school district. That score would be 120.

Springboro sits at 107.2 which seems marvelous until you look behind the numbers that support this rating.

As we know from past discussions, "Proficient" and below are essentially failing scores. Thus if you had everyone in the "Proficient" range, you would score 100.0 and everyone would effectively be failing.

Some of the "Accelerated" scores are also failing grades, yet they assign these 1.1 weighting. So if everyone in our school system were "Accelerated", we would score a rating of 110.0

Since we only come in at 107.2, those 2000 plus students not getting the education we promise really weights our school system down.

The Performance Index is another semantic sleight of hand provided by the state to make you feel warm and fuzzy about the fraud being committed in your name.

A look at the actual definition of each of the academic assessment level is telling in its brevity.

6th grade 2011 OAA Test Cut Scores and Scoring Bands
(This represents Springboro Class of ’17)

READING
Advanced.......76%-100%
Accelerated.....61%-75%
Proficient.........35%-60%

If a student was able to answer 17 out of 49 questions correctly they were deemed Proficient in READING.
In 6th grade READING, Springboro had 172 students out of 502 students (34%) fall in the Proficient or below category
______
MATH
Advanced.......68%-100%
Accelerated....58%-67%
Proficient........40%-57%

If a student was able to answer 20 out of 50 questions correctly they were deemed Proficient in MATH.
In 6th grade MATH, Springboro had 127 students our of 502 students ( 25%) falling the Proficient or below category

__________

7th grade 2011 OAA Test Cut Scores and Scoring Bands
(This is Springboro’s Class of ’16)

READING
Advanced 81%-100%
Accelerated 66%-80%
Proficient 45%-65%(45%=Proficient)

In 7th grade READING, Springboro had 172 students out of 413 students (42%) fall in the Proficient or below category
_____
MATH
Advanced 72%-100%
Accelerated 58%-71%
Proficient 32%-57%(32%=Proficient)

In 7th grade MATH, Springboro had 140 students out of 413 students (34%) fall in the Proficient or below categories.

8th grade 2011 OAA Test Cut Scores and Scoring Bands
(Springboro Class of ’15)

READING
Advanced.......83%-100%
Accelerated.....71%-82%
Proficient.........48%-70%

If a student was able to answer 23 out of 48 questions correctly they were deemed Proficient in READING.
In 8th grade READING, Springboro had 136 students out of 443 students (31%) fall in the Proficient or below category.

MATH
Advanced.......78%-100%
Accelerated....61%-77%
Proficient........35%-60%

If a student was able to answer 16 out of 46 questions correctly they were deemed Proficient in MATH.
In 8th grade MATH, Springboro had 203 students out of 443 students (46%) fall the Proficient or below category.
__________
Interesting

Springboro, OH

#23395 Feb 10, 2013
Masters degree for teachers have not been required for 4 years. Governor Strickland canceled the masters as a requirement. WHY? Because they actually found them to be a negative to teaching effectiveness. Yes even Gov Strickland the union supporter could no longer deny the facts.
So stop paying for them to get Masters and stop giving raises when they get them.

Did you know that? Ck with ODE
bodhisattva

Girard, OH

#23396 Feb 10, 2013
Interesting wrote:
Masters degree for teachers have not been required for 4 years. Governor Strickland canceled the masters as a requirement. WHY? Because they actually found them to be a negative to teaching effectiveness. Yes even Gov Strickland the union supporter could no longer deny the facts.
So stop paying for them to get Masters and stop giving raises when they get them.
Did you know that? Ck with ODE
Without a doubt, Springboro schools has many excellent teachers. But on the other hand there are a certain number of educators in this district that have absolutely no business being in any classroom. Our administators and BOE should reward the strong skills and strong efforts of the better teachers as well as demand the right to cut loose any teacher who is inept, obviously burnt-out, or is habitually insuborinate.
Just Watching

Cleveland, OH

#23397 Feb 10, 2013
County District Per Kid Instruction Total Costs Enrollment
Warren Carlisle Local $9,817 $5,751 $16,710,690 1,702
Warren Franklin City $9,712 $5,683 $28,275,666 2,911
Warren Kings Local $10,458 $5,826 $40,928,189 3,914
Warren Lebanon City $8,059 $4,361 $43,918,654 5,450
Warren Little Miami $7,959 $4,885 $30,510,420 3,833
Warren Mason City $10,125 $5,637 $106,346,812 10,503
Warren Springboro $7,926 $4,470 $43,540,274 5,493
Warren Wayne Local $8,274 $4,756 $12,169,454 1,471

Instruction means dollar amount per child for instruction. The difference between Instruction and Per Kid is the administrative cost of education.

At first glance we would seem like a bargain, but these numbers do not tell us what the cost is supposed to be, only what we are spending.

GM knew how much money they were putting into a car and how much Toyota was putting into a similar auto. The difference was fairly unsubstantial, what they were spending their money on in each car was the telling factor.

GM had, through judicious use of kicking the labor costs down the road, wound up with each car made supporting $2,000 retirees' legacy costs. To keep the cost comparable with Toyota, GM was forced to leave things out of the final production model. Toyota, unhampered by legacy cost could spend the same money on substance such as better engineering, heated leather seats, burled walnut, better sound systems, etc.

Both cars essential cost basis was quite similar, it was what they spent the money on that was the defining difference. The consumers voted with their wallets and the rest is history.

Right now all we have is the amount the school district is spending. We have no idea, however, if that is the correct amount, too low or too high.

Without evaluating the entire product, from results, to delivery system, to the changing modes of communication available to us all, physical plant, etc, it is quite simply impossible to make any definitive statements regarding our underlying cost structure that have any relevance to the quality of product we are delivering to our ultimate consumer, the child.

Those parents of gifted students will claim it is working perfectly, those 2000 plus students rated "Proficient" or below may claim otherwise.

Of note, is the fact that in the review of public high schools in the state of Ohio by USNEWS and World Report ranked Kings Mill, Lebanon, Mason, and
Waynesville substantially higher than the 110 spot that Springboro occupies.

#30
Kings High School
5500 COLUMBIA RD
KINGS MILLS, OH 45034
Kings Local
#816 Nationally Ranked

Larger than OH Avg
1,085 Students
54 Teachers
20:1 Student/Teacher

Above OH Avg
47% Tested (AP®)
32% Passed (AP®)

#31
Lebanon High School
1916 DRAKE RD
LEBANON, OH 45036
Lebanon City
#818 Nationally Ranked

Larger than OH Avg
1,481 Students
71 Teachers
21:1 Student/Teacher

Above OH Avg
46% Tested (AP®)
32% Passed (AP®)

#34
William Mason High School
6100 SOUTH MASON MONTGOMERY RD
MASON, OH 45040
Mason City School Disrict
#879 Nationally Ranked

Larger than OH Avg
3,043 Students
170 Teachers
18:1 Student/Teacher

Above OH Avg
38% Tested (AP®)
33% Passed (AP®)

#65
Waynesville High School
735 DAYTON RD
WAYNESVILLE, OH 45068
Wayne Local
#1324 Nationally Ranked

Larger than OH Avg
449 Students
25 Teachers
18:1 Student/Teacher

Above OH Avg
37% Tested (AP®)
22% Passed (AP®)

#110
Springboro High School
1675 SOUTH MAIN ST
SPRINGBORO, OH 45066
Springboro Community City
#1933 Nationally Ranked

Larger than OH Avg
1,468 Students
77 Teachers
19:1 Student/Teacher

Near OH Avg
20% Tested (AP®)
16% Passed (AP®)
Just Watching

Cleveland, OH

#23398 Feb 10, 2013
reality

Girard, OH

#23399 Feb 11, 2013
Just Watching wrote:
Right now all we have is the amount the school district is spending. We have no idea, however, if that is the correct amount, too low or too high.
Without evaluating the entire product, from results, to delivery system, to the changing modes of communication available to us all, physical plant, etc, it is quite simply impossible to make any definitive statements regarding our underlying cost structure that have any relevance to the quality of product we are delivering to our ultimate consumer, the child.
Those parents of gifted students will claim it is working perfectly, those 2000 plus students rated "Proficient" or below may claim otherwise.
re: the 2000 students rated "proficient" or below in OAA testing

It is easy to fantasize that each and every Springboro parent pays an equal amount of attention to the quality of their respective child's education. In reality nothing is further from the truth.

A certain percentage of households today are completely dysfunctional, often so much so that children find themselves running the show to a certain extent. A lot of families today are pieces put together from former families that were torn apart by domestic violence and or substance abuse. Especially if they have some type of support outside of the home, some kids find the resilency to not let a really bad home situation defeat their scholastic progress. There are rare examples of students that thrive under such tough circumstances, giving real life meaning to... "what doesn't kill you only makes you stronger". Unfortunately, other kids end up quitting high school because they can no longer deal with the stresses of school, combined with the hell they are forced to deal with every day at home.
Proficient

Loveland, OH

#23400 Feb 11, 2013
Is proficient basically considered being an average student? I want my kid to do the best possible and have a great education, but not everyone's going to have the same access to resources and opportunities to improve. I'm privileged to be able to get my daughter tutoring when needed, but I don't blame her teachers for her not understanding everything. I personally struggled with some lessons and skills and I expect my child to do so as well ....no matter who taught it and their education. The main issue seems to be the state's test and what they consider a good score. Is the test designed so that students only perform at 40% or better? I'm thinking a good measure would be a student taking the test in August and then again in May to see how much they learned. That would seem fair.

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