Choosing the Prefect Nanny
Tina

Uniontown, PA

#1 Sep 30, 2008
Nannies fell out of fashion for a while, but now they are back in style. Next to choosing a pediatrician, selecting th eperfect nanny could be the most daunting task facing a parent. But it doesn’t have to be an occassion for tearing one’s hair out!

The perfect nanny is someone who clicks with the parent’s character and values. You’ll want someone who is willing to follow your rules withought any hesitation or contradiction. Offering suggestions and advice is valuable. Ignoring the way you choose to run your household is not. Finding that common ground leads to trustand confidence in the nanny, allowing a smooth working relationship.

Now you want to make sure that same relationship will be established between your children/infant and the future nanny. Any serious canidate should be brought in for an evaluation day with your children/infant. This allows the nanny and children/infant to become aquainted. Infants operate by sense of smell, touch, and limited vision. But they do make implicit value judgements, just as adults do. An infant’s reaction can range from automatically crying to an instant mother-love reaction. Naturally, you’ll want your infant/ children to interact with a nanny who provides the latter feeling. Remember older children can assess the nanny’s personality in the first 5 to 10 minutes, so do not ignore what they express to you right away.

A part-time nnanny may have more than one family to care for. That introduces the possibility of exposing your children/infant to germs from others. This should be discussed during the interview process delicately, but decidedly. A perfect nanny will understand your concerns and speak to you honestly about the subject.

Another thing to keep in mind is, even a person finding their first nanny job can be a perfect canidate to hire. Everyone must start somewhere and a first-timer may be more eager to please you while doing their job. It isn’t quite the case that he or she may lack experience with children, either. Many mothers, grandmothers, nurses, and others regard the idea of being a nanny fulfilling. The best way to find out, is simply to ask them.

Once you have narrowed your choice down to one or two people, discuss details.

Propose a contract. If you hire from an agency, they will more than likely have their own. Include a 90-day trial period that you or the nanny can back out of without penalty. Also, ask and negotiate sick leave/ personal days, paid vacation, paid holidays, and medical coverage.

Remember, as emotional as the choice may be, you are hiring a professional to do an important job. Some aspects need to be addressed in a business-like manner. Good Luck!
Check out www.tinaschildtips.com for more information!

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