Tyler Proud says 'It's Time' for new TISD facilities

May 9, 2013 | Posted by: roboblogger | Full story: KLTV Tyler

The group pushing for the bond says they are a grassroots movement of parents and concerned citizens who want to make sure Tyler ISD's students are getting the best they can.

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1 - 14 of 14 Comments Last updated May 17, 2013
bond issue

Bixby, OK

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#1
May 10, 2013
 
I find it interesting that your ad supporting the bond states this will not increase your tax "rate". What they will do is increase your home value that will raise your taxes. How else do you pay for this bond.
Joe

Tyler, TX

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#2
May 11, 2013
 
Did you pay attention to the presentation on this issue? TISD has some debt that is being retired and the money that was being spent on it will cover the cost of the new bond. Thank God it passed and Grassroots America was dealt yet another blow. Now, the majority of citizens in Smith County might be fortunate enough to be rid of this ground once and for all.
bond issue

Dallas, TX

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#3
May 13, 2013
 
Joe wrote:
Did you pay attention to the presentation on this issue? TISD has some debt that is being retired and the money that was being spent on it will cover the cost of the new bond. Thank God it passed and Grassroots America was dealt yet another blow. Now, the majority of citizens in Smith County might be fortunate enough to be rid of this ground once and for all.
I did know about the retiring debt but this was not made clear in any of the ads for the bond. Apparently reducing taxes is never an option with government. You need to pay attention to how this bond money will be wasted.
J Smith

Tyler, TX

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#4
May 13, 2013
 
I am all for reducing taxes, but there are needs within the district and this bond makes sense. The recent bonds are a result of decades of neglect and inadequate planning at the behest of lower taxes. Now, we're all paying to make up for the sins of the past.
Ultimately, I'd like to see an adequate tax rate that would support replacement of facilities as needed without borrowing money to do so. Maybe we can do this as these bonds are paid off in the coming years, lower the tax rate, but maintain it high enough to pay cash for future improvements and additions.
bond issue

Dallas, TX

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#5
May 13, 2013
 
I agree with you Smith. I am not saying that we don't need to upgrade our schools. It irritates me the way they wasted money building the new elementary schools. All the fancy & expensive art, landscaping, etc. is not necessary for a good education. Teachers need to be paid more & reduce administration.
J Smith

Tyler, TX

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#6
May 13, 2013
 
I looked over the school plans and have toured several of the new schools. I can not say that I believe that they were fancy, had expensive art or landscaping. Do you have any specifics that I could go look at and pass judgement?

What would you have done instead? I think the schools need to look nice, but within reason. I've seen lots of new schools in other areas and the ones in Tyler are simply average. Maybe for local people they look fancy, but the schools they were replacing were trash and looked horrible. It's amazing what people can get used to.
jlm

Benton, AR

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#7
May 13, 2013
 
On the road driving into Big Bend National Park there is a marker beside the road and a grave. Buried in the grave is a former school teacher who taught many years ago in a small town nearby. The town no longer exists. The marker explains that the teacher would bring her kids to that spot under a cotton wood tree and hold class (this is in the desert). I suspect those kids learned a lot under that tree. I'm not arguing for or against the bond. But, I do think that buildings have very little to do with quality of education.
J Smith

Tyler, TX

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#8
May 13, 2013
 
While I love to hear tales of "the good old days", I don't believe that in today's modern society that educating our youth underneath the local cottonwood tree will bring our educational system back up to par. We no longer live in the days of the one-room school house.

I'll also admit that nice buildings do not equate to quality education. We do, however; have to find a nice median between the cottonwood tree and the Taj Mahal. As I said, I've been fortunate enough to tour several of the new TISD buildings and I have yet to see any of the alleged gross misuse of taxpayer monies that certain groups have claimed. I was appalled in the past when I would enter the buildings that were being replaced and found students seated around the edges of the room during a rain storm due to the fact that the roof leaked at numerous places in the middle of the classroom. I was also appalled to find that a chalkboard was the most current technology that was available.

I would ask that those that feel that the new campuses are overboard would give specific examples of the wasteful spending as I have seen none, I would like to view them myself.
jlm

Benton, AR

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#9
May 14, 2013
 
As I said, I'm not advocating one way or another for the bond issue. I don't live in Tyler anymore (thank God!) and don't have a dog in the fight. But, this, like many other things becomes a huge issue but does little to address the real problems. And, no one is discussing anything that remotely resembles a solution. I don't pretend to have all the answers but I can't help but wonder why so much discussion about this but none about the real problems with education. But, this is typical of many issues, the focus of discussion becomes something that will never actually solve the problem. Its so much easier to throw money at things or to demand that the government throw money at a problem than it is to do the hard work of coming up with innovative solutions.
J Smith

Tyler, TX

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#10
May 14, 2013
 
The biggest problem with education is the government being involved. No Child Left Behind and the onslaught of standardized testing is pushing the American child deeper and deeper into the hole. We rank near the bottom of the rest of the developed world and there has been no improvement in years if not decades. The Department of Education should be eliminated and we should stop teaching our kids to pass a test. We should educate them and provide them with critical thinking skills. Everything else will fall into place. Classrooms and other facilities must be conducive to learning though and that is what this bond was ultimately about.
jlm

Benton, AR

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#11
May 15, 2013
 
But, even if you get the federal government out of education, the schools will still be run by the government, just a different level. What we have in this country is government run mass education. If you really want the goverment out, lets talk about getting it all out. We should be asking ourselves, is mass education in warehouse type facilities the best way to educate children.

Here's what I propose (I know this would never be taken seriously because, even though people say they want the government out, they really don't): Do away with government run schools (with the possible exception of some specialized facilities for certain populations). Allow teachers to become entrpeneurs. Say you have a child in the 6th grade. The goverment would give you a voucher for each 6th grade subject (Enlgish, Math, Social Studies, Science, etc). If you were a 6th grade math teacher you would offer your serivces to parents in exchange for the voucher which you would submit to the goverment for payment. You would still have certain curricula and standards to adhere to, but you would be permitted to provide the services in any setting the parents deem acceptable. For example, a teacher may rent a space and hold only 6th grade math classes. Or a teacher may associat with other 6th grade teachers and, together, provide all subjects (like a small school). There are many possible scenarios and the market place would weed out the weaker ones and the strogner ones would flourish. This would give both teachers and parents more control over their children's educations. But, its so much easier for parents to simply drop their child off at the government run education warehouse and let them make all the decisions. Also, the teacher's unions would neveer support this idea. So.........we're stuck with inefficient, poor quality, government run, mass education. Pretty buildings may make us feel a little better about it, but that's about all they do.
jlm

Benton, AR

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#12
May 15, 2013
 
I recall several years ago hearing Walter Williams discuss the issue of putting more money into education. He talked about how the Washington DC school system spent more money per child than anywhere else in the country. Yet, they ranked 49th in outcomes. He then mentioned a private inner-city school attended by mostly poor children. The school had only a few hundred dollars per year per student to work with. Yet, a large percentage of the graduates went on to Ivy League schools. The point was that more money does not equal better quality. In fact, if you look at the increases in education spending over the last several decades, adn then look at outcomes, you will see they go in the opposite direction. The more money we spend, the dumber the kids get. There is nothing about taking a kid and sticking him in a shiney new building that will cause him to learn any better.
bond issue

Dallas, TX

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#13
May 17, 2013
 
I see in the Tyler paper today that TISD school board is going to raise the insurance premiums for teachers. That will lower take home pay. Seems teachers are always the first to take a cut in pay. Of course they are considering upgrading football fields Robert E Lee.
J Smith

Tyler, TX

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#14
May 17, 2013
 
This shouldn't be surprising in Tyler. The city touts their ultra low tax rate yet they balance they budget on the backs on the employees by raising insurance premiums each year to make ends meet. The school district has been taking lessons apparently.

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