New Charlottesville Do-It-Yourself Ga...

New Charlottesville Do-It-Yourself Garage Set to Open Next Week

There are 35 comments on the NBC29 Charlottesville story from Mar 29, 2013, titled New Charlottesville Do-It-Yourself Garage Set to Open Next Week. In it, NBC29 Charlottesville reports that:

A new Charlottesville auto shop, 22 years in the making, will give you all the tools to make fixes on vehicles yourself.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at NBC29 Charlottesville.

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Dude

Marshall, VA

#22 Apr 2, 2013
huck wrote:
"Finally, we should embarrass Democrats into stopping their fight against medical-malpractice reform and instead provide safe-harbor defenses for doctors so they don’t have to order a CT scan whenever, as one hospital administrator put it, someone in the emergency room says the word head. Trial lawyers who make their bread and butter from civil suits have been the Democrats’ biggest financial backer for decades. Republicans are right when they argue that tort reform is overdue. Eliminating the rationale or excuse for all the extra doctor exams, lab tests and use of CT scans and MRIs could cut tens of billions of dollars a year while drastically cutting what hospitals and doctors spend on malpractice insurance and pass along to patients."
http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9...
The contention under dispute is that capping damages will be “health care reform”.

Did tort reform lower the costs of care? Not according to the Dartmouth Atlas of Health Care (Selected Medicare Reimbursement Measures):

Hmmm. It appears that Medicare costs per enrollee went up faster than the national average. In fact, Texas reimbursement rates in 2007 were the second highest in the country.

Did tort reform lower the rates of uninsurance in Texas? Not according to the US census:

In fact, Texas has the highest rate of uninsured people in the United States.

Did tort reform result in health insurance costs going down? Not according to the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Medical Expenditure Panel Survey:

Did tort reform result in doctors flocking to Texas to practice? Not according to Public Citizen and the Texas State Department of Health Services:

http://theincidentaleconomist.com/wordpress/m...
huck

Charlottesville, VA

#23 Apr 2, 2013
"Since the employment market is controlled by large hospital chains which are in complex contractual relations with large insurance companies and the federal and state government, we are not dealing with a free market economic system......
There is no competition. There is no incentive to reduce costs. After decades of "defensive medicine," ordering lots of tests, imaging and referrals to specialists have become the new definition of standard of care. The old days when a doctor looked at a patient and made a diagnosis ended long ago. "

http://boards.medscape.com/forums... @383.MVqHaZbYd32@.2a34ce3c!com ment=1

"lawyers still take cases involving a victim who earns a high salary because Texas law does not limit economic damages, and juries can still grant multimillion-dollar awards for lost income. For lower-income people, or those who do not work, the only way to get a large award has been in compensation for pain and suffering."

http://www.boston.com/news/nation/articles/20...

Perhaps if on a national scale? I do feel the TX cap is too low.
huck

Charlottesville, VA

#24 Apr 2, 2013
TSCOUT2

Charlottesville, VA

#25 Apr 2, 2013
THIS SHOP MAY NOT BE FOR EVERYONE. THE PEOPLE THAT WORK ON THERE OWN CARS, TRUCKS, ATVS AND MOTORCYCLES NOW HOW TO SAVE MONEY AND WHERE TO GET THE BES PRICESFOR PARTS. THIS SHOP WILL BE ABLE TO HELP THEM COMPLETE THE JOB FASTER WITHOUT WEATHER ISSUES AND UNLEVEL GROUNDS. ANYONE WHO HAS WORKED IN THE YARD DOING ANY JOB ON A CAR NOWS WHERE I'M COMING FROM. WHY? BECAUSE I'M ON OF THEM.
Boodreau

Waynesboro, VA

#26 Apr 2, 2013
Dude wrote:
<quoted text>
The contention under dispute is that capping damages will be “health care reform”.
Did tort reform lower the costs of care? Not according to the Dartmouth Atlas of Health Care (Selected Medicare Reimbursement Measures):
Hmmm. It appears that Medicare costs per enrollee went up faster than the national average. In fact, Texas reimbursement rates in 2007 were the second highest in the country.
Did tort reform lower the rates of uninsurance in Texas? Not according to the US census:
In fact, Texas has the highest rate of uninsured people in the United States.
Did tort reform result in health insurance costs going down? Not according to the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Medical Expenditure Panel Survey:
Did tort reform result in doctors flocking to Texas to practice? Not according to Public Citizen and the Texas State Department of Health Services:
http://theincidentaleconomist.com/wordpress/m...
Dude if someone is using the equipment in the shop improperly, a lift for example, and gets injured, do they have the right to bring suit against someone who was providing them equipment that works properly? I support the idea of this business because it does help people cut costs. How long before some goober cuts himself and wants to sue? Same cut he would have got in his backyard minus the lawyer willing to destroy a business for his cut of the settlement
Boodreau

Waynesboro, VA

#27 Apr 2, 2013
Sorry dude last line should start same injury he would have got
sez you

Charlottesville, VA

#28 Apr 2, 2013
Too many lawyers. Shakespeare was right.
Dude

Bumpass, VA

#29 Apr 2, 2013
Boodreau wrote:
<quoted text>Dude if someone is using the equipment in the shop improperly, a lift for example, and gets injured, do they have the right to bring suit against someone who was providing them equipment that works properly? I support the idea of this business because it does help people cut costs. How long before some goober cuts himself and wants to sue? Same cut he would have got in his backyard minus the lawyer willing to destroy a business for his cut of the settlement
No, I'm not supporting frivolous lawsuits, or excessive compensation. In fact, if they use a lift improperly and it breaks; the shop owner is in his right to compensation for repair. I'm all for this business. Huck slammed tort lawsuits, which often is the only compensation one can receive for a violation of civil liberties or personal property. It is a generalization, and a fallacy that the majority of them are frivolous or excessive. Most get thrown out, many settle because there is cause, or it would be too expensive for the victim (and often lawyer the has to invest) to fight what is seemingly limitless funding. The large ones that get big attention are heard by juries, who most often want to be fair and get to hear all the details.
Boodreau

Waynesboro, VA

#30 Apr 2, 2013
Dude wrote:
<quoted text>No, I'm not supporting frivolous lawsuits, or excessive compensation. In fact, if they use a lift improperly and it breaks; the shop owner is in his right to compensation for repair. I'm all for this business. Huck slammed tort lawsuits, which often is the only compensation one can receive for a violation of civil liberties or personal property. It is a generalization, and a fallacy that the majority of them are frivolous or excessive. Most get thrown out, many settle because there is cause, or it would be too expensive for the victim (and often lawyer the has to invest) to fight what is seemingly limitless funding. The large ones that get big attention are heard by juries, who most often want to be fair and get to hear all the details.
Thanks just wanted to clarify where you stood on the issue and always enjoy reading your posts
Dude

Bumpass, VA

#31 Apr 2, 2013
huck wrote:
"Since the employment market is controlled by large hospital chains which are in complex contractual relations with large insurance companies and the federal and state government, we are not dealing with a free market economic system......
There is no competition. There is no incentive to reduce costs. After decades of "defensive medicine," ordering lots of tests, imaging and referrals to specialists have become the new definition of standard of care. The old days when a doctor looked at a patient and made a diagnosis ended long ago. "
http://boards.medscape.com/forums... @383.MVqHaZbYd32@.2a34ce3c!com ment=1
"lawyers still take cases involving a victim who earns a high salary because Texas law does not limit economic damages, and juries can still grant multimillion-dollar awards for lost income. For lower-income people, or those who do not work, the only way to get a large award has been in compensation for pain and suffering."
http://www.boston.com/news/nation/articles/20...
Perhaps if on a national scale? I do feel the TX cap is too low.
And those days should have. We have tests, and they should be used. Our very own Randomthoughts was diagnosed with fibromyalgia and it turned out to be Giardia. http://www.topix.com/forum/source/nbc29/TEO6N...
Too often we simply trust these doctors, some of them are down right arrogant about it, too. We should question them, it's called practicing medicine for a reason. I don't get too personal here often, but I'll tell you that I'm glad I took a loved family member to a second neruologist. If they say we don't need the tests, and it could have saved our lives? How are we, as individual, are going to know.
I get it, you feel that tort lawsuits are a threat to your "universal health care." They're not, as studies have shown, tort reform has not dropped the cost of health care, it has only enabled the wealthy powerful to prey on the weak with minimal risk.
Dude

Bumpass, VA

#32 Apr 2, 2013
*How are we, as individuals, going to know?
huck

Charlottesville, VA

#33 Apr 3, 2013
Dude wrote:
<quoted text>And those days should have. We have tests, and they should be used. Our very own Randomthoughts was diagnosed with fibromyalgia and it turned out to be Giardia. http://www.topix.com/forum/source/nbc29/TEO6N...
Too often we simply trust these doctors, some of them are down right arrogant about it, too. We should question them, it's called practicing medicine for a reason. I don't get too personal here often, but I'll tell you that I'm glad I took a loved family member to a second neruologist. If they say we don't need the tests, and it could have saved our lives? How are we, as individual, are going to know.
I get it, you feel that tort lawsuits are a threat to your "universal health care." They're not, as studies have shown, tort reform has not dropped the cost of health care, it has only enabled the wealthy powerful to prey on the weak with minimal risk.
Accounts of misdiagnosis make for good reads, especially when patient is passed from doctor to doctor for years, decades even, along with accusations of hypochondria, etc. My mom went through it with lyme disease decades ago. Medicine is an inexact science and medical knowledge still in relative infancy to what the future holds.
It just makes sense that reasonable caps and thresholds for bringing suits would lower insurance costs. The TX study results are counter-intuitive even to those who did them. Other factors as I pointed out, could be contributing factors. In any case I think the jury is out without more than one state and a few studies being held up as the argument against tort reform.
I naturally root for the underdog and like to see just desserts served. I can appreciate the threat of high awards influence compliance, but at the same time there are awards which far outweigh the injustice and frivolous lawsuits abound. Some legislative equilibrium wouldn't be out of order for the greater good, and (despite the TX study) lower insurance costs. And yeah, single payer is what I'd like to see.
Dude

Alexandria, VA

#34 Apr 3, 2013
huck wrote:
<quoted text>
Accounts of misdiagnosis make for good reads, especially when patient is passed from doctor to doctor for years, decades even, along with accusations of hypochondria, etc. My mom went through it with lyme disease decades ago. Medicine is an inexact science and medical knowledge still in relative infancy to what the future holds.
It just makes sense that reasonable caps and thresholds for bringing suits would lower insurance costs. The TX study results are counter-intuitive even to those who did them. Other factors as I pointed out, could be contributing factors. In any case I think the jury is out without more than one state and a few studies being held up as the argument against tort reform.
I naturally root for the underdog and like to see just desserts served. I can appreciate the threat of high awards influence compliance, but at the same time there are awards which far outweigh the injustice and frivolous lawsuits abound. Some legislative equilibrium wouldn't be out of order for the greater good, and (despite the TX study) lower insurance costs. And yeah, single payer is what I'd like to see.
I think you've been misinformed on how much they "abound" by the lobbies that are pushing for arbitration, and so called reform. Some lobbies make out to the tune of a thousand on the dollar. My interest is civil liberty and personal property rights. It is wrong to allow a wrong against an individual go unpunished just so in theory the collective pays less, otherwise you're defending the Great Leap Forward.
huck

Charlottesville, VA

#35 Apr 3, 2013
Dude wrote:
<quoted text>I think you've been misinformed on how much they "abound" by the lobbies that are pushing for arbitration, and so called reform. Some lobbies make out to the tune of a thousand on the dollar. My interest is civil liberty and personal property rights. It is wrong to allow a wrong against an individual go unpunished just so in theory the collective pays less, otherwise you're defending the Great Leap Forward.
You may be correct about frivolous suits frequency. I have not substantiated my comment with reference, but I did not state that wrongs should go unpunished.
I'm advocating limits so insurance costs are reigned in.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2...

Gvt already control heath care costs in other ways, i.e. medicare payout limits.
Dude

Alexandria, VA

#36 Apr 4, 2013
huck wrote:
<quoted text>
You may be correct about frivolous suits frequency. I have not substantiated my comment with reference, but I did not state that wrongs should go unpunished.
I'm advocating limits so insurance costs are reigned in.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2...
Gvt already control heath care costs in other ways, i.e. medicare payout limits.
I think you're looking at the wrong villain and buying into the big interest lobby propaganda. Take a look at health care costs over time and you'll notice they start to explode in 1973 and then again in 1986. Coincidentally Nixon signed the HMO act in 1973 and Reagan signed EMTALA in 1986. What is more plausible?

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