Global warming skeptics: What do they have to fear?

Jan 12, 2013 Full story: Christian Science Monitor 33

This video, titled "Debating The New Environmentalism" and hosted by Time senior writer Bryan Walsh, is from the SXSW Eco 2012 conference, held last October in Austin, Texas.

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Since: Jan 13

Fairfax, VA

#22 Jan 20, 2013
OK, the earlier posts weren't picking up earlier. Have had this problem before.

Didn't mean to post 3X.

Since: Jan 13

Fairfax, VA

#23 Jan 20, 2013
Oh, now its back to 2X.

I had to put it out 4X to get that.
SpaceBlues

Houston, TX

#24 Jan 20, 2013
Don't mind. The more, the merrier.
;-)
PHD

Overton, TX

#25 Jan 22, 2013
SpaceBlues wrote:
Don't mind. The more, the merrier.
;-)
And you think topix doesn’t know what you publish? Attacks on me won't delete or erase what you are and what you do. You should stop making an ASSumption of your---self before you know the facts. Do contact topix to satisfy your accusations of the reprint BS your posting of what I said. You are a dumbASSumption of your---self again.
SpaceBlues

Houston, TX

#26 Jan 22, 2013
Hey it is imperative that you apologize to the world for this:

http://www.topix.com/forum/news/global-warmin...

Remember you did it earlier today. I was not involved.

I'm helping you.
PHD

Overton, TX

#27 Jan 22, 2013
SpaceBlues wrote:
Hey it is imperative that you apologize to the world for this:
http://www.topix.com/forum/news/global-warmin...
Remember you did it earlier today. I was not involved.
I'm helping you.
And you think topix doesn’t know what you publish? Attacks on me won't delete or erase what you are and what you do. You should stop making an ASSumption of your---self before you know the facts. Do contact topix to satisfy your accusations of the reprint BS your posting of what I said. You are a dumbASSumption of your---self again.

Since: Jan 13

Fairfax, VA

#28 Jan 22, 2013
SpaceBlues wrote:
Don't mind. The more, the merrier.
;-)
LOL.
PHD

Overton, TX

#30 Jan 23, 2013
More scientific science fiction babble.No one really really knows.

Since: Jan 13

Fairfax, VA

#31 Jan 23, 2013
PHD wrote:
More scientific science fiction babble.No one really really knows.
Did you miss you said you didn't know anything??

LOL
PHD

Overton, TX

#32 Jan 23, 2013
Wallop10 wrote:
<quoted text>
Did you miss you said you didn't know anything??
LOL
No it is you that missed the fact of not knowing anything. Sorry my bad you do know scientific science fiction cut and paste useless babble.
Coal

Kuttawa, KY

#33 Jan 26, 2013
Just be glad you don't live where I do. Even suggesting that burning coal might be bad for the long term future of the human race is pretty close to blasphemy.

Since: Jan 13

Fairfax, VA

#34 Jan 26, 2013
Coal wrote:
Just be glad you don't live where I do. Even suggesting that burning coal might be bad for the long term future of the human race is pretty close to blasphemy.
science does track mercury to primarily coal plant emissions (although other industrial plant emissions have been a source too.)
In 2009, A study by the USGS (US Geological Society)

A 2009 scientific study led by scientists from Harvard University and the U.S. Geological Survey, for the first time proved that “Most of the mercury [in fish] originates from atmospheric fallout to the ocean surface and the subsequent transport of the mercury to greater ocean depths.”

They found that the ocean’s mercury levels have already risen about 30% over the last 20 years. Combined, the findings mean the Pacific Ocean will be twice as contaminated with mercury in 2050 as it was in 1995 if the emission rates continue.
For decades, scientists have tried to explain whether the methylmercury in ocean fish is natural or manmade, with some saying it originated in the ocean. USGS geochemist David Krabbenhoft and his colleagues discovered that industrial emissions are transformed into methylmercury in mid-depth ocean waters.
"This study gives us a better understanding of how dangerous levels of mercury move into our air, our water, and the food we eat, and shines new light on a major health threat to Americans and people all across the world,” U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Lisa P. Jackson said in a statement.
see more at the USGS website
http://toxics.usgs.gov/highlights/pacific_mer...

More citations.
--according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) burning the substance in power plants sends some 48 tons of mercury—a known neurotoxin—into Americans’ air and water every year (1999 figures, the latest year for which data are available). Furthermore, coal burning contributes some 40 percent of total U.S. carbon dioxide emissions.

==The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) estimates that coal mining and burning cause a whopping $62 billion worth of environmental damage every year in the U.S. alone, not to mention its profound impact on our health.

Source:
http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm...
PHD

Overton, TX

#35 Jan 28, 2013
Wallop10 wrote:
<quoted text>
science does track mercury to primarily coal plant emissions (although other industrial plant emissions have been a source too.)
In 2009, A study by the USGS (US Geological Society)
A 2009 scientific study led by scientists from Harvard University and the U.S. Geological Survey, for the first time proved that “Most of the mercury [in fish] originates from atmospheric fallout to the ocean surface and the subsequent transport of the mercury to greater ocean depths.”
They found that the ocean’s mercury levels have already risen about 30% over the last 20 years. Combined, the findings mean the Pacific Ocean will be twice as contaminated with mercury in 2050 as it was in 1995 if the emission rates continue.
For decades, scientists have tried to explain whether the methylmercury in ocean fish is natural or manmade, with some saying it originated in the ocean. USGS geochemist David Krabbenhoft and his colleagues discovered that industrial emissions are transformed into methylmercury in mid-depth ocean waters.
"This study gives us a better understanding of how dangerous levels of mercury move into our air, our water, and the food we eat, and shines new light on a major health threat to Americans and people all across the world,” U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Lisa P. Jackson said in a statement.
see more at the USGS website
http://toxics.usgs.gov/highlights/pacific_mer...
More citations.
--according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) burning the substance in power plants sends some 48 tons of mercury—a known neurotoxin—into Americans’ air and water every year (1999 figures, the latest year for which data are available). Furthermore, coal burning contributes some 40 percent of total U.S. carbon dioxide emissions.
==The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) estimates that coal mining and burning cause a whopping $62 billion worth of environmental damage every year in the U.S. alone, not to mention its profound impact on our health.
Source:
http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm...
Science doesn’t track anything it's the people that use science to track issues. Again you’re confused. There is another important issue of mercury in fish can you tell us you missed the second important factor. Now try to keep your scientific science fiction out of your answer and respond with your own peer reviewed published work.

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