Solar Power Partnership Wants to...

May 14, 2011 Full story: IBerkshires 36

By: Tammy Daniels On: 10:40AM / Wednesday May 11, 2011 NORTH ADAMS, Mass. - The installation of a solar array at the landfill will heat up opportunities for residents, businesses and the city to take greater advantage of sun power.

Full Story
First Prev
of 2
Next Last
cil

Springfield, MA

#1 May 15, 2011
we live in the clouds it rains more then half the time come on wasting money.. wind power i can see it happening... solar power where is the sun...i think they should scrap this plan ...then what do i know i feel asleep during this guys talk...lol solar power say no.. yes to windmills...just saying...cil
chbpod

East Greenwich, RI

#2 May 15, 2011
Solar power will not work in North Adams--- the City is under a cloud--- but wind energy will work as long as Cil flaps her gums
cil

Springfield, MA

#3 May 15, 2011
chbpod wrote:
Solar power will not work in North Adams--- the City is under a cloud--- but wind energy will work as long as Cil flaps her gums
lol hey if that's what it takes to save money i am all for it...just want people thinking ...just saying
Solarman

La Quinta, CA

#4 May 15, 2011
"The installation, one of the largest per capita in the state, is expected to generate between 25 and 30 percent of the city's power."

A 2MW peak system is 25 to 30% of the city's power needs. You could use technology like nanosolar or first solar on a 30 to 60 acre site and power the whole town. The CIGS panels are less efficient per square foot, but are better at harvesting power on cloudy days. With large flow batteries like the VRB-ESS that can be scaled to the MWh storage capacity, you could store energy from solar PV and wind for use at night or cloudy or windless days.
cil

Springfield, MA

#5 May 15, 2011
Solarman wrote:
"The installation, one of the largest per capita in the state, is expected to generate between 25 and 30 percent of the city's power."
A 2MW peak system is 25 to 30% of the city's power needs. You could use technology like nanosolar or first solar on a 30 to 60 acre site and power the whole town. The CIGS panels are less efficient per square foot, but are better at harvesting power on cloudy days. With large flow batteries like the VRB-ESS that can be scaled to the MWh storage capacity, you could store energy from solar PV and wind for use at night or cloudy or windless days.
so you are suggesting both solar and wind power. what about water think that's a need to?...cil
sher

Philadelphia, PA

#6 May 15, 2011
chbpod wrote:
Solar power will not work in North Adams--- the City is under a cloud--- but wind energy will work as long as Cil flaps her gums
I drive by the panels near Silver Lake everyday. It appeared that no one at the meeting asked about snow removal in the winter. If there is 3 feet of snow on the panels will they still function?
sher

Philadelphia, PA

#7 May 15, 2011
cil wrote:
<quoted text>so you are suggesting both solar and wind power. what about water think that's a need to?...cil
Go visit Bear Swamp to see how hydro power works. Let us know, missy wannabe smart, where it may be located in NA.
Solarman

La Quinta, CA

#8 May 15, 2011
cil wrote:
<quoted text>so you are suggesting both solar and wind power. what about water think that's a need to?...cil
The grid structure in the U.S. is broken into roughly 8 distinct major grid structures. Interties between grids is sparse and with alternative power an intermittant power source, the country needs power storage for both grid regulation and power smoothing. Hydro power is one of the most elegant power generation sources, but you have to have the right water source and land availability to create a large scale hydro power plant. Small hydro power projects can use battery technology for storage/ surge demand but it makes the total system more complex. You would store the energy in batteries and then use an inverter to turn it into usable house current and voltage. There are pilot programs that have been installed to use storage technology to store energy from the grid. Beacon Power makes flywheel storage devices for utility energy storage, A123 has been contracted to make lithium ion battery packs to store grid energy for smoothing and grid regulation. Sodium Sulfur batteries are also being tested and a couple of companies in Australia are using large flow batteries VRB-ESS to regulate the grid. It has been said that there are 126,000,000 homes in the U.S. If you put a 2KW peak solar PV system on each roof, and had an "average" 3 sun hours a day production or 6KWh a day, you would have generated 756 million KWh a day. If you put a 6KW peak system on each roof with 3 sun hours a day, you'd get 2.268 billion KWh a day. Can we meet our energy needs with alternative energy, yes we can, but first we need a place to store the excess when the sun does shine and the wind does blow.

Since: May 11

Location hidden

#9 May 15, 2011
I think its a good decision to use renewable energy sources.. Hope they (the companies) can do a good job in utilizing sunfusion energy.
sher

Philadelphia, PA

#10 May 15, 2011
SunFusion Solar wrote:
I think its a good decision to use renewable energy sources.. Hope they (the companies) can do a good job in utilizing sunfusion energy.
What happens when there is three feet of snow on the panels? How would the snow be removed without damaging them?
whiplash

Ashfield, MA

#11 May 16, 2011
just a reminder to all -- the sun is always shining.
it has been for a few million years. it will shine today, tonight and tomorrow.

silver lake is too toxic for snow to fall on it.

i'd guess there is some way to keep those panels at 33*F -- don't think that is a major problem.
cil

Springfield, MA

#12 May 16, 2011
whiplash wrote:
just a reminder to all -- the sun is always shining.
it has been for a few million years. it will shine today, tonight and tomorrow.
silver lake is too toxic for snow to fall on it.
i'd guess there is some way to keep those panels at 33*F -- don't think that is a major problem.
whee is the sun today where was is yesterday?...cil
sher

Philadelphia, PA

#13 May 16, 2011
whiplash wrote:
just a reminder to all -- the sun is always shining. it has been for a few million years. it will shine today, tonight and tomorrow. silver lake is too toxic for snow to fall on it. i'd guess there is some way to keep those panels at 33*F -- don't think that is a major problem.
Yes. The sun shines bright on my old Kentucky home but I am looking for an answer to "what city dept will be clearing the snow off the panels?" It is a simple question.
cil

Springfield, MA

#14 May 16, 2011
sher wrote:
<quoted text>Yes. The sun shines bright on my old Kentucky home but I am looking for an answer to "what city dept will be clearing the snow off the panels?" It is a simple question.
just like the remove snow from the sidewalks none that's not in the plans they will wait for the sun to melt it ...lol
whiplash

Ashfield, MA

#15 May 16, 2011
" but I am looking for an answer to "what city dept will be clearing the snow off the panels?" It is a simple question."

no city dept. will have to do it. whatta ya doin'? eating too much blue grass? the panels will be kept at 34*F with electricity. you remember when you didn't have electricity in old kentuck right?

there's another simple question for you.
Solarman

La Quinta, CA

#16 May 16, 2011
sher wrote:
<quoted text>What happens when there is three feet of snow on the panels? How would the snow be removed without damaging them?
You're kidding right? A simple Google search gives sites like ehow.com , several articles written by those who have installed solar panels and have cleaned the snow from them when necessary. It seems some use the Garelick Roof Rake to clear snow from the panels. If you really have three feet of snow accumulation, then many roofs would not stand up to the snow load and the panel array weight. In that case putting the panels on an elevated tracking mount would be a better solution.
cil

Springfield, MA

#17 May 17, 2011
i ask where the dun again to day?solar power is wasting money... just saying... the mountain hide the sun. it doesn't take a rocket scientist to figure it out...cil
sher

Philadelphia, PA

#18 May 18, 2011
Solarman. I think solar is GREAT. You are talking about a few panels on private houses. I am talking about many panels all together. How will the city keep up snow removal during a blizzard?
whiplash

Easthampton, MA

#19 May 18, 2011
there is not much sun shine during a blizzard.
Solarman

La Quinta, CA

#20 May 18, 2011
sher wrote:
Solarman. I think solar is GREAT. You are talking about a few panels on private houses. I am talking about many panels all together. How will the city keep up snow removal during a blizzard?
My point would be, a few panels on each home would do a better job than large generation arrays that would need to be "shipped" to homes. Using the generated product right where it is generated and used is much more efficient. There are still tracking array mounts that can be swiveled to help slide the snow off of the panels.

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker
First Prev
of 2
Next Last

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Alternative Energy Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
Expert: We must act fast on warming (Sep '08) 38 min Earthling-1 27,951
Frustrated by vandals, thieves WPEC seeks commu... (May '11) 6 hr Annual Winter Sol... 13
Australian scientists announce solar energy bre... Mon Gavin62 10
Here's what appraisers need to know about solar... Dec 14 Soalrman 9
UK's a 46 billion bid for EIB nuclear loan Dec 13 Clear Dharma 1
Washington's Central Bank delegation views MOW'... Dec 13 MOMIN ANSARI 2
NCWARN runs ad criticizing Duke Energy's approa... Dec 13 Solarman 1