Study: Most teachers pan No Child Lef...

Study: Most teachers pan No Child Left Behind

There are 44 comments on the San Bernardino County Sun story from Apr 10, 2010, titled Study: Most teachers pan No Child Left Behind. In it, San Bernardino County Sun reports that:

As early as kindergarten, California teachers spend as much as 40 minutes to an hour a day doing assessments of their small charges in preparation for the years of testing to come.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at San Bernardino County Sun.

gilman

Covina, CA

#21 Apr 11, 2010
Kim wrote:
Dear Gilman, Three years ago I had a child walk into my class that could not identify letters of the alphabet. By year'send he could read at a first grade level. That is almost 2 full yr's growth. Yet according to grade level standards , he was still way below. This makes lots of sense to ane in the teahing field!
Dear Kim, I get it. You should be proud of the results you help the student achieve.

However, if this student was part of a regular, mainstream classroom setting....well, one has to ask how many good students were ignored due to the extra time required for the student you mention. It would appear that this child should be in a special class for kids with learning issues....a class that would not be subject to the test standards.
Nan Cee

La Puente, CA

#22 Apr 11, 2010
Oh Felipe!
Do you HAVE children? Learning is so much more than just the facts. I think you are so far off base that I cannot even begin to discuss this with you. Volunteer at a school, become invested in a group of students, care about them a whole lot, and THEN you can decide if teaching is only about standards.There must be an element of fun, these are kids. Until that time, you have nothing but opinions. Opinions are like assholes, everyone has one.
Felipe wrote:
Most teachers oppose NCLB because it was put in place by a Republican, and teacher credential programs are Marxist/feminist/multicultural ist indoctrination camps.
NCLB standards are only mandatory if schools want the extra federal funding.
I didn't know teaching was supposed to be fun.
If not to standards, to what are teachers to teach -- feelings?
A privatized system with free-market solutions and approaches including internet-based consumer and employer ratings, comments, and rankings would make all this top-down one-size-fits-all thinking a thing of the past.
Privatize.
Privatize.
Privatize.
Green Goat

United States

#23 Apr 11, 2010
Teachers can't teach the students who want to learn because of the misfits. Teachers can't get rid of the misfits and nothing every happens to the misfits for acting up. Nothing is going to get better until students and parents are held accountable.(And politicians, get out of our classrooms!)
AO Teacher

United States

#24 Apr 11, 2010
Um, NCLB was signed into law by President Bush, but NCLB was sponsored in the Senate by Ted Kennedy. NCLB is less about politics, and more about holding teachers accountable for the results of deeply flawed assessments. President Obama is currently seeking to expand the Federal role in education. Blaming teachers for test results is like blaming the police for criminal behavior. There is no test that will make a student value achievement. Though privatization has its merits, most private schools employ teachers with lower qualifications than are required of public teachers in California, and fewer years of experience.
Felipe wrote:
Most teachers oppose NCLB because it was put in place by a Republican, and teacher credential programs are Marxist/feminist/multicultural ist indoctrination camps.
NCLB standards are only mandatory if schools want the extra federal funding.
I didn't know teaching was supposed to be fun.
If not to standards, to what are teachers to teach -- feelings?
A privatized system with free-market solutions and approaches including internet-based consumer and employer ratings, comments, and rankings would make all this top-down one-size-fits-all thinking a thing of the past.
Privatize.
Privatize.
Privatize.
AO Teacher

United States

#25 Apr 11, 2010
Fred wrote:
How much money does all this cost the taxpayer?
In California, over $100 million per year. In a budgetary environment in which everything is under the axe, it is curious that no one talks about reducing the cost of standardized tests. I'd love to see the contract that Harcourt-Brace has with the state.
PerformanceBased

Temecula, CA

#26 Apr 11, 2010
Teaching is one of the few professions where your measurement of performance can be based solely on a test dependent upon the mood, temperament, home environment, and diligence of an 8-year old. I know a teacher who has seen students marking answers on their test sheets simply because they like the pattern the bubbles make. Also, little Johnny may be more worried about why Daddy takes drugs and beats on Mommy every night and why they have to move from motel to motel each week than doing well on a test. Don't say this is speculation. This is reality for the school district in my area. I'm all for performance based salary, but let's let it be dependent on the evaluation of teaching techniques and adherence to policy by a Principal who has a degree in education. In other words, let our immediate supervisor determine our performance, not a test that may or may not be reflective of student skills. Indeed, why should teachers be treated different from everybody else?

“Timing & Distance!”

Since: Jul 08

Topanga, CA

#27 Apr 11, 2010
PerformanceBased wrote:
Teaching is one of the few professions where your measurement of performance can be based solely on a test dependent upon the mood, temperament, home environment, and diligence of an 8-year old. I know a teacher who has seen students marking answers on their test sheets simply because they like the pattern the bubbles make. Also, little Johnny may be more worried about why Daddy takes drugs and beats on Mommy every night and why they have to move from motel to motel each week than doing well on a test. Don't say this is speculation. This is reality for the school district in my area. I'm all for performance based salary, but let's let it be dependent on the evaluation of teaching techniques and adherence to policy by a Principal who has a degree in education. In other words, let our immediate supervisor determine our performance, not a test that may or may not be reflective of student skills. Indeed, why should teachers be treated different from everybody else?
Well said.
PerformanceBased

Temecula, CA

#28 Apr 11, 2010
The problem is, placing a student in a "special class" requires parental permission and $$$. We don't have the $$$ and you'd be surprised how many parents refuse to put their students in RSP or SDC ("special classes", look it up). They are either in denial that their child is not mainsteam (general Ed) or they are fearful of their child being labeled for the rest of their life. Although the latter may be a legitimate concern, it is not fair to let the child get further and further behind and to take away critical time from the mainstream kids. Oh, and by the way, those kids in the "special classes" ARE required to take the same test as everyone else and their scores DO count.
gilman wrote:
<quoted text>
Dear Kim, I get it. You should be proud of the results you help the student achieve.
However, if this student was part of a regular, mainstream classroom setting....well, one has to ask how many good students were ignored due to the extra time required for the student you mention. It would appear that this child should be in a special class for kids with learning issues....a class that would not be subject to the test standards.
Kim

Kapolei, HI

#29 Apr 12, 2010
Well said "Performance Based!"
NTLB

Running Springs, CA

#30 Apr 12, 2010
gilman wrote:
<quoted text>
Pretty accurate statements. To go a step further, children which come from a stable home life are forced into classes with the children outlined above...the result is what we have now. Teachers spending their time with the problem children while the others receive little attention?
Most colleges, decent ones anyway, gave up using a single measure for entry a very long time ago. Besides, you can take that test over and over again, not the case here. As for low standards, every study ever done on the matter shows that California has some of the highest academic standards in the country. I've never seen us out of the top 5.

Oh, and second language students have made more growth and scored higher than all other subgroups in the past few years. If you want to look at demographics, that's not the one to look at. There is an entire department set up for a completely different group that has kept many SB schools from meeting their goals. My school missed it a couple of years ago by one student in one subgroup. Yes, the school made it. One more kids in one more subgroup in one more grade and we would have been considered passing.

Most people have really no idea how this test and the scores are really done. They are hardly concrete. They actually continuously change them for a school throughout the next school year. Ours has been changed by four points this year. May not sound like a lot, but it can make a huge difference. What changed scores that have been done for almost a year now? Who really knows.
Marie

United States

#31 Apr 12, 2010
I agree that an undue emphasis on "closing the gap" has caused our teaching time to be used to help students who struggle the most at the detriment of the others. In a staff meeting at the beginning of the year, we were shown a graph of how bringing up the test scores of the below basic students would increase our school's scores more than spending our efforts to bring up the scores of the basic and the proficient students. Obviously, since we only have a limited amount of time and energy, we were told that it was our job to focus on bringing up the scores of the below basic students. Pretty soon, the parents of the basic and proficient students are going to figure out that their students are getting short-changed - maybe that's what it will take to ensure the restoration of a sane balance.
Marie

United States

#32 Apr 12, 2010
Well stated - the scores go up as schools learn how to game the system, all for a goal that misses the mark. It reminds me of "Little Miss Sunshine." We're all asked to push a van that doesn't work toward a goal that is really stupid and inappropriate (Little Miss Sunshine's insane routine). But hey, "united we stand", that's what's important right?(if you've seen the movie, note the billboard in the field when the son decides to get back into the van).
Marie

United States

#33 Apr 12, 2010
Sorry I didn't reference the post in my previous comment (#32). I was commenting on the great statements posted in comment #11 - in part the comment stated, "The goal distortion that occurred as a result of this law has actually reduced the quality of education our kids receive. The scores are going up as schools game the system, but kids are suffering. It will always be this way as long as punitive measures are used in an attempt to induce reform. If a person is threatened with punishment, they'll do whatever it takes to avoid it."
Riley

Hacienda Heights, CA

#34 Apr 12, 2010
Felipe wrote:
teacher credential programs are Marxist/feminist/multicultural ist indoctrination camps.
Thing is - this comment actually makes sense. Especially when you figure most teachers come from the Cal State System, which is full of liberals.
Jimmy

Rancho Cucamonga, CA

#35 Apr 13, 2010
Kim wrote:
I see more and more cheating. Scores not up enough?; teachers aren't doing their jobs;Scores up too much, somebody's changing the answers. It's a no win situation.
WHERE EXACTLY HAVE YOU SEEN CHEATING?
Kim

Kapolei, HI

#36 Apr 13, 2010
Atlanta , Georgia schools were ust on the news for this issue.
tnmtndude

Châteauguay, Canada

#37 Jul 20, 2012
Most teachers spank on child's left behind.
Phil

London, UK

#38 Jul 23, 2012
"Most teachers spank on child's left behind"

Bob, grow up, you pathetic immature perverted child.
Stop embarrassing yourself.
You are not even slightly funny.
Bob

Châteauguay, Canada

#39 Jul 24, 2012
Oh look, it's Phil the Phallus trying to be intelligent. Any minute now Peggy will be back to insult you some more.
Phil

London, UK

#40 Jul 25, 2012
Like I said Bob, grow up.
You are not funny.
Sad yes, funny, no.

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