Study: Most teachers pan No Child Left Behind

As early as kindergarten, California teachers spend as much as 40 minutes to an hour a day doing assessments of their small charges in preparation for the years of testing to come. Full Story
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Bill

Redlands, CA

#1 Apr 11, 2010
All state testing is meaningless to students because they are not held accountable. Students should not be allowed to go to the next grade unless they pass the CSTs/
Felipe

Upland, CA

#2 Apr 11, 2010
Most teachers oppose NCLB because it was put in place by a Republican, and teacher credential programs are Marxist/feminist/multicultural ist indoctrination camps.

NCLB standards are only mandatory if schools want the extra federal funding.

I didn't know teaching was supposed to be fun.

If not to standards, to what are teachers to teach -- feelings?

A privatized system with free-market solutions and approaches including internet-based consumer and employer ratings, comments, and rankings would make all this top-down one-size-fits-all thinking a thing of the past.

Privatize.
Privatize.
Privatize.

“Timing & Distance!”

Since: Jul 08

San Bernardino, CA

#3 Apr 11, 2010
Felipe wrote:
Most teachers oppose NCLB because it was put in place by a Republican, and teacher credential programs are Marxist/feminist/multicultural ist indoctrination camps.
Ohhhhhhhh...... so THAT is why teachers oppose NCLB.

hahahahahahahahaha

thanks for the chuckle.
What

Ontario, CA

#4 Apr 11, 2010
Bill wrote:
All state testing is meaningless to students because they are not held accountable. Students should not be allowed to go to the next grade unless they pass the CSTs/
Bill is correct. Students who fail tests should be held back. It is a clear indication that the child is not ready for the next level. Actually I found combo classes with multiple grades in one class work best for the student. This type of teaching mirrors private education closely.

The next group to be held accountable are the teachers. They need to be incentivised by the testing as well as punished. Sub standard performance means lack luster wages. High performance means hogher wages.

Finally local control of local curriculum and schools. Locality believes touchy feely education standards are best the testing will provide results.

Take the graft out of education. This includes Unionization as well as the curriculum/book selling whores. This is where the waste is greatest.
Bill

Redlands, CA

#5 Apr 11, 2010
What private school is going to take the gangbangers, the special ed students, the bad behaving students, and the low attending students? What private school is going to put up with their parents? Drug addicts, prison felons, and other welfare / entitlement lowlifes are not very supportive when it comes to education. Schools are failing because families are failing.
RanchoGuy

Hesperia, CA

#6 Apr 11, 2010
One reason private school students fair better is that they are highly motivated. If the parent is paying for private school, they are likely to be more involved with the child to make sure that their money is spent wisely. For some parents whose child is in a public school, they do not keep track of their child's progress.

Has there ever been a study regarding parent involvement in the child's school activities? It would be interesting to see what the results showed.
Lisa

Hacienda Heights, CA

#7 Apr 11, 2010
NCLB is the second stupidest piece of Legislation to come from Wash. DC. The Patriot Act still has it beat. NCLB sounds good on paper but loses something in the translation. No matter how much you prepare, students are evaluated by one test on one day. Many kids just fill in answers randomly and don't care. It doesn't show growth.A child may be reading below grade level, make wonderful growth but still appear way below level. Two tests should be given and the level of improvement noted. CA is not required to test Second Graders, yet continues to waste 6 million a year during these very tough economic times. If I had a small child I would request in writing that my child not take the test.This is all that is necessary
Candace

Rancho Cucamonga, CA

#8 Apr 11, 2010
If we privatize as Felipe says, I agree as long as those private school and home-school teachers complete and pass all the requirements that public school teachers do. Otherwise, anybody could open their doors as a "school" and simply take the money with no training in education. NCLB required that all public school teachers prove they are "highly qualified" and back it up with documents proving so. It only makes sense that all teachers do it as well if we privatize.
A concerned citizen

San Diego, CA

#9 Apr 11, 2010
Many of the poor-performing schools take elective from students and have them double up on English and Math. If one is already hating Math and English, then they are going to hate it more when they have to double up on it.

I know at some schools they have a bootcamp within the school week. They take students out of the class (all classes) and have them prep for Math and English tests. They spend thousands of dollars prepping for the CAHSEE. They think that improving Math and English will by default improve Social Studies and Science. I have seen otherwise. Focussing on Social Studies and Science allows students to get the all the subjects. Look at El Centro if you want data.

Finally if science and social studies teachers are going to get paid based on test scores, then the time and money better be spent so that we have equal access to the funds, the time, and to the students.
Concerned Parent

Claremont, CA

#10 Apr 11, 2010
I think that even MORE than 84% of the teacers are disappointed in NCLB, but teachers polled are also fearing for their jobs these days and likely wanted to say the "right" thing. I would offer that at least 84% of parents (who are paying attention) are also disappointed by NCLB. How is it that my grade schooler is doing way more than I was when I was that age, yet recent high school graduates working at Target can not even string a sentence together? The "standards" are not developmentally appropriate. I don't, for instance, know how socially and economically disadvantaged children are NOT going to fall by the wayside. We, as parents with post graduate degrees, struggle to keep our child prepared, and resent that our child doesn't have the carefree elementary school years that we did. There will surely be a negative impact from this alone.

As for Obama's NCLB "on steriods," I geuss it's easy for him to further screw up the schools when he opts out by sending his own girls to a private Quaker school. As a progressive democrat, I find him such a disappointment.

Concerned Parent
Reality Based

Redlands, CA

#11 Apr 11, 2010
NCLB did sound good on paper. It was passed by Congress in a rare bipartisan display of support because of the way it was framed. Who could vote for children being left behind? The politics of the situation and the emotions behind it, however, overshadow the fact that it was a fundamentally flawed piece of legislation. Regardless of what some may think, it has virtually no value.

Immediately after passage, school districts began looking for ways to make the necessary cut-off scores to stay out of trouble. They didn't immediately focus on improving education. They immediately focused on generating higher test scores.

These efforts came in the form of narrowing instruction to the tested subject matter; greater efforts to reduce "significant populations" so that their scores wouldn't count as a subgroup in the scoring of schools; scheduling secondary students into classes that were less challenging with the thought students would score better if they were tested in easier subjects; requiring students to take more years of a subject than required because untested kids count against the school's score; and, a score of other reforms that had nothing to do with improving education but had the potential to lift scores.

The goal distortion that occurred as a result of this law has actually reduced the quality of education our kids receive. The scores are going up as schools game the system, but kids are suffering. It will always be this way as long as punitive measures are used in an attempt to induce reform. If a person is threatened with punishment, they'll do whatever it takes to avoid it.

NCLB and the reforms being introduced by Obama need to be scrapped. They'll never work.
Mixed Interests

Los Angeles, CA

#12 Apr 11, 2010
This is a no-brainer.
Kim

Hacienda Heights, CA

#13 Apr 11, 2010
I see more and more cheating. Scores not up enough?; teachers aren't doing their jobs;Scores up too much, somebody's changing the answers. It's a no win situation.
Kim

Hacienda Heights, CA

#14 Apr 11, 2010
I agree with Lisa. Request that your child be excused form the test.
Fred

Upland, CA

#15 Apr 11, 2010
How much money does all this cost the taxpayer?
gilman

Duarte, CA

#16 Apr 11, 2010
Lisa wrote:
No matter how much you prepare, students are evaluated by one test on one day. Many kids just fill in answers randomly and don't care. It doesn't show growth.A child may be reading below grade level, make wonderful growth but still appear way below level.
"evaluated by one test"...oh you mean like our higher educational institutions evaluate who will, and who will not, be allowed to attend? There has to be some form of accountability for both teachers and students.....testing seems to make sense.

"make wonderful growth" but they are still way below grade level makes little sense.
gilman

Duarte, CA

#17 Apr 11, 2010
Bill wrote:
What private school is going to take the gangbangers, the special ed students, the bad behaving students, and the low attending students? What private school is going to put up with their parents? Drug addicts, prison felons, and other welfare / entitlement lowlifes are not very supportive when it comes to education. Schools are failing because families are failing.
Pretty accurate statements. To go a step further, children which come from a stable home life are forced into classes with the children outlined above...the result is what we have now. Teachers spending their time with the problem children while the others receive little attention?
Berdoo

Yucaipa, CA

#18 Apr 11, 2010
California school will continue to be total failures as long as they cater the lowest common denominator. And, this will not be solved until we rid our schools of non-english speaking illegals or children of illegals. These non-english speakers are drain. Go back to Mexico please, we don't want you. The only thing they are good for is buying our used up gas SUV's. Ever notice how the Mexicans are all driving old model SUV's. I guess they need something to haul around the 15 or so people who live in there rented house.
Think about it

San Bernardino, CA

#19 Apr 11, 2010
I was one of those teachers interviewed for the study. I do find that the NCLB did make schools, teachers and students more accountable for learning specific standards! That was a good thing! The problem was and still is that the law never held the parents accountable! And the parents are the key to success! An example- Phonemic Awareness is when a child starts to see a correlation between letters and meaning. It is the beginning step to any child learning how to read. Studies show that it can take an average of a million words read to a child before the child realizes this correlation. So the good mom's and dad's out there that read to their children come to school in Kindergarten and ready to read. But that is the exception in a poor, blighted community. It can take a child YEARS of school to get that time in- and still never catch up! This difference in parent quality makes some schools look like super stars and others terrible. That was just ONE example where lack of parent accountability matters. Mix in lack of support, coming to school hungry and tired, single parent households etc... Bottom line- until there is a parent component to the NCLB, it will stay an unfair system that in the end Kids are still left behind..... by their parents!
Kim

Hacienda Heights, CA

#20 Apr 11, 2010
Dear Gilman, Three years ago I had a child walk into my class that could not identify letters of the alphabet. By year'send he could read at a first grade level. That is almost 2 full yr's growth. Yet according to grade level standards , he was still way below. This makes lots of sense to ane in the teahing field!

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