I've never met a dumb home-schooled kid

There are 20 comments on the Las Cruces Sun-News story from Apr 9, 2011, titled I've never met a dumb home-schooled kid. In it, Las Cruces Sun-News reports that:

Just my luck, I missed out on two of the greatest concepts in education: the one-room schoolhouse and home schooling.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Las Cruces Sun-News.

weirdos

Albuquerque, NM

#21 Apr 11, 2011
One thing you can count on by homeschooling your kid is that he will be a 40 year old virgin, but that's probably what all you weirdos want for your weirdo kids. I used to live across the street from one of these weirdo families growing up. They had one little 14" TV in their weirdo house and it was black and white, in the 90's. When the son turned 18 he moved to Albuquerque just to get away from his weirdo family. Same thing with his younger sis when she became of age.
KokopelliMOM

Albuquerque, NM

#22 Apr 11, 2011
Esther Zertuche wrote:
I want to home school my kids to if somebody can guide me please this is my e- mail address zfajardo@ nmsu.edu thank you.
http://www.hslda.org/laws/analysis/New_Mexico...

“Heroes aren't born”

Since: Apr 08

They are made!

#24 Apr 11, 2011
KokopelliMOM wrote:
Nice, now the true crazies come out.
Yet another benefit to home schooling. My kids learn to treat others with kindness and respect. HS'ing isn't for everyone, but don't assume that it doesn't work for some others. My children participate in activities with other kids outside of the home. They are more outgoing now than they were when they were in PS. I am complimented all the time on how well mannered and mature my kids are. You come across lazy parents on both sides, that has nothing to do with whether HS'ing vs. PS'ing work.
Lazy parenting has everything to do with education, period. If you have supportive parents, or parent depending upon the family situation, it can make all the difference in the child's education. Being supportive and "not lazy" you were able to recognize that your children were not being educated properly and were willing and able to take them out of school and teach them at home. It made the difference in your child's life. Each experience is different depending upon how supportive and involved the parent is. If you combine a lazy parent with a homeschooled child you most certainly will have a disaster. The child will not be taught what is needed, nor will they gain the social skills they need and it will be a mess. I have seen that with our neighbor up the street. Bragging about how she was able to give her kid "all the handouts and finished the whole school day in 2 hours." What?! They are not involved in any extra activities and I believe they are being set up for failure. PS is the same way. Lazy parents who do not make any effort to be involved in a child's education will not recognize when their child is being mistreated or not learning things pertinent to them becoming a successful adult. Active parenting can make all the difference, in either case and is the difference between a success story and sad story. HS worked for you and that's fantastic, but it was because of your involvement.

“Heroes aren't born”

Since: Apr 08

They are made!

#25 Apr 11, 2011
SSayles wrote:
Nice, Lee! We didn't miss out on social skills either. When my folks took my sister and I out of public schools in 1985, our friends and family argued that we wouldn't receive the socialization needed to make our way in the world.
The problem was that we were already socialized to speak, think, and act like little adults, so we never really fit in with our peers in public school. Instead, we became more active in 4-H, our church youth group and our horse associations and left the poor kids who had to "stay in school" far behind.
Today, my sis and I both have masters degrees. Being home schooled didn't make us value learning any less--we were home schooled because we were part of a family that valued learning over the convenience of the paid babysitter. It was hard work, on top of everything else they had to do, but my parents made the commitment and stuck to it until we were both in college.
By the way--we were both valedictorian of our respective classes!(We joked about it, but in case another reader should think it a laughing matter, we both won academic scholarships.)
And this just furthers the point, HS can definitely be a HUGE benefit to students and provides a wonderful one on one learning environment without the ridiculous standardized tests. You were taught to think versus memorize, which is exactly what we need to promote in learning. This worked because your parents were committed and active in your lives. Not to mention they were willing to take on the hard work of extra activities and it all worked. If a parent is not committed to doing all of this, HS is a bad idea because that child risks not getting any education.

“Heroes aren't born”

Since: Apr 08

They are made!

#26 Apr 11, 2011
weirdos wrote:
<quoted text> If this is all true, your 2 in a million. Your forgot to tell the part where you and your sister were forced to be sex slaves for your weirdo parents and ended up marrying each other and having a cyclopse incest baby! And of course you guys were in 4H, and a weirdo morman youth group,(your rednecks right).hahahahahahaha!
And I wonder were it is that you are posting this from? Your basement at mom and dad's house? There is nothing wrong with HS kids, as long as they have the support they need, they will have a FAR better education than you could ever hope for, and in turn become far more successful. They are not taught to tests, they are taught to THINK. Something you clearly weren't in your excellent PS education. Your example above is not what ALL HS kids experience, open your eyes and stop slamming something you don't understand or care to even think about. Your public education is shinning through.
forget it

Albuquerque, NM

#27 Apr 11, 2011
Snap wrote:
I've never met an uninformed columnist. You should go into the schools and see what is being taught before you write a piece like this. Once the parents and students are made accountable,then things will change.
As long as there is a teachers union, the teachers will never be held accountable.
Among You Soon

United States

#28 Apr 11, 2011
It's common nolwedge that the Dems and their corrupt unions have destroyed the public school system in this country..........so home schooling is the best alternative left to us!!
LCisDumb

Las Cruces, NM

#29 Apr 11, 2011
Home schooling is great....if the parent(s) are teachers or the kid gets tutored( by a qualified instructor) and has to prove he or she knows the material. They have to be able to have reading comprehension.(follow directions) and they need math with a minimum of geometry and pre-algebra. I may be wrong but unless they are 'gifted' with high intelligence and a curiosity for what will later be engineering or computers...the kid will get weeded out first year in college if he goes for anything that requires a working knowledge of algrebra.
Of course.. they will be ok going for the liberal arts.(hehe sorry couldnt resist)

but in this day and age of push a button and get the answer...meh... the kids just keep getting dumber and dumber schooled or otherwise.

and we wonder why all the professional jobs go to Asian and Indian young adults. Because they WANT them enough to take advantage of education. We are squandering our country.
perfect example of HS

Albuquerque, NM

#30 Apr 11, 2011
IggyKat wrote:
<quoted text>
And I wonder were it is that you are posting this from? Your basement at mom and dad's house? There is nothing wrong with HS kids, as long as they have the support they need, they will have a FAR better education than you could ever hope for, and in turn become far more successful. They are not taught to tests, they are taught to THINK. Something you clearly weren't in your excellent PS education. Your example above is not what ALL HS kids experience, open your eyes and stop slamming something you don't understand or care to even think about. Your public education is shinning through.
In the public school system we spell correctly. "were" is where and "shinning" is shining in the public school system. You better get back to "werk" now smart home schooler.

“Irony, metaphor, film @ eleven”

Since: Feb 08

Old Mesilla/New Las Cruces

#31 Apr 11, 2011
KokopelliMOM wrote:
I also have to say this in defense of PS teachers. There are good teachers and bad teachers, and teachers are limited by the budget of the schools and districts they are in. I came across a small handful of good teachers, but even contact with one or two bad teachers is enough to rot a child's educational experience. I wasn't willing to take the gamble anymore.
Budget.....
the LAS CRUCES PUBLIC SCHOOLS SPEND OVER $13,000 ON EACH and every
child enrolled this year. Likely will be as much next year.

I really don't believe that money is the problem. I don't believe that it is too little to invest, nor too much.
I don't believe the buildings are inherit-ably unsafe or too small. I don't believe that the gymnasium, band-rooms, or other large group facilities are poorly equipped or other common areas are lacking in lighting, ventilation, restroom or staff facilities.

Every classroom is heated, cooled, and well lit. Computers, cellphones, and other
personal communications electronics proliferate the halls and classrooms of any campus.

I don't believe the school transportation factors are inadequate or are roundly unsafe.

Teachers and kids who drive are driving pretty nice and mostly current model autos, and bikes. Not hot-rods and bucket of bolts heaps like their great and grand parents of the past. Most do not walk or ride bicycles. They come on 4 or more wheels.

The grass and the trees are trimmed and maintained as nice as any. There are police and defended security everywhere you look. The State and US flags are hung with care.

I guess that boils it down to the quality of the educators or the quality of
the students. It's not the land, it's the man.

Pick one and fix it. But pick ONE. I guess both of them is to much to handle.

A 60% GRADUATION RATE ISN'T GETTING ANYONE'S MONEY'S WORTH, or so it appears.
One in three will drop-out is pretty piss poor performance, even during the Obama and Richardson wonder years. And Johnny and Mary still can't read.

The new high school, is opening soon. One hundred and ten million ($110,000,000) is a lot of money. An unbelievable sum of money for one school.

I think they have run out of excuses and this is where the mothers' eats their young.

Myloneneuron

Albuquerque, NM

#32 Apr 11, 2011
It is interesting that so many home-schoolers are petitioning superintendents to allow home-schooled kids to participate in band, choir, orchestra, football, volleyball, basketball, FFA, honor society, etc. I guess the schools aren't so bad that their children can't participate and mingle with other kids in those dins of iniquity. However, you can teach your child that the earth is 10,000 years old and that all life sprang from the Garden. You can censor out all literature which doesnt coincide exactly with your belief system. You can teach your religious beliefs 24-7 (except when the kid is at band). There certainly is a reason for home-schooling, and its not about the graduation rate.
Judas

Las Cruces, NM

#33 Apr 11, 2011
A child of smart, caring, educated parents will be able to do well in most settings. Unfortunately, in Las Cruces, the majority of parents are undereducated, lackadaisical, and unconvinced of the value of an education. Garbage in, garbage out.
Action

Las Cruces, NM

#34 Apr 11, 2011
A consideration is that with the dropout rate, and low test scores, if home schooling, while lacking in social skills, is all that bad of an alternative. Do you really want to encourage social skills associated with the actual numbers. It is possible to enroll home schooled kids in sports, dance classes and other outside social activities and still teach values at home.
THX 1138

Las Cruces, NM

#35 Apr 11, 2011
I've never met a dumb home-schooled kid either, but I have met several socially stunted adults who had been home-schooled.
THX 1138

Las Cruces, NM

#36 Apr 11, 2011
Among You Soon wrote:
It's common nolwedge that the Dems and their corrupt unions have destroyed the public school system in this country..........so home schooling is the best alternative left to us!!
Yes, please keep your kids home. If they're anything like you, they will taint the other kids and bring down their overall test scores.
Desertdawg

AOL

#37 Apr 11, 2011
IggyKat wrote:
In this instance, either side has a case. There are both several positives and negatives on either side and as a parent it is difficult to know what to do. The first factor in deciding should be whether or not the parent truly has the skills and the time to effectively teach their child. Being honest about whether or not they are really helping their child. I have two children in public school and one getting ready to enter. I have thought about taking them out several times, but I want them to be able to enjoy sports and to have the experience of knowing how to handle social situations. I have opted to offer extra support at home. I have them play educational games and have online sites where they can go to practice. I also feel the area that our schools are most lacking is in history and georgraphy, so we discuss and learn about those things together at home. I simply hung up a world map on the wall in my room and we all started studying, picking a country, seeing where it is at and looking it up to learn a little history. Easy and interesting. The schools aren't great, but if the parent doesn't have the time to fully home school, just being a good support system can go a long way.
Interesting how one of the most sensible and informed posts in this thread (above) gets so many bad marks in Judge It. Just goes to show how utterly stupid those ridiculous icons are.
IggyKat has the right idea....educational responsibility, support and involvement at home, particularly in areas where schools are weak like history and geography. This will be even more crucial as schools are judged by test scores, as the schools will have every reason to "teach for the test" and not provide a well-rounded and diverse education.
A number of home school situations I'm personally aquainted with have more to do with teaching Jesus than teaching science, math and reading. The kids tend to be insular, narrow and somewhat ignorant of the larger world, though some have been very successful. Depends a lot, probably too much, on the individual parents.
Nice job, IggyKat!

“Heroes aren't born”

Since: Apr 08

They are made!

#38 Apr 11, 2011
perfect example of HS wrote:
<quoted text> In the public school system we spell correctly. "were" is where and "shinning" is shining in the public school system. You better get back to "werk" now smart home schooler.
I graduated from a public school high school. I type faster than I think and really could give a crap about accidentally typing in a few errors.
Amy

Albuquerque, NM

#39 Apr 11, 2011
I home-school. I have proper grades, and my social skills are fine. However I must say, not all social skills are as black and white as 'home-schooled or not home-schooled'. My brother and I were brought up the same exact way, and home-schooled the same exact way, and I have plenty of friends and am more of a social butterfly. My brother however, is more quiet and has select friends; it's also all about personality. Also, just because someones more shy doesn't mean they have awful social skills and no friends.
As for if home-schooling is for everyone,it's probably not. If the parent can't keep up with it, then it's just not worth it. I'd rather see someone that admits they couldn't keep up with it, or don't have the time, rather than assume they do and pull their kid out of school and then not be able to properly educate them.*Shrug*
All the comments are very interesting to read though, it's nice to get some insight from different people and their different opinions.

“Heroes aren't born”

Since: Apr 08

They are made!

#40 Apr 11, 2011
stopTAGGING ourWALLS wrote:
<quoted text>
Budget.....
the LAS CRUCES PUBLIC SCHOOLS SPEND OVER $13,000 ON EACH and every
child enrolled this year. Likely will be as much next year.
I really don't believe that money is the problem. I don't believe that it is too .......... is opening soon. One hundred and ten million ($110,000,000) is a lot of money. An unbelievable sum of money for one school.
I think they have run out of excuses and this is where the mothers' eats their young.
It is the legislation. The No Child Left Behind Act, while good intentioned, has created a mess. Most teachers are teaching to the test and just trying to get the scores they need to keep their jobs. Teachers should be held accountable, but not for teaching a child how to memorize facts and guess true or false or fill in the bubble. There are three teachers in my family in different areas of New Mexico and they are all saying the same thing, No Child Left Behind has screwed up our system pretty badly. We need to teach the basics, reading and math, but we also need to teach critical thinking skills, history, social studies, and geography. Because reading and math are so high up on the NMSBA scale, that is all that is taught and the other stuff only comes in if they have enough time left over. It is completely unbalanced. Again, strong parental involvement is always the key to any child's education, no matter where that might be.
ummmmmm

Las Cruces, NM

#41 Apr 11, 2011
I take a considerable amount of offense to this article. My husband and I both passed through the public school system and have both now have our MBA's. My husband was involved in sports while I was involved in National Honor Society and several other academic groups and we BOTH worked throughout high school. I certaintly don't feel that our parents or "the system" has failed either of us. Based on this article, I am supposed to believe that because we both work full time in professional fields OTHER than teaching our own children, we are failing them?!?!

The success of either home OR public schooled children has little to nothing to do with the classroom setting and everything to do with the child and their parents. As a parent, I have taught my daughter (9 years old) from a very young age that SHE is responsible for her decisions. SHE is responsible for completing her own homework, and she understands the consequences of NOT completing it. Does this mean that I do not support her or offer assistance when needed? Absolutely not. It does however mean that whether the homework was assigned by her public school teacher or myself, she is held accountable for the things she is supposed to accomplish.

I am not in any way saying the public school system is perfect (or even preferred), but I am so sick and tired of people who say that homeschooling is the only way to ensure that your child "won't be dumb"...

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