Applicants outnumber school vouchers

Applicants outnumber school vouchers

There are 31 comments on the DispatchPolitics story from Apr 19, 2011, titled Applicants outnumber school vouchers. In it, DispatchPolitics reports that:

For the second year in a row, applicants to Ohio's private-school voucher program have exceeded the number of available vouchers.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at DispatchPolitics.

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Team Al

Marion, OH

#22 Apr 19, 2011
While people are so quick to declare the ineffectiveness of the public school system and declare... "Let's do away with these terrible schools and these bad teachers!" Let's share a number that is quite interesting, shall we?

21% of charter schools have been deemed "effective" by the State Dept. of Ed.
73% of public schools have been deemed "effective"

So... what is the governor's solution? Take money away from the system that has over 7 out of 10 schools effective, and give it to the system that has 2 out of 10 schools effective. Does anyone wonder why this would be his solution? Well, his friends run a "for-profit" charter school system. He is making $560 million dollars of taxpayer money available to them. Bless his heart. Isn't it nice to have friends???
not the enemy

Columbus, OH

#23 Apr 19, 2011
Vicki, yes I have heard of all these districts you mention. But the point is not per student expenditure it is the value placed on education. The humanistic component. While the districts you cited have outstanding results on test scores what do you quantify as a "complete education"? Would that include the myriad of sports and extra-curriculars offered by affluent districts or just the basic 3 R's?
The other point I was trying to make is that the while the affluent districts have many students moving to post secondary education that is not entirely true of the poor counties in Ohio where the family views a high school diploma as adequate for the local workforce. Again this is based upon the socio-economics of the various demograpics in Ohio (as in any state for that matter).
And you are correct in stating throwing money at school districts is not always the answer. But inner city vs. rural vs. suburban comparisions are entirely inaccurate as they do not take into context the population make up and value placed on education. The test scores do not truly represent who one is teaching to.
After teaching in both inner city schools and rural districts I find that the rural students are much more adept at learning while many of the students I served in the inner city used the school as as a social gathering place rather than for education. This is the place they had to go rather than wanted. Th history of my teaching career in Ohio reads like a crime novella rather than a biography.
Now for the big question, how does one make one desire education? Even the most effective teacher cannot make a student learn, they have to want it. And how does this happen when you may spend an hour per day with a given student? It must be intrinsic and personal choice and no school district or altruistic legislator can supply that.
Vicki Kerman

Mansfield, OH

#24 Apr 19, 2011
Not the Enemy ... thank you for your thoughtful post!

With respect to comparing rural/sububurban/urban schools, look at ODE's "Similar Districts" methodology which compares schools with their "peers." http://www.ode.state.oh.us ... search for "Similar Districts."

Have you read the "Coleman Report" (otherwise known as the "Equality of Educational Opportunity" study ... money/funding has little impact on the quality of education received by students. It wasconducted as a result of the Civil Rights Act of 1968. Highly recommend it (google it). Also recommend "Shaking up the Schoolhouse" by Schlechty, "An Elusive Science: The Troubling History of Education Research" by Lagemann, and "Ghosts from the Nursery" by Karr-Morse and Wiley. The latter is not necessarily education-related, but describes what's going on in our society re. kids' behaviors.
Damn if you do

Columbus, OH

#25 Apr 19, 2011
Your damn if you do and damn if you don't. Working class America cannot get a break, I would love to send my kids to private schools but I will not meet the low income guideline so my kids get to go to Columbus public and I get to pray for their safety every day. My neighborhood was once a pretty deceit working class area now it is getto and my kids home school would be South. I do not think so.
not the enemy

Columbus, OH

#26 Apr 19, 2011
Vicki Kerman wrote:
Not the Enemy ... thank you for your thoughtful post!
With respect to comparing rural/sububurban/urban schools, look at ODE's "Similar Districts" methodology which compares schools with their "peers." http://www.ode.state.oh.us ... search for "Similar Districts."
Have you read the "Coleman Report" (otherwise known as the "Equality of Educational Opportunity" study ... money/funding has little impact on the quality of education received by students. It wasconducted as a result of the Civil Rights Act of 1968. Highly recommend it (google it). Also recommend "Shaking up the Schoolhouse" by Schlechty, "An Elusive Science: The Troubling History of Education Research" by Lagemann, and "Ghosts from the Nursery" by Karr-Morse and Wiley. The latter is not necessarily education-related, but describes what's going on in our society re. kids' behaviors.
Vicki, thanks for the reading recommendations! I read an excerpt of the Coleman Report years ago I need to dust it off and read it again. Pulled out my copy of "A Nation at Risk" recently. Haven't read any of the others but my main focus in education is career and technical so my readings tend to favor those areas. Again it was insightful to discuss our educational woes (and pluses) with one who seems to possess a great deal of knowledge about the subject. Immensely more pleasurable than some of the thoughtless comments we see on these blogs.
Vicki Kerman

Mansfield, OH

#27 Apr 19, 2011
Not the enemy ... good!
Since your focus is on career/technical, I think far too little emphasis is placed on trade schools ... not everyone is meant to be an investment banker, professor, or management-type and therefore doesn't need a (sometimes esoteric) college degree (with its attendant cost). In many cases, young adults would be far better served learning trades -- plumbing, engine repair, electrical, carpentry, farming, raising livestock -- than calculus, english literature, or comparative religion. The way this country is going, I think it's in everyone's best interest to learn how to do "real stuff" which will help them be confident and independent, enable them to make a living by having skills they can use to help members of their community, and in the worst case, just plain survive.
It's also a matter of attitude. Nothing like a college grad with (in some case hundreds of thousands of) school debt searching for the "right" job when all he/she can find is working for minimum wage at McD's but feels entitled to more. As a country, we need to face up to the fact that our manufacturing base has been severely eroded, that our government continues to borrow and spend like drunken sailors, and that we're all going to have to make concessions.
Just my 2 cents.
Renee

Westerville, OH

#28 Apr 19, 2011
Everyone that wants a voucher should get one, forget the low income guidelines. Its for the Kids....
Renee

Westerville, OH

#29 Apr 19, 2011
The cost per pupil in Ohio is $10,173. Vouchers should be increased from $5000 to at least $7500 per pupil to create a more competetive teaching environment at the institution where the voucher is used. Time for Ohioans to quit funding a bloated educational system that has evolved into a bottomless money pit.
LadyTara8

Mount Vernon, OH

#30 Apr 20, 2011
Our new governor has done everything right so far. God bless him. l hope he can increase the number of vouchers for those who do not want to attend the disaster that is CCS and cannnot afford tuition at other schools.
LadyTara8

Mount Vernon, OH

#31 Apr 20, 2011
After 30 years in the classroom I saw a lot of wonderful teachers in public schools. However the unions ruined the public schools. No one can be fired without the district having to spend time and money and having endless hearings with the union rep first. Look at the teacher that burned a cross in a student's arm and also taught creationism. It cost the district at least a million to get rid of him. That is why districts move ineffective and more dangerous teachers around. You can't run a business or a school district when you can't fire the people who are not doing their jobs. Furthermore the administration is so politically correct it interferes with wise decisions in personnel and placement.
Morbitzer

Hilliard, OH

#32 Apr 21, 2011
So if I don't get a voucher we pay for our kids to go to a good school and someone else's. Not fair to me at all.

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