Few students give up state school vou...

Few students give up state school vouchers

There are 22 comments on the DispatchPolitics story from Mar 7, 2010, titled Few students give up state school vouchers. In it, DispatchPolitics reports that:

Romaniun Speed, left, and Meloni Boone are students at Columbus Adventist Academy.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at DispatchPolitics.

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Amy

Hilliard, OH

#1 Mar 7, 2010
I don't know about any other schools, but when i transferred from my private school I had attended for 9 years to a public high school I was way ahead of the class. Just basic studying tools allowed me to perform better then my peers and retain things faster. If I have children in the future, private school is something I will definitely be looking into.
Athiest

Dublin, OH

#2 Mar 7, 2010
Great, I have to pay for religious "education".
John Galt

Columbus, OH

#3 Mar 7, 2010
Anyone surprised that union schools don't carry a candle to private schools in the inner city?
rebel

Columbus, OH

#4 Mar 7, 2010
Vouchers are unconstitutional(private religious schools) and should be eliminated all together.
Sean Hannity

Columbus, OH

#5 Mar 7, 2010
Great...more people on the public dole. Cancel all voucher programs. Use this money to cut taxes to allow people to spend on money on what they want.

If we allow these programs to exist, the Marxist commies have won.
NWGuy

Seattle, WA

#6 Mar 7, 2010
Amy wrote:
I don't know about any other schools, but when i transferred from my private school I had attended for 9 years to a public high school I was way ahead of the class. Just basic studying tools allowed me to perform better then my peers and retain things faster. If I have children in the future, private school is something I will definitely be looking into.
This isn't surprising.

Private high schools select for the better students. They do it overtly by actually testing and interviewing candidates. They do it without even trying by charging tuition and requiring parent participation through the application process. Only parents motivated by education concerns select and pay for private school, and they actually care about the results they get for their money, meaning continued parental participation.

When public schools have the resources, they can do the same thing. Dallas, TX, Seattle, and other cities have public International Baccalaureate schools that get results equivalent to the many private such schools. Many cities have other exemplary public schools - I mention IB only because they can be so directly compared.

In Seattle, the best public schools are competitive academically with the best privates (as rated by college admissions professionals at US universities). And, yes, there are "others" even though funding is almost all controlled at the state level, the school boards are the same, and much of the administration is the same. In fact, more money (per student) is spent on the worse schools, because of the problems they have.

By FAR, the most cost effective way to get a great education for your kids in Seattle is to move to a location where you can be sure of your kids attending a good public school.
ramseyjames

Bellefontaine, OH

#7 Mar 7, 2010
about 11,600 students who attend one of 279 private schools at no cost... Oh yeah, at no cost to the student because they are being paid for by taxpayers. The private school is there to MAKE MONEY, period. I think it is great if some parents would like to send their children to a private school, but, if you do, PAY FOR IT YOURSELVES, NOT US TAXPAYERS!!! We don't owe you a penny if you decide to choose a private school!

Since: Feb 10

Hopkinsville, KY

#8 Mar 7, 2010
Good article but I was confused with two points. It was my understanding that it is far less expensive for taxpayers to have students attend private schools via vouchers. The private schools receive approximately $4,000-5,000 per year per student via the voucher program. The cost per pupil in the Columbus City School district is $13,674. If the quality of the education is comparable, vouchers appear to be a much less expensive way to educate the kids.

As for the statement, "I haven't seen any data yet that the private-school experience serves students any better.", I was somewhat surprised. While there are certainly a large number of great public high schools, my research shows that on a percentage basis, private schools makeup a much higher percentage of the best performing high schools on the Ohio Graduation Test.

For more information, access:

http://www.gerberanalytics.com/ogt.html

and look at the Top Academic Ohio High Schools document.
Lfod

Defiance, OH

#9 Mar 7, 2010
CPS would be out of bussness if true choice was open to all Columbus students. Look at the board members, past and present , whose kids DID NOT attend CPS. There is a reason.
NWGuy

Seattle, WA

#10 Mar 7, 2010
GAnalytics wrote:
Good article but I was confused with two points. It was my understanding that it is far less expensive for taxpayers to have students attend private schools via vouchers. The private schools receive approximately $4,000-5,000 per year per student via the voucher program. The cost per pupil in the Columbus City School district is $13,674. If the quality of the education is comparable, vouchers appear to be a much less expensive way to educate the kids.
As for the statement, "I haven't seen any data yet that the private-school experience serves students any better.", I was somewhat surprised. While there are certainly a large number of great public high schools, my research shows that on a percentage basis, private schools makeup a much higher percentage of the best performing high schools on the Ohio Graduation Test.
For more information, access:
http://www.gerberanalytics.com/ogt.html
and look at the Top Academic Ohio High Schools document.
Somebody has to make up the other $10K per kid. Usually, that is the parents.

In Seattle, the numbers for a good private high school (which is more expensive than K-9) is closer to $20K. So, the difference would be more like $15K per kid per year.

Let's say you have a couple kids. That means, with a $5K voucher for each, you as a parent would need to make up the other $30K per year. In other words, it is a program for the rich.

The privates in Seattle are full. They have thousands of students who have left, so why start giving them hundreds of thousands (or millions?) of dollars per year to continue to do what they're already doing?

Besides, their loss takes good, interested parents along with roll model students away from public education, leaving public education weaker. After all, the private high schools simply don't accept average students. Let's think about it before we start paying for that result.

Since: Feb 10

Hopkinsville, KY

#11 Mar 7, 2010
NWGuy wrote:
<quoted text>
Somebody has to make up the other $10K per kid. Usually, that is the parents.
In Seattle, the numbers for a good private high school (which is more expensive than K-9) is closer to $20K. So, the difference would be more like $15K per kid per year.
Let's say you have a couple kids. That means, with a $5K voucher for each, you as a parent would need to make up the other $30K per year. In other words, it is a program for the rich.
The privates in Seattle are full. They have thousands of students who have left, so why start giving them hundreds of thousands (or millions?) of dollars per year to continue to do what they're already doing?
Besides, their loss takes good, interested parents along with roll model students away from public education, leaving public education weaker. After all, the private high schools simply don't accept average students. Let's think about it before we start paying for that result.
Thanks for the reply. I don't think that's the case here in Ohio. In fact, some of the best private high schools in Ohio are less than $10K/year and even some of them offer financial assistance to those who cannot afford it.

I'm unsure of how it works in Seattle, Washington, but parents paying for private schools in Ohio pay the same amount in taxes as those who send their kids to public schools. If the state of Ohio had to pay for the education of all of the kids who currently attend private schools, then Ohio would be facing even bigger financial problems.(We are currently in awful financial shape.)

I'm agnostic when it comes to public, private, or charter. The kids who want a great education should have access to it -- in a cost effective manner.
NWGuy

Seattle, WA

#12 Mar 7, 2010
Interesting.

Here in Seattle there are roughly 40 private schools that cover at least grades 10,11, and 12.

If they average 100 high school students total per high school and vouchers are $5K each,(that is, if there are 4,000 private high school students in the area) that would require an additional $20M budget item in order to cover what's going on right now in this one metro area. Most high schools are well over 100 students, so I think this is conservative.

And, of course, that bill would only cover high school. Private middle school tuition is about the same as high school tuition.

I would add that something dramatic would need to happen to cause more private schools to be built here. I don't know what's going on right now, because my kids graduated, but in the recent past, every reasonable private school had long wait lists, yet no new schools have been built. Given capitalism, I'd say private school would have to get more expensive in order to encourage additional schools to be built. As it is, I believe every single private high school is non-profit, by the way.
Concerned Parent

Lancaster, OH

#13 Mar 7, 2010
I would be very surprised to hear the head of a teachers union say anything positive about private schools. It really serves no purpose to ask the unions' opinion, since their purpose is the protection of their membership not the eduction of our children.
Most parents are taxpapers and they should be allowed to use their taxmoney to educate my children as they see fit. Why should children be locked into a system which admittedly has failed and continues to fail. It defies logic to continue sending your children to schools which are subpar.
Parents Choose - Kids Win

United States

#14 Mar 8, 2010
NWGuy wrote:
"Somebody has to make up the other $10K per kid. Usually, that is the parents."
Actually, the way I understand it, the EdChoice voucher is generally limited to neighborhoods where the parents are low and middle income families. According to ODE the program doesn't allow schools to charge low-income parents more than the voucher amount.
kwaljalein-Marys ville

Columbus, OH

#15 Mar 8, 2010
Privatization of the school system has upset the unions. Now the union representatives might offer more at the negotiation table with school boards besides a Cuban cigar. How about a a longer school year then the present160 days a year and a eight hour day for the same pay? Where else can you retire after 15 years of service working only 24 hours a week and seven months out of the year, only in the public education system.
Athiest

Dublin, OH

#16 Mar 10, 2010
John Galt wrote:
Anyone surprised that union schools don't carry a candle to private schools in the inner city?
They can kick out trouble makers and kids who don't want to be there.
rebel

Columbus, OH

#17 Mar 10, 2010
Lfod wrote:
CPS would be out of bussness if true choice was open to all Columbus students. Look at the board members, past and present , whose kids DID NOT attend CPS. There is a reason.
Upper class will ALWAYS be able to get what they want. Parents/citizens should go to the board meetings and confront them. Ask them what their motivation is for improving public schools if they don't send their kids there.
NWGuy

Seattle, WA

#18 Mar 10, 2010
Parents Choose - Kids Win wrote:
NWGuy wrote:
"Somebody has to make up the other $10K per kid. Usually, that is the parents."
Actually, the way I understand it, the EdChoice voucher is generally limited to neighborhoods where the parents are low and middle income families. According to ODE the program doesn't allow schools to charge low-income parents more than the voucher amount.
I'm not so sure I understand this one.

Are you saying that the state requires private schools to make up any difference between the vouchers and the cost of education by charging non-voucher parents higher tuition?

A common price point for private high school tuition here in Seattle is $20K. If the voucher is $5K, that would leave the school being required to make up the $15K per student difference by charging other parents, which would be a huge deal if any significant number of low-income kids were admitted.

How does this work? It would seem schools would have to have serious limits on how many low-income kids they accept, being more like a small state contribution to the school financial aid program. That is, it doesn't sound like a general solution for low-income parents.

I do agree with limiting vouchers to low income parents. Paying tens of millions of dollars to the parents who are already sending their kids to private school is a huge expense that nets not one single better educated child.
Pro EdChoice Parent

Springfield, OH

#19 Mar 25, 2010
What is Ms. Taylor talking about? Obviously, she hasn't done her own homework. In Springfield, Catholic Central School was just named one of the top 50 academic high schools in Ohio - and about a third of the students are Ohio EdChoice Scholarship recipients. In fact, almost 70% of these students made the A honor roll last quarter. What is so amazing is that the curriculum is much more difficult than what my child studied in public schools - yet, these teachers work very hard to assist students in "catching up" and learning the fundamentals to create a foundation for success. A big thank you to Senator Husted for continuing his efforts to garner support for a program that truly changes lives. Ms. Taylor most likely makes a significant salary, so keeping her job is top priority - which is realistic. What is not realistic is her belief that parents of children attending underperforming schools should be required to keep them there! That's just dumb...and dumber.
Sawa

United States

#20 Sep 3, 2010
GAnalytics wrote:
Good article but I was confused with two points. It was my understanding that it is far less expensive for taxpayers to have students attend private schools via vouchers. The private schools receive approximately $4,000-5,000 per year per student via the voucher program. The cost per pupil in the Columbus City School district is $13,674. If the quality of the education is comparable, vouchers appear to be a much less expensive way to educate the kids.
As for the statement, "I haven't seen any data yet that the private-school experience serves students any better.", I was somewhat surprised. While there are certainly a large number of great public high schools, my research shows that on a percentage basis, private schools makeup a much higher percentage of the best performing high schools on the Ohio Graduation Test.
For more information, access:
http://www.gerberanalytics.com/ogt.html
and look at the Top Academic Ohio High Schools document.
Oh thank goodness atleast someone on this thing has a brain!
I was getting kindof scare I got lost in a nut fctory.
Great article and I hope more kids get vouchers.
Public schools are just another government failure.

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