Could School Vouchers and Educational Choice Become National Norm?

Full story: findingDulcinea

A Georgia state senator wants to offer school vouchers to all students; in doing so, he has entered the larger national debate on choice in education.

Comments

Showing posts 1 - 20 of23
< prev page
|
Go to last page| Jump to page:
AnotherEduc8r

Washington, DC

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#1
May 13, 2009
 

Judged:

1

Senator Johnson's universal voucher bill never made it through the overwhelmingly Republican Georgia Senate. These initiatives have no practical chance once they're exposed for what they are - taxpayer-funded boondoggles for middle-class and wealthy families whose kids already attend private school. Why not save the legislative capital, not to mention millions of dollars, and actually focus on improving public schools???
mona

New York, NY

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#2
May 13, 2009
 
I'm all for improving public schools, but also like Johnson's idea of something that would apply to all students. There must be a middle ground...
NWGuy

Seattle, WA

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#3
May 13, 2009
 
mona wrote:
I'm all for improving public schools, but also like Johnson's idea of something that would apply to all students. There must be a middle ground...
Public school applies to all students. Any parent can home school. And, the folks with money have more options - as always.

So, I'm not sure what you mean by "middle ground".
Janet

Oregon City, OR

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#4
May 13, 2009
 
The more choice the better.
AnotherEduc8r

Washington, DC

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#5
May 14, 2009
 
Parents have choices. What these folks are promoting is forcing other tax payers to subsidize those private choices, but without granting those same taxpayers any say-so or oversight over how those dollars get spent. How would you feel about paying taxes to underwrite a faith you don't believe in, pay teachers who lack a bachelor's degree, buy textbooks that teach creationism instead of science, or worse - just go straight into the pocket of charlatans who open schools strictly to feed at the public trough?
NWGuy

Seattle, WA

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#6
May 14, 2009
 
AnotherEduc8r wrote:
Parents have choices. What these folks are promoting is forcing other tax payers to subsidize those private choices, but without granting those same taxpayers any say-so or oversight over how those dollars get spent. How would you feel about paying taxes to underwrite a faith you don't believe in, pay teachers who lack a bachelor's degree, buy textbooks that teach creationism instead of science, or worse - just go straight into the pocket of charlatans who open schools strictly to feed at the public trough?

Amen.

I'm also not very interested in selectively subsidizing the choices of those who are wealthy enough to choose alternatives for themselves, leaving those less wealthy without those choices.

That would be the effect of any voucher system where I live.

Since: Feb 07

Location hidden

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#8
Oct 11, 2010
 
It must be adopted, the voucher system has the potential for abuse. Let the lawmakkers write the laws.
Currently the NEA is a fiscal shell game controlled by a union that doesn't deliver on it's mission but buys Washington.

“Alius bardus latin laudo”

Since: Nov 08

Jackson St Forest, CA

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#9
Oct 11, 2010
 
AnotherEduc8r wrote:
Parents have choices. What these folks are promoting is forcing other tax payers to subsidize those private choices, but without granting those same taxpayers any say-so or oversight over how those dollars get spent. How would you feel about paying taxes to underwrite a faith you don't believe in, pay teachers who lack a bachelor's degree, buy textbooks that teach creationism instead of science, or worse - just go straight into the pocket of charlatans who open schools strictly to feed at the public trough?
For some one that is so pro-education you are awfully close-minded.

You obviously know nothing about private schools.

Let me ask you a question. Should we limit what unemployment checks can be spent on?
AnotherEduc8r

Washington, DC

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#10
Oct 11, 2010
 
Closed-minded about how I want my tax dollars invested or wasted? You betcha! Shouldn't everyone be?

And just in case you weren't aware, there are limits on how people can spend food stamps and Section 8 housing vouchers. You can't use Medicare for elective surgery, can you? Public dollars should come with public strings.

Since: Feb 07

Location hidden

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#11
Oct 12, 2010
 
The federal school system has not been a good investment, actually it is an expensive failure.
Voucher may save the students, the WH needs to save the teachers.

Since: Aug 10

Location hidden

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#12
Oct 12, 2010
 
All government schools should be shut down. Then the assets could be sold off and the money given back to the people it was stolen from. Education should be the responsibility of the parents.
Questioner

Washington, DC

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#13
Oct 12, 2010
 
So Bill, tell me what the United States looks like after your plan is implemented. I'm picturing a severely segmented society, in which the wealthy can afford to send their kids to great schools, the middle class get okay schools, and the poor are permanently trapped in the education equivalent of public housing and public health. The rich get richer and there is no opportunity to escape the class into which one was born. Corporations would make out like bandits, since they'd no longer bear any of the burden they now share for funding education, and would be guaranteed a steady supply of low-cost labor.

It's positively Dickensian, up until the disenfranchised masses rise up in rebellion. No thanks. We all have a personal self-interest in seeing that other people's children get a great education. Paying for it is the cost of living in a civilized society.

Since: Aug 10

Location hidden

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#14
Oct 12, 2010
 
Questioner wrote:
So Bill, tell me what the United States looks like after your plan is implemented. I'm picturing a severely segmented society, in which the wealthy can afford to send their kids to great schools, the middle class get okay schools, and the poor are permanently trapped in the education equivalent of public housing and public health. The rich get richer and there is no opportunity to escape the class into which one was born. Corporations would make out like bandits, since they'd no longer bear any of the burden they now share for funding education, and would be guaranteed a steady supply of low-cost labor.
It's positively Dickensian, up until the disenfranchised masses rise up in rebellion. No thanks. We all have a personal self-interest in seeing that other people's children get a great education. Paying for it is the cost of living in a civilized society.
Then start a charity and help pay for poor kids. Many poor children attend private schools now because of donations made by those who care.

Stop demanding that wealth be stolen from the productive to pay for your kid's government school "education".

A civilized society does not exist by theft and murder, something you support.
Questioner

Washington, DC

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#15
Oct 12, 2010
 
Murder? Really? Where do you get that from? You really lose credibility, and are unlikely to persuade anyone to join your point of view when you start lobbing around unsupported allegations of homicide.

And enough with the "taxes are theft" nonsense. It just makes you look silly.

Since: Aug 10

Location hidden

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#16
Oct 12, 2010
 
Questioner wrote:
Murder? Really? Where do you get that from? You really lose credibility, and are unlikely to persuade anyone to join your point of view when you start lobbing around unsupported allegations of homicide.
And enough with the "taxes are theft" nonsense. It just makes you look silly.
Are taxes voluntary? What happens when you don't pay?

In reality, it is you who is the "silly" one.

“Alius bardus latin laudo”

Since: Nov 08

Jackson St Forest, CA

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#17
Oct 12, 2010
 
AnotherEduc8r wrote:
Closed-minded about how I want my tax dollars invested or wasted? You betcha! Shouldn't everyone be?
And just in case you weren't aware, there are limits on how people can spend food stamps and Section 8 housing vouchers. You can't use Medicare for elective surgery, can you? Public dollars should come with public strings.
So wait. I am confused. You think that private schools are a waste?

62-67% of students in public schools continue on to college. 90-95% of students that attend private schools continue on to college. Minority students that attend private schools graduate and attend college at a much higher rate than in public schools.

The average cost of private schooling is $3500 per year. Tenney High School, one of the most elite private schools in the US, charges $13,000 per year, or you could spend $17,000 per year per student for a public school in New York where the graduation rate is 50-60%.

Hmm,$17,000 for a horrible education or $13,000 for a spectacular education? Who is wasting whose money here?

Hey, if you think that public schools more consistently produce better students than private schools, I have nothing more to say.

And as to your second point, I stated UNEMPLOYMENT. I made no reference to Medicare, section 8 , or any other program.

Since: Feb 07

Location hidden

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#18
Oct 13, 2010
 
First take back the Congress, then take back the education of our children.
Peralta de Peralta

Fort Huachuca, AZ

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#19
Nov 18, 2010
 
Tax-Credit Voucher Programs Before the Court
November 4, 2010 11:54
By Robert VerBruggen
http://www.nationalreview.com/phi-beta-cons/2...

Rebuttal

Re: Tax-Credit Voucher Programs
November 5, 2010 3:06 P.M. By David French
http://www.nationalreview.com/phi-beta-cons/2...
Questioner

Washington, DC

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#20
Nov 18, 2010
 
Get real thinks that private schools are better because they have higher rates of graduation and college attendance. Gee, ya think selective admissions have anything to do with that? What do you think happens to kids who flunk out of private school? The ones with behavior issues? Special needs? If I could select who gets into my classroom, and remove those who don't cut it, even I would look like a great teacher.

Your data on the average cost of private education are similarly flawed, as well as being at least a decade old.

Isn't it easy to be right when you cherry pick data and ignore inconvenient facts?

When demographically similar kids take the same test, the public school students outperform the privates.

So the question still is, why would you ask taxpayers to subsidize an education that is no better in quality, and deprives taxpayers of the oversight we deserve? This is the opposite of government transparency.

“Alius bardus latin laudo”

Since: Nov 08

Jackson St Forest, CA

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#21
Nov 18, 2010
 
Questioner wrote:
Get real thinks that private schools are better because they have higher rates of graduation and college attendance. Gee, ya think selective admissions have anything to do with that? What do you think happens to kids who flunk out of private school? The ones with behavior issues? Special needs? If I could select who gets into my classroom, and remove those who don't cut it, even I would look like a great teacher.
Your data on the average cost of private education are similarly flawed, as well as being at least a decade old.
Isn't it easy to be right when you cherry pick data and ignore inconvenient facts?
When demographically similar kids take the same test, the public school students outperform the privates.
So the question still is, why would you ask taxpayers to subsidize an education that is no better in quality, and deprives taxpayers of the oversight we deserve? This is the opposite of government transparency.
Well instead of spouting useless complaints show me some numbers. Show me the numbers that prove me wrong.

And yes. Many private schools are selective. Many schools want kids that are committed to working hard.

However you are forgetting that there are many private schools available for disabled children with curriculum specially designed for particular disabilities. There are special private schools for children with all types of learning disabilities. My wife and I worked with many children that attended a private school specially designed for children with special needs. The public school programs paled in comparison to the results of the private school. Children that were stuck in public schools moved into the private school and then were able to transition to schools that were "normal".

That is the beauty of competition. You compete for a market.

And you are implying that demographics determines intelligence? I prefer to think that no child is limited by their demographics.

Tell me when this thread is updated: (Registration is not required)

Add to my Tracker Send me an email

Showing posts 1 - 20 of23
< prev page
|
Go to last page| Jump to page:
Type in your comments below
Name
(appears on your post)
Comments
Characters left: 4000
Type the numbers you see in the image on the right:

Please note by clicking on "Post Comment" you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

•••
•••
•••
•••