An insufficient education for gifted children

Nov 30, 2007 Read more: The Morning Call 13
As Paul Carpenter states in his Nov. 27 column, virtually no gifted education exists in Pennsylvania public schools. Read more
Of The Mountain

Emmaus, PA

#1 Nov 30, 2007
NCLB was an attempt to make sure that children at the opposite end of the spectrum from "gifted" children were not ignored, as you claim your kids are. We can debate the method and results but not the intent

As you can imagine providing an educational opportunity to "stretch to your limits" for hundreds or thousands of students, each one an individual with their own learning style, capabilities, personality, etc., is a nearly impossible task given the financial limits a school district faces.

If you feel your children were not being stimulated enough, you had the option of supplementing their growth with activities YOU would provide outside of school (i.e., being good parents), or looking for another form of education, be it home schooling, private school, or whatever. You have chosen home schooling, which is your right to do.

I wouldn't worry too much about your children having some sort of issue with feeling their gifts aren't important. Based on your letter I will bet you constantly enforce to them what wonderful, special children they are.

Then again... shouldn't we be doing that with all children?
Easily Amused

Bethlehem, PA

#2 Nov 30, 2007
Aren't all kids gifted? Why don't we call kids who can do carpentry "gifted"?

You think your kid with an IQ of 140 is somehow damaged by being around people who aren't as bright? What do you think is going to happen at work. The gifted classes I took in high school were great but more important was that MOST of my time was spent in regular classes learning how to be a good student and a decent human being.
lebowski

United States

#3 Nov 30, 2007
I think what the writer is alluding to is they often throw gifted kids in with the homogenous population because they don't want to hurt anybody's feelings. Not too long after I was out of school, they stopped the heterogeneous grouping and switched to homogenous grouping. A student with an IQ of 140 should not be getting the same education of those students with an average IQ; you will stifle their development.
Easily Amused wrote:
Aren't all kids gifted? Why don't we call kids who can do carpentry "gifted"?
You think your kid with an IQ of 140 is somehow damaged by being around people who aren't as bright? What do you think is going to happen at work. The gifted classes I took in high school were great but more important was that MOST of my time was spent in regular classes learning how to be a good student and a decent human being.
ASD Parent

Allentown, PA

#4 Nov 30, 2007
I have two children and one falls into the gifted program and my other daughter falls into learning support. Each one is progressing at a pace that is comfortable for them. There is such a thing as pushing kids too hard that by the time they graduate, they have missed the FUN of High School. It is OK to be challenged by harder gifted classes, however, I don't want her having 3 hours of homework each night, I would rather she be hanging out with her friends or going to school basketball, softball or football games. There is plenty of time for my gifted daughter to be an adult and go to college and be challenged but for now, I would like her to be a carefree and happy normal high school student.
Easily Amused

Bethlehem, PA

#5 Nov 30, 2007
lebowski wrote:
A student with an IQ of 140 should not be getting the same education of those students with an average IQ; you will stifle their development.
<quoted text>
That statement is so self-evident that only a fool would argue. So here I go. Is there evidence to support that students who have higher IQ's are developmentally stifled by attending mainstream classes. It seems logical but so does the argument that home-schooling children will stifle their social development. I'm just not sure how true these two argument are.

I guess my real concern is not about gifted classes. I think it is the push for kids to achieve. I felt a lot of pressure to excel in school. Fortunately I was blessed with a healthy dose of laziness that trumped all of that.

I think kids should be pushed a bit and have the chance to do more if they want but like the ASD parent said - the social stuff is important too. If a kid is in all gifted classes AND gets along well with others and dates and goes to games - I think it is fine.
Wydok

Wyncote, PA

#6 Nov 30, 2007
Gifted education requires more teachers, and that requires more money. And we all know that nobody in the Lehigh Valley wants to spend money on education.
Bethlehem Resident

Bally, PA

#7 Nov 30, 2007
I'm thankful for the NCLB. It is also meant for students like my son who is gifted with superior IQ and yet he has learning support. It's not all about the money. It's about all the different ways children learn. My child goes to a non-public school where the teachers are not paid nearly the same and they have adapted to his needs as well as the needs of other students. Funny, they're a private institution and they choose to supplement. They're not mandated. They want to see that all students are successful.
We Are

Mount Laurel, NJ

#8 Nov 30, 2007
lebowski wrote:
I think what the writer is alluding to is they often throw gifted kids in with the homogenous population because they don't want to hurt anybody's feelings. Not too long after I was out of school, they stopped the heterogeneous grouping and switched to homogenous grouping. A student with an IQ of 140 should not be getting the same education of those students with an average IQ; you will stifle their development.
<quoted text>
3

Yes.. its called "Dumbing Down" .. and thanks to the no child left behind act, we now see teachers teaching at slower paces. You are only as strong as your weakest link. I was considered gifted through my whole school career simply based on a test in kindergarten or 1st grade. Anyway, I actually enjoyed the special "think tank" classes offered by my elementary school.. Then later you simply are placed into higher ranked classes with gifted and honor students..
taksavillage

Mertztown, PA

#9 Nov 30, 2007
Blame Bush for failures in the education system that have been festering for decades!? Great idea to homeschool, you have stumbled on the kind of self determination that doesn't need govt for help.

But when schools are warehousing children to release illiterates into the workforce, something had to be done.

“Your Own Peace Prize Inside”

Since: Mar 07

Hyannis, Mass

#10 Nov 30, 2007
Our son was identified as gifted at an early age (1st or 2nd grade). The BASD advised us to put him in the "advanced" program immediately. I was very happy with the results. He was no longer bored and applied himself to the new challenge. Eventually earning a full scholarship to an Ivy league school, were he will graduate from this spring. The Hi-tech firms are all after him. A success story - you bet. It's not PC to boast, but I'm not concerned with that. I only hope others will benefit from similar programs in the future.
ELIMINATE NOW

Palmerton, PA

#11 Nov 30, 2007
Under the Bush Admninistration and NCLB, there are NO gifted students. Instead, all students are robots with the same intellectual abilities and only can achieve a certain potential. This is evident by the push to bring low students up with the pack.

“Your Own Peace Prize Inside”

Since: Mar 07

Hyannis, Mass

#12 Nov 30, 2007
ELIMINATE NOW wrote:
Under the Bush Admninistration and NCLB, there are NO gifted students. Instead, all students are robots with the same intellectual abilities and only can achieve a certain potential. This is evident by the push to bring low students up with the pack.

Ahh - I see our friend from Mary D is back.
How's it going 24%.
Find any rocks to hide under?
Christina

Allentown, PA

#14 Jan 12, 2011
Bethlehem Resident wrote:
I'm thankful for the NCLB. It is also meant for students like my son who is gifted with superior IQ and yet he has learning support. It's not all about the money. It's about all the different ways children learn. My child goes to a non-public school where the teachers are not paid nearly the same and they have adapted to his needs as well as the needs of other students. Funny, they're a private institution and they choose to supplement. They're not mandated. They want to see that all students are successful.
Please tell me the name of your child's school. I'am looking for such a school for my gifted son. Thank you!

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