Possible Strike Looms as D228, Teache...

Possible Strike Looms as D228, Teachers Union Continue Contract Talks

There are 66 comments on the Patch.com story from Aug 22, 2012, titled Possible Strike Looms as D228, Teachers Union Continue Contract Talks. In it, Patch.com reports that:

Time is slipping away and it seems that neither representatives from the Joint Faculty Association nor those from Bremen School District 228 A are willing to back down.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Patch.com.

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Deakre

Chicago, IL

#1 Aug 23, 2012
Now that this negotiation seems to be heading for problems - let's pull out our books, computers and school supplies and review our lessons!

Teachers are looking for a new contract, District 228 is looking for concessions or not giving what the Teashers want! Are you still with me here? District 228 did give the Administrators a DOUBLE DIGIT raise, but the employees on the front line not so much! Let see would that be like telling the soldiers in War, we need you but find your own bullets and rations? Districts like 228 do not have reserves to shower on the district employees and costs continue to rise! If the state transfers pension responsibility to individual school district then, we the taxpayers are all doomed - Oh wait that is the next lesson!

Teachers and School Administration need to get this together, our children depend on them all to get this fixed! In this economy seems hard to justify rasies for administration or teachers, but then again, people have to live also! Most teachers in 228 are compensated well along with the Administration that is somewhat over-compensated, so you would think adults could get together and get this fixed! I would hate to see a strike and scabs hired as replacements that would kill any morale in the these schools and would not be recoverable!

Dr. Kendall you are the Leader here and a big boy that is compensated well, get down to negotiating and get this done! We the taxpayers want the children educated and educated well, not by any Tom, Dick or Harry on the street!
Tommy Two Toes

Chicago, IL

#2 Aug 23, 2012
They are WELL COMPENSATED for a 9 month job
look

Harvey, IL

#3 Aug 23, 2012
http://www.familytaxpayers.org/salary.php

I see why are taxes are so high!
not too shabby

Chicago, IL

#4 Aug 23, 2012
Holy Crap I should have become a teacher, and they want a double digit pay increase. I guess the 9200 in property taxes are not enough please raise them to 15,000 per year on my home, who cares if my home is only worth about 200,000 and is underwater. Lets destroy the middle working class.
poorkids

Garland, TX

#5 Aug 23, 2012
I have a kid that goes to Tinley Park high..very big into sports, she worked hard all summer for summer sports camp and works hard to keep her grades up, these kids are the ones getting hurt. Not just their grades but sports. These programs help keep our kids out of trouble and for what? To have to forfit games that they busted their butts at practicing for? I pray they don't strike, the girls swim team was affected last year cuz of updates that needed to be done that the school didn't fix. They shut down the pool in the middle of seaaon no notice..come dist 228..get it together, people pay a lot of taxes...7
Interesting Issues

Chicago, IL

#6 Aug 23, 2012
Tommy Two Toes wrote:
They are WELL COMPENSATED for a 9 month job
Are you telling us it is a simple job to do? You know the initial teacher's pay is not as lucrative as you think it is and most teachers only last 5 years due to the difficulty of the job! You know these folks work the school year which in most cases is 9 months, but many have to find 2nd jobs or part-time positions to make ends meet! These folks also do not I will say again - they do not get social security for their teaching profession! All other trades and careers still can tape into Social Security to augment any pensions. You make is sound like this job as a 9 month career is just a walk in the park!

When they strike and the replacement teachers come in which classroom do you want?
Tommy Two Toes

Chicago, IL

#7 Aug 23, 2012
Interesting Issues wrote:
<quoted text>
Are you telling us it is a simple job to do? You know the initial teacher's pay is not as lucrative as you think it is and most teachers only last 5 years due to the difficulty of the job! You know these folks work the school year which in most cases is 9 months, but many have to find 2nd jobs or part-time positions to make ends meet! These folks also do not I will say again - they do not get social security for their teaching profession! All other trades and careers still can tape into Social Security to augment any pensions. You make is sound like this job as a 9 month career is just a walk in the park!
When they strike and the replacement teachers come in which classroom do you want?
Did you look at their salaries ???/ or are you just talking from your rear end??

The lowest paid full timers are in the mid $60's so that equates to $100,000.00 if they worked 12 months and even more if they worked full days (Since they are only required to teach 275 Minutes a day)

We cant afford anymore SCHOOL property taxes.
Ruth Ensing

Harvey, IL

#8 Aug 23, 2012
I'll take a teacher's pension over Social Security any day. Not against teachers making a decent living but public pensions are becoming unsustainable.
Know the facts

Forest Park, IL

#9 Aug 23, 2012
Tommy Two Toes wrote:
<quoted text>
Did you look at their salaries ???/ or are you just talking from your rear end??
The lowest paid full timers are in the mid $60's so that equates to $100,000.00 if they worked 12 months and even more if they worked full days (Since they are only required to teach 275 Minutes a day)
We cant afford anymore SCHOOL property taxes.
The starting pay for new teachers (not "full timers" as you refer to them. Be bitter about their salaries if you choose, but be respectful of what they do) is nowhere near the mid $60's. You also say they are only required to teach 275 minutes per day. I suppose the lessons they teach in those 275 minutes write themselves? The students' work must also grade itself since we know that there's no way teachers actually take work home and sacrifice time with their own families.

I'd also like to point out that I know of teachers who make it a point to attend students' games or other school related events, on their own time, because they know those students do not come from homes where the parents can or are willing to come out and support them. I think a lot of us can admit that we don't have that kind of dedication in our own jobs, which is why we don't understand the teaching profession. When our work day is over, it's over.

In recent years, I've seen teachers escort students at senior night for sports and for other events when the parents can't be there. I also know of teachers who have missed out on important milestones with their own kids in order to be there for their students. These teachers value what they do for a living and see the bigger picture.

Many people seem to forget that there's more to these kids than test scores. Sure, we can all name some incompetent teachers, but isn't it the administrators' job to weed out the bad ones and make sure that the teachers in their school are doing their job? Let's all join together to fight that fight.

I'm interested in a productive debate on fixing public education in Illinois, but tearing apart an entire profession does nothing to promote an educated and informed dialogue on the issue. Look to Finland as a model for how we should structure the improvements in our schools.

By the way, they respect their teachers for the professionals they are AND they pay them a heck of a lot more. Maybe we should follow a model that works.
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/16/education/1...
Deakre

Chicago, IL

#10 Aug 23, 2012
Tommy Two Toes wrote:
<quoted text>
Did you look at their salaries ???/ or are you just talking from your rear end??
The lowest paid full timers are in the mid $60's so that equates to $100,000.00 if they worked 12 months and even more if they worked full days (Since they are only required to teach 275 Minutes a day)
We cant afford anymore SCHOOL property taxes.
Guess What here is the old saying - You will pay now to educate them or you will pay later to jail them! And if you read the Illinois Constitution - the state of Illinois is responsible to fund education, which they have not done for many years!
Deakre

Chicago, IL

#11 Aug 23, 2012
Ruth Ensing wrote:
I'll take a teacher's pension over Social Security any day. Not against teachers making a decent living but public pensions are becoming unsustainable.
I will give you the number to the High School, get yourself in and see how you can do it then maybe you could work into the pension system you want! Public pensions were of course negotiated by collective bargaining - and by law the State of Illinois should be funding those also, but many, many years ago they stopped paying their part! So call the principle and get yourself in I am sure you will be able to do their job!
Tommy Two Toes

Chicago, IL

#12 Aug 24, 2012
Deakre wrote:
<quoted text>
Guess What here is the old saying - You will pay now to educate them or you will pay later to jail them! And if you read the Illinois Constitution - the state of Illinois is responsible to fund education, which they have not done for many years!
They are being paid GENEROUSLY........ The average salary in SD 228 is $85,000.00 for a NINE MONTH JOB! Not many places you can make that with just a bachelors. The Constitution says alot of things... And the children are being educated. Let them strike i dont care ... Strike = NO PAY then after a week FIRE whoever didn't come back. Then we'll see if the $85,000 average was still enough.
Tommy Two Toes

Chicago, IL

#13 Aug 24, 2012
Know the facts wrote:
<quoted text>
The starting pay for new teachers (not "full timers" as you refer to them. Be bitter about their salaries if you choose, but be respectful of what they do) is nowhere near the mid $60's. You also say they are only required to teach 275 minutes per day. I suppose the lessons they teach in those 275 minutes write themselves? The students' work must also grade itself since we know that there's no way teachers actually take work home and sacrifice time with their own families.
I'd also like to point out that I know of teachers who make it a point to attend students' games or other school related events, on their own time, because they know those students do not come from homes where the parents can or are willing to come out and support them. I think a lot of us can admit that we don't have that kind of dedication in our own jobs, which is why we don't understand the teaching profession. When our work day is over, it's over.
In recent years, I've seen teachers escort students at senior night for sports and for other events when the parents can't be there. I also know of teachers who have missed out on important milestones with their own kids in order to be there for their students. These teachers value what they do for a living and see the bigger picture.
Many people seem to forget that there's more to these kids than test scores. Sure, we can all name some incompetent teachers, but isn't it the administrators' job to weed out the bad ones and make sure that the teachers in their school are doing their job? Let's all join together to fight that fight.
I'm interested in a productive debate on fixing public education in Illinois, but tearing apart an entire profession does nothing to promote an educated and informed dialogue on the issue. Look to Finland as a model for how we should structure the improvements in our schools.
By the way, they respect their teachers for the professionals they are AND they pay them a heck of a lot more. Maybe we should follow a model that works.
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/16/education/1...
I know the facts.... They are well paid for 9 months of work. Let them strike... Theres loads of unemployed teachers that are hungry and will take the $85,000 average salary
Tommy Two Toes

Chicago, IL

#14 Aug 24, 2012
Deakre wrote:
<quoted text>
I will give you the number to the High School, get yourself in and see how you can do it then maybe you could work into the pension system you want! Public pensions were of course negotiated by collective bargaining - and by law the State of Illinois should be funding those also, but many, many years ago they stopped paying their part! So call the principle and get yourself in I am sure you will be able to do their job!
First off the state ISNT required by law to fund the TEACHERS pension. secondly i hope your not a teacher at the HS you spelled Principal WRONG!

Since: Oct 09

Location hidden

#15 Aug 24, 2012
Deakre wrote:
<quoted text>
I will give you the number to the High School, get yourself in and see how you can do it then maybe you could work into the pension system you want! Public pensions were of course negotiated by collective bargaining - and by law the State of Illinois should be funding those also, but many, many years ago they stopped paying their part! So call the principle and get yourself in I am sure you will be able to do their job!
Yes, you're right as their pension was negotiated by collective bargaining, but, lets realize something. When a public union collective bargains against its employer, just who are they negotiating against? Wait, think about it, yes that's right, they're negotiating against the government, which is you, me and even themselves.

Now, answer me this. Since they had these rights to negotiate, why didn't the union leaders demand that the legislature fund these pensions over the years or when negotiating with the local boards did they not demand that Administrators salaries be no more than x% of the top teachers pay? The unions donate large sums of cash to these people, so why didnt they put the screws to them? They all knew the pensions were not being funded, so why did they let it happen? Here's why, because the gravy train was rolling during those years. As long as the raises kept coming, they ignored the looming pension fiasco. Higher salaries for union members, mean more dues for union leaders.

The front line teachers do a good job and kudos to them, but the lip service that the union gives about it 'being for the children' has to stop. If they were truly concerned about the kids, they would have not let this happen in the first place.
Tommy Two Toes

Chicago, IL

#16 Aug 24, 2012
OF Watch wrote:
<quoted text>
Yes, you're right as their pension was negotiated by collective bargaining, but, lets realize something. When a public union collective bargains against its employer, just who are they negotiating against? Wait, think about it, yes that's right, they're negotiating against the government, which is you, me and even themselves.
Now, answer me this. Since they had these rights to negotiate, why didn't the union leaders demand that the legislature fund these pensions over the years or when negotiating with the local boards did they not demand that Administrators salaries be no more than x% of the top teachers pay? The unions donate large sums of cash to these people, so why didnt they put the screws to them? They all knew the pensions were not being funded, so why did they let it happen? Here's why, because the gravy train was rolling during those years. As long as the raises kept coming, they ignored the looming pension fiasco. Higher salaries for union members, mean more dues for union leaders.
The front line teachers do a good job and kudos to them, but the lip service that the union gives about it 'being for the children' has to stop. If they were truly concerned about the kids, they would have not let this happen in the first place.
Very intelligently said... Thanks!
Interesting Issues

Chicago, IL

#17 Aug 24, 2012
Tommy Two Toes wrote:
<quoted text>
First off the state ISNT required by law to fund the TEACHERS pension. secondly i hope your not a teacher at the HS you spelled Principal WRONG!
I would disagree with you, the State does fund the Teachers Retirement System and the Illinois Municpal Retirement Funds, with contributions from those employees! The only organization that funds their own pensions is the Chicago Public School System, which was negotiated in the Legislature many years ago. That is the discussion all the folks are having now in Springfield about public pensions. Moving the costs to the employees and the individual districts. Which is just passing the burden back to the taxpayers! This is the heart of the discussions and problems. The congress in their infinite wisdom were supposed to make fund payments and they did not! Once the Stock market crashed then there was no buffer! That is not correcting the problem we have now, because the State now has no money to keep paying these benefits! They have been using these funds like credit cards and now the bill and interest has come due!
Tommy Two Toes

Chicago, IL

#18 Aug 24, 2012
Interesting Issues wrote:
<quoted text>
I would disagree with you, the State does fund the Teachers Retirement System and the Illinois Municpal Retirement Funds, with contributions from those employees! The only organization that funds their own pensions is the Chicago Public School System, which was negotiated in the Legislature many years ago. That is the discussion all the folks are having now in Springfield about public pensions. Moving the costs to the employees and the individual districts. Which is just passing the burden back to the taxpayers! This is the heart of the discussions and problems. The congress in their infinite wisdom were supposed to make fund payments and they did not! Once the Stock market crashed then there was no buffer! That is not correcting the problem we have now, because the State now has no money to keep paying these benefits! They have been using these funds like credit cards and now the bill and interest has come due!
True but the state is NOT legally mandated by the Constitution to pay this.
R Long

Tinley Park, IL

#19 Aug 24, 2012
Before you tell others to check the facts, I suggest you do the same. Go th the state web site that posts all of the salaries of ALL the teachers. You will be surprised, if not shocked, by the amount of money they are paid from OUR TAXES. Then you can add retirement to that. I see most teachers leaving the parking lot of the High Schools with or before the students. If the teachers are also involved in sports activities, they are compensated for that in addition to their salary. There are a few teachers that actually do care, but they are becoming the exception to the rule.

As for your comments that the "students work must grade itself" once again you need to do a fact check. Most if not all tests are graded through a computer system, with perhaps those in essay format. Did you know that grammar & spelling is no longer in schools beyond the middle school. What then does an English teacher teach. But in todays computer age, the students are "taught" to utilize spell check and hope that their computer has a grammar check as well.

It's time that the teachers and administrators begin to live in the real world where pay increase are small, 1% or 2%, if received at all. Teachers have forgotten that they are employees of the tax payers. If they want a raise, but it on a ballot for the citizens to vote for or against. In todays economic environment where parents are loosing jobs and their kids cannot find a job, even with a college degree, I would venture to guess that a referendum for a pay raise would fail be a land slide.

Get with the real world and get your information straight before you give others advise.
Know the facts wrote:
<quoted text>
The starting pay for new teachers (not "full timers" as you refer to them. Be bitter about their salaries if you choose, but be respectful of what they do) is nowhere near the mid $60's. You also say they are only required to teach 275 minutes per day. I suppose the lessons they teach in those 275 minutes write themselves? The students' work must also grade itself since we know that there's no way teachers actually take work home and sacrifice time with their own families.
I'd also like to point out that I know of teachers who make it a point to attend students' games or other school related events, on their own time, because they know those students do not come from homes where the parents can or are willing to come out and support them. I think a lot of us can admit that we don't have that kind of dedication in our own jobs, which is why we don't understand the teaching profession. When our work day is over, it's over.
In recent years, I've seen teachers escort students at senior night for sports and for other events when the parents can't be there. I also know of teachers who have missed out on important milestones with their own kids in order to be there for their students. These teachers value what they do for a living and see the bigger picture.
Many people seem to forget that there's more to these kids than test scores. Sure, we can all name some incompetent teachers, but isn't it the administrators' job to weed out the bad ones and make sure that the teachers in their school are doing their job? Let's all join together to fight that fight.
I'm interested in a productive debate on fixing public education in Illinois, but tearing apart an entire profession does nothing to promote an educated and informed dialogue on the issue. Look to Finland as a model for how we should structure the improvements in our schools.
By the way, they respect their teachers for the professionals they are AND they pay them a heck of a lot more. Maybe we should follow a model that works.
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/16/education/1...
R Long

Tinley Park, IL

#20 Aug 24, 2012
Once again you are wrong! It is State law, if not written in the Constitution, that the State IS responsible for the teachers retirement plan. It is a fact that the state has borrowed against the fund to the point where they can never hope to pay it back. Now they want to pass the debt to the suburban taxpayers who already have paid into the fund. Tommy, you need to stop drinking the coolaide!
Tommy Two Toes wrote:
<quoted text>
True but the state is NOT legally mandated by the Constitution to pay this.

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