Histroy of Chatenay-Malabry Lab.
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Wayne

United States

#21 Aug 7, 2006
Insider wrote:
<quoted text>
Yeah. Like the Tour de France organisers are really keen to get some more worldwide bad publicity.
I doubt if the Organizers are happy about this flap. They put on a great tour...but now, this.

I wonder how many more of the top riders are still being tested by the drug cops.

---Salem oregon---
zwrites

New Orleans, LA

#22 Aug 7, 2006
I work in the medical field these are not bizarre excuses. Labs make mistakes, all the time...in much more important issues than... who...is doping in a race. Plus...from a bio-chem point of view...how do you get a high count in the middle of a bunch urine test and lows before and after. I think all labs should have a 2 person sign off...for their procedures. 2 people eyeballing every step...if these races want to avoid controversy. Thank God in the medical field we look for these discrepencies and willing to correct our mistakes because the outcome is important. If Floyd did cheat I hope is comes out...but these test don't have me convinced. If the lab did something wrong... I hope it comes out because it labels someone who is innocent. The riders and fans deserve accurate doping testing procedures.
Z
GB+
Z
GB+
Harvestmark

Redwood City, CA

#23 Aug 8, 2006
I found this article in the New York Times Archives published in 1997




----------

Doubts on Testosterone Test

Published: June 17, 1997
Testosterone, the male hormone that led to the suspensions of the track stars MARY SLANEY and SANDRA FARMER-PATRICK, should be dropped from the list of banned drugs unless a foolproof test can be developed, the head of the United States Olympic Committee said yesterday.

DICK SCHULTZ said the recent cases underscored doubts about current tests for a substance that occurs naturally in the body. Over the next two weeks, the U.S.O.C. will convene a panel of experts to try to establish ironclad tests. If no such tests can be found, Schultz said, the panel will tell the International Olympic Committee it should strike testosterone from its ban list.

More Articles in Health >



----------

Slaney Addresses Test Result
Print
Save



Published: May 26, 1997
Mary Slaney said being suspected of using a performance-enhancing drug is the most painful thing she has endured in her injury-plagued running career.

''This is an attack on my integrity,'' Slaney told an Oregon newspaper, The Eugene Register-Guard.''It is an attack on everything that I believe to be good in the sport. I feel like this whole thing is going to taint everything I've ever done athletically.''

In an interview broadcast by CBS yesterday during the network's coverage of the Prefontaine Classic, Slaney repeated her denial that she had taken performance-enhancing drugs.

''I have never taken anything that's banned,'' she said.''That's absurd. I haven't done what I've been accused of doing.''

Her comments came days after word leaked that Slaney, 38, had tested positively for excessive levels of the male sex hormone testosterone at last year's United States Olympic Trials.


continued
Harvestmark

Redwood City, CA

#24 Aug 8, 2006
More on Mary Decker Slaney

TRACK AND FIELD; Slaney Suing the I.A.A.F. In Dispute Over a Drug Test



By FRANK LITSKY
Published: April 14, 1999
The battle between Mary Decker Slaney, the former world champion middle-distance runner, and international sports officials over her testosterone level has extended to two continents, with neither side backing down.

On Monday, in the United States District Court in Indianapolis, Slaney sued the International Amateur Athletic Federation, track and field's world governing body. The suit also named the United States Olympic Committee as a defendant. Jim Coleman, Slaney's lawyer, called the 1996 drug test that Slaney failed ''totally dishonest.''

Yesterday, the I.A.A.F. said it would defend itself in the suit. It also reaffirmed that its arbitration panel would convene April 24 in Monte Carlo, Monoco, as scheduled, to resume hearing the case.

Slaney, now 40, was the 1983 world champion at 1,500 and 3,000 meters and once held every American women's outdoor record from 800 through 10,000 meters. During the 1996 United States Olympic trials in Atlanta, she was one of the athletes routinely tested by the United States Olympic Committee for illegal drugs. The report on her test said she had a testosterone-epitestosterone level higher than the 6:1 ratio that international rules allow.

Testosterone and epitestosterone are hormones that occur naturally in the body. Testosterone, which helps build muscle mass and allows an athlete to train harder and longer, can also be produced artificially. Slaney said she has not taken artificial testosterone.

American officials suspended her in 1997, but an appeals panel reinstated her. Angered international officials then took the case to arbitration, and that procedure was adjourned last week.

The I.A.A.F considers a T-E ratio of 1:1 normal for men and women, and the 6:1 ratio was adopted to account for natural variations. Slaney contends that the test is invalid for women, and her suit asks that it be thrown out.

''Both the U.S.O.C. and I.A.A.F. know that things other than doping can cause a woman's T-E ratio to go above 6:1,'' Coleman said. During the first arbitration hearing, her lawyers presented research from endocrinologists and statisticians at Duke University that suggested that the testosterone test is flawed for women in their late 30's and early 40's who take birth-control pills, as Slaney does.

In Monte Carlo, Giorgio Reineri, an I.A.A.F. spokesman, talked of jurisdiction, not testosterone levels. He said:''In whichever country, civil justice does not have the right to judge sporting rules of an international federation. The I.A.A.F. cannot be under the jurisdiction of a court in Indiana. I.A.A.F. rules are enforced in 209 countries, and the rules are the same for everyone. Otherwise, there would be confusion and chaos.''

Coleman said inaction by the I.A.A.F. prompted the suit.''The I.A.A.F. has no other way to detect the use of testosterone,'' the lawyer said.''Rather than trying to find a valid way, they are willing to take the chance that they will prosecute and damage an innocent athlete.''
Harvestmark

Redwood City, CA

#25 Aug 8, 2006
I used to watch Mary Decker Slaney for years. I never realised about her problems until recently.
I found this article in the Newy York Times Archives published in 1997
----------
Doubts on Testosterone Test
Published: June 17, 1997
Testosterone, the male hormone that led to the suspensions of the track stars MARY SLANEY and SANDRA FARMER-PATRICK, should be dropped from the list of banned drugs unless a foolproof test can be developed, the head of the United States Olympic Committee said yesterday.
DICK SCHULTZ said the recent cases underscored doubts about current tests for a substance that occurs naturally in the body. Over the next two weeks, the U.S.O.C. will convene a panel of experts to try to establish ironclad tests. If no such tests can be found, Schultz said, the panel will tell the International Olympic Committee it should strike testosterone from its ban list.
More Articles in Health >
----------
Slaney Addresses Test Result
Print
Save
Published: May 26, 1997
Mary Slaney said being suspected of using a performance-enhancing drug is the most painful thing she has endured in her injury-plagued running career.
''This is an attack on my integrity,'' Slaney told an Oregon newspaper, The Eugene Register-Guard.''It is an attack on everything that I believe to be good in the sport. I feel like this whole thing is going to taint everything I've ever done athletically.''
In an interview broadcast by CBS yesterday during the network's coverage of the Prefontaine Classic, Slaney repeated her denial that she had taken performance-enhancing drugs.
''I have never taken anything that's banned,'' she said.''That's absurd. I haven't done what I've been accused of doing.''
Her comments came days after word leaked that Slaney, 38, had tested positively for excessive levels of the male sex hormone testosterone at last year's United States Olympic Trials.
Harvestmark

Redwood City, CA

#26 Aug 8, 2006

I used to watch Mary Decker Slaney for years. I never realised about her problems until recently.

I found this article in the New York Times Archives published in 1997




----------

Doubts on Testosterone Test

Published: June 17, 1997
Testosterone, the male hormone that led to the suspensions of the track stars MARY SLANEY and SANDRA FARMER-PATRICK, should be dropped from the list of banned drugs unless a foolproof test can be developed, the head of the United States Olympic Committee said yesterday.

DICK SCHULTZ said the recent cases underscored doubts about current tests for a substance that occurs naturally in the body. Over the next two weeks, the U.S.O.C. will convene a panel of experts to try to establish ironclad tests. If no such tests can be found, Schultz said, the panel will tell the International Olympic Committee it should strike testosterone from its ban list.

More Articles in Health >



----------

Slaney Addresses Test Result
Print
Save



Published: May 26, 1997
Mary Slaney said being suspected of using a performance-enhancing drug is the most painful thing she has endured in her injury-plagued running career.

''This is an attack on my integrity,'' Slaney told an Oregon newspaper, The Eugene Register-Guard.''It is an attack on everything that I believe to be good in the sport. I feel like this whole thing is going to taint everything I've ever done athletically.''

In an interview broadcast by CBS yesterday during the network's coverage of the Prefontaine Classic, Slaney repeated her denial that she had taken performance-enhancing drugs.

''I have never taken anything that's banned,'' she said.''That's absurd. I haven't done what I've been accused of doing.''

Her comments came days after word leaked that Slaney, 38, had tested positively for excessive levels of the male sex hormone testosterone at last year's United States Olympic Trials.

continuation

“crystelZENmud”

Since: Jan 07

Reality City

#27 Jun 29, 2007
RESURRECTED for your reading pleasure: I note that Wayne was HERE, long before I joined the game...:-)

Harvestmark's posts are redundant, yet interesting... and humbled to know I was NOT the pioneer against LNDD...

Chapeau!

ZENhatzoff

“I Love Life, People & Animals”

Since: Feb 07

El Paso, Texas

#28 Jun 30, 2007
Harvestmark wrote:
I used to watch Mary Decker Slaney for years. I never realised about her problems until recently.
I found this article in the New York Times Archives published in 1997
----------
Doubts on Testosterone Test
Published: June 17, 1997
Testosterone, the male hormone that led to the suspensions of the track stars MARY SLANEY and SANDRA FARMER-PATRICK, should be dropped from the list of banned drugs unless a foolproof test can be developed, the head of the United States Olympic Committee said yesterday.
DICK SCHULTZ said the recent cases underscored doubts about current tests for a substance that occurs naturally in the body. Over the next two weeks, the U.S.O.C. will convene a panel of experts to try to establish ironclad tests. If no such tests can be found, Schultz said, the panel will tell the International Olympic Committee it should strike testosterone from its ban list.
More Articles in Health >
----------
Slaney Addresses Test Result
Print
Save
Published: May 26, 1997
Mary Slaney said being suspected of using a performance-enhancing drug is the most painful thing she has endured in her injury-plagued running career.
''This is an attack on my integrity,'' Slaney told an Oregon newspaper, The Eugene Register-Guard.''It is an attack on everything that I believe to be good in the sport. I feel like this whole thing is going to taint everything I've ever done athletically.''
In an interview broadcast by CBS yesterday during the network's coverage of the Prefontaine Classic, Slaney repeated her denial that she had taken performance-enhancing drugs.
''I have never taken anything that's banned,'' she said.''That's absurd. I haven't done what I've been accused of doing.''
Her comments came days after word leaked that Slaney, 38, had tested positively for excessive levels of the male sex hormone testosterone at last year's United States Olympic Trials.
continuation
Than where was DICK SCHULTZ when the Floyd Landis case popped up?

Cheers

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