Suspended attorney ordered to stand trial in lethal overdose

“He was getting it into her blood so she would do things he wanted her to do. He's responsible.”

Attorneys for Ronald Plunkett admitted in court Thursday that the suspended Ann Arbor lawyer provided the money and transportation to feed his girlfriend's and his own severe crack cocaine and heroin habits. via Latest from the Ann Arbor News - MLiv...

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mdev

Wixom, MI

#83 Feb 27, 2008
lexaquilia wrote:
i think it is unfortunate that the young lady is in prison. i believe our insistence on incarceration over treatment for the disease of addiction, which is proven to be quite effective, is a sad legacy of our society. a complete waste of resources. btw i have complete faith in his sincere desire to right any wrongs he may have committed. this faith is born of my personal observation of his diligent pursuit of freedom from this horrible disease which, as evidenced by this entire topic, touches and destroys so many. have faith my friend.
Good answer. Can't argue with any that!!
run75441

Pinckney, MI

#84 Feb 27, 2008
lexaquilia wrote:
i think it is unfortunate that the young lady is in prison. i believe our insistence on incarceration over treatment for the disease of addiction, which is proven to be quite effective, is a sad legacy of our society. a complete waste of resources. btw i have complete faith in his sincere desire to right any wrongs he may have committed. this faith is born of my personal observation of his diligent pursuit of freedom from this horrible disease which, as evidenced by this entire topic, touches and destroys so many. have faith my friend.
Lex:

Let me politely tell you, you do not know the man in question here. The only way he can get absolution from us is to admit to the lies he said to the court in several cases so far. It is in transcript.

Ron is playing you. Diligent pursue of freedom? How about his victims, his clients, the ones he betrayed in court? You do not know the man. You think you do; but, you don't. Cute little episode in court with Maugham's "The Razor's Edge." I was impressed. Gee, I wonder if he ever finished his prop. Looked like he was 3 pages into it that day.
run75441

Pinckney, MI

#85 Feb 27, 2008
mdev wrote:
<quoted text>
Good answer. Can't argue with any that!!
mdev:

This is an act. He is playing you and you are all falling for it.
mdev

Wixom, MI

#86 Feb 28, 2008
run75441 wrote:
<quoted text>
mdev:
This is an act. He is playing you and you are all falling for it.
I beg to differ because people do change if they want recovery bad enough, i did. So im not saying Mr. Plunkett is excused from any wrong doings, but if he is working the program, he will do the next right thing. I do want you and your family to have justice, along with all the other families that Ron has wronged.I am a firm believer in a "12 step" program and only time will tell with Mr. Plunkett. I do wish you and your family the best.
lexaquilia

Bloomfield Hills, MI

#87 Feb 28, 2008
i can speak to this issue from my own experience in recovery. i had the opportunity to work on my 9th step and actually made all the "difficult" amends. what i found is that most people understand we all make mistakes, we are all flawed, and that we all fail perfection...most people when they are approached by a person genuinely attempting to right the wrongs of past behavior, someone who humbly admits their discretions and doesnt ask for forgiveness, but what can be done to make it right in the other persons eyes are touched and there is a very powerful spiritual moment in time when 2 people connect and understand their humanity. On several occasions I made amends and the person broke down and started spilling the beans to me, dying to get all of these secrets of their chest. People we are human. We have all erred. The point of the 9th steps is to attempt to repair relationships torn asunder by addiction. If somebody is not there yet in their recovery, be patient, they will get there. Our very lives depend on thoroughly working ALL the steps. So to all of you who say to me "i dont know this guy" "i am being hoodwinked"...if you knew me 5 or 6 years ago and the me today...you would not believe it. i am sure many said the same things about me. i know my family had given up. i wasnt allowed in my own moms house. 2 years ago i had the pleasure of buying my mother a brand new car, something she has never had. people do change. have faith, and nothing can destroy us like hatred and anger. only love and compassion can overcome these things. and believe me i have a difficult time forgiving some people, but when i look at my own shortcomings, my faults, my struggles, my own life..when i look at that honestly...really how can i judge another man. i cant. all i can do is pray and have faith that things work out. and guess what...they will. peace
run75441

Pinckney, MI

#88 Feb 29, 2008
lexaquilia wrote:
i can speak to this issue from my own experience in recovery. i had the opportunity to work on my 9th step and actually made all the "difficult" amends. what i found is that most people understand we all make mistakes, we are all flawed, and that we all fail perfection...most people when they are approached by a person genuinely attempting to right the wrongs of past behavior, someone who humbly admits their discretions and doesnt ask for forgiveness, but what can be done to make it right in the other persons eyes are touched and there is a very powerful spiritual moment in time when 2 people connect and understand their humanity. On several occasions I made amends and the person broke down and started spilling the beans to me, dying to get all of these secrets of their chest. People we are human. We have all erred. The point of the 9th steps is to attempt to repair relationships torn asunder by addiction. If somebody is not there yet in their recovery, be patient, they will get there. Our very lives depend on thoroughly working ALL the steps. So to all of you who say to me "i dont know this guy" "i am being hoodwinked"...if you knew me 5 or 6 years ago and the me today...you would not believe it. i am sure many said the same things about me. i know my family had given up. i wasnt allowed in my own moms house. 2 years ago i had the pleasure of buying my mother a brand new car, something she has never had. people do change. have faith, and nothing can destroy us like hatred and anger. only love and compassion can overcome these things. and believe me i have a difficult time forgiving some people, but when i look at my own shortcomings, my faults, my struggles, my own life..when i look at that honestly...really how can i judge another man. i cant. all i can do is pray and have faith that things work out. and guess what...they will. peace
"lexaquilia:"

It is pretty obvious you have not read the length of this thread. I wish I could meet you and plop in front of you the "Ginther" motion describing the activities of this man. The only way he can atone to us (including the others here) is for him to stand in court, the very same court you malign for sentencing people with addictions, and tell the court; he failed to prepare for trial, he perjured himself in court, and he lied to his clients. Lex, there are several people in prison because this man did not do as he said he would do and subsequently covered his actions up.

Now, do you really think he will risk going to prison by doing what I suggested? He was terrified at his last Hearing of the prospect and it was written all over his face as he walked out. You do not know the man. You only see what has happened since Ypsilanti. If he did do as I suggested, several men would be having new trials.

What you know is the superficial man and there is another man below that surface. He has not told you everything and he will not do so.
run75441

Pinckney, MI

#89 Feb 29, 2008
mdev wrote:
<quoted text>
I beg to differ because people do change if they want recovery bad enough, i did. So im not saying Mr. Plunkett is excused from any wrong doings, but if he is working the program, he will do the next right thing. I do want you and your family to have justice, along with all the other families that Ron has wronged.I am a firm believer in a "12 step" program and only time will tell with Mr. Plunkett. I do wish you and your family the best.
mdev:

I do wish you well. If you have been reading this thread carefully, you know there are several people in prison because of his actions. He is not going to risk the prospect.
lexaquilia

Birmingham, MI

#90 Feb 29, 2008
well tell me this. i committed a crime years back, and i payed a ton of money to an attorney who pulled every legal gimmick in the book and got the case thrown out. i was guilty. i was directed to make amends for actions by making donations every month for one year to a legal aid fund for the poor. anonymously. i did that. it is unfortunate that if you have the wealth to hire the best you get a better outcome. i mean just yesterday they announced that 1 out of every 9 african americans between 18 and 24 are in prison!!!!!!!!! failure of public defenders???? absolutely. were these kids railroaded into pleading guilty to lesser charge plea bargains...damn right they were. are many of them innocent. of course. it happens every day....and it is a sad comment on the broader problems with our legal system and we could debate that in another thread. life isnt always fair. however, you know, when we hire somebody to do a job for us, we reserve the right to fire that person at any point. and if you were so uncomfortable during the entire process (yes i did read the threads completely), you really should have asked for new council.(i had to do it when i was being sued civilly 10+ years ago, and the judge granted it)...i was concerned about my attorneys erratic behavior and tactics. i would definitely do it if my freedom was on the line. you can bet your ass if i am facing time, i am involved in every aspect of the case. but anyhow, it doesnt change anything i have stated previously. if he has done something wrong i am sure he will right it. have faith and patience.
lexaquilia

Birmingham, MI

#91 Feb 29, 2008
i have to laugh about one thing. please indulge me. "he perjured himself in court"...my GOD. do you know who perjures themselves the most in a court room? and this is a fact. police officers and prosecuting attorneys. please. it happens every day, in every court room in america. if you have a case, simply hire an attorney, file an appeal, and plead your case requesting a new trial.
run75441

Pinckney, MI

#92 Feb 29, 2008
lexaquilia wrote:
i have to laugh about one thing. please indulge me. "he perjured himself in court"...my GOD. do you know who perjures themselves the most in a court room? and this is a fact. police officers and prosecuting attorneys. please. it happens every day, in every court room in america. if you have a case, simply hire an attorney, file an appeal, and plead your case requesting a new trial.
lex:

You are entitled to your laughter; but after one fires an attorney and then they march off into chambers to lie to the judge, we then have what is called "exparte" conversation and subsequent perjury in and to the court. Let me assure you, I know way to much about the law as a result.

There was no reason to doubt and when we asked if everything was under control, we were told it was and that it was being taken care of. When I suggested another attorney, we were told he had it under control. When we caught the person in a lie and subsequently asked for new council, he took revenge by going to judge's chambers, lying to the judge, then perjurying themselves in court, and claiming readiness for trial.

When you go to a doctor, you go with a large degree of trust in that they will provide a solution to your illness and tell you the truth about it. You go to the doctor because you trust in their ability to give a diagnosis and you also know they will refer you if they can not diagnose your illness properly. The same applies to attorneys. You place your trust in their ability to guide you through the legal morass, we call a justice system today. You have no reason to doubt and you place your faith in their ability as attorneys because you can not go elsewhere.

It is interesting the media finally caught up with the numerics of who occupies prison cells these days. Unfortunately, they missed a large portion of the reason. A portion of a recent paper of mine on the topic of violence, minorities, and prisoners.

"In Gilligan’s Violence, James Gilligan cites H.A. Bulhan reference to structural violence. Referring to Brenner’s findings, Bulhan cites that for every 1% increase in unemployment in the United States, there was an increased mortality of 37,000 deaths per year (natural and violent) including ~2,000 more suicides and homicides than might otherwise occur. Or explained in clearer terms, for every 1% increase in Unemployment, we can expect to see increases in the mortality rate by 2%, homicides and imprisonments by 6%, and infant mortality by 5%. H.A Bulhan also points out the unemployment rate for blacks has been twice as high as that of whites since WWII.(Frantz Fanon and the Psychology of Oppression; H.A Bulhan; Mental Illness and the Economy, M.H Brenner). Given the higher dropout rates of males and minority males, the disappearance of unskilled jobs in the US, and the high unemployment rate over the last 8 years; is it any wonder ...."

Sounds like the media is finally catching up. It would be nice if they understood why more minorities have taken up residence in state prisons. It would also be nice if they understood that today's umemployment rate is understated by about 1.5%.

If you really want to get on to the topic of the justice system, violence, crime, the economy, and minorities; I can accomodate you. Learned quite a bit about the justice system, diminished capaity, no capacity, mens rea, volition, etc. The economy, I have multiple degrees.

Coffee sometime? I am an average citizen and an advocate for prisoners.
run75441

Pinckney, MI

#93 Feb 29, 2008
lexaquilia wrote:
well tell me this. i committed a crime years back, and i payed a ton of money to an attorney who pulled every legal gimmick in the book and got the case thrown out. i was guilty. i was directed to make amends for actions by making donations every month for one year to a legal aid fund for the poor. anonymously. i did that. it is unfortunate that if you have the wealth to hire the best you get a better outcome. i mean just yesterday they announced that 1 out of every 9 african americans between 18 and 24 are in prison!!!!!!!!! failure of public defenders???? absolutely. were these kids railroaded into pleading guilty to lesser charge plea bargains...damn right they were. are many of them innocent. of course. it happens every day....and it is a sad comment on the broader problems with our legal system and we could debate that in another thread. life isnt always fair. however, you know, when we hire somebody to do a job for us, we reserve the right to fire that person at any point. and if you were so uncomfortable during the entire process (yes i did read the threads completely), you really should have asked for new council.(i had to do it when i was being sued civilly 10+ years ago, and the judge granted it)...i was concerned about my attorneys erratic behavior and tactics. i
would definitely do it if my freedom was on the line. you can bet your ass if i am facing time, i am involved in every aspect of the case. but anyhow, it doesnt change anything i have stated previously. if he has done something wrong i am sure he will right it. have faith and patience.
lex:
“The deadliest form of violence is poverty.” Ghandi
If you want some interesting reading on why this is true, Google "Understanding Mobility in America" by Tom Hertz. If you would like a picture of the US by 2050, Google "300 Million and Counting" by Garreau. It will enlighten you further on this recent discovery of yours concerning minorities in prison. It should also make you extremely aware some fundamental economic changes needed.

I answered the Ghandi quote below and the minority portion of it. Allow me to add some numbers to your general quotes. Louisiana State Attorney made reference to less than 1% of all murder convictions being innocent. SC Justice Scalia chimed in and stated the system is without flaw as a result of those findings. Well low and behold, Marquis used total felony convictions to make his point which is very different than the reality of murder convictions. Add to these convictions that ~85% of all convictions are plea bargained and the balance goes to trial. If you rework the numbers for murder convictions, you will find the innocence factor at ~8%.

If you have the time to read the citings I have listed, I think you will begin to understand the newspaper's "duh!" enlightenment which has been going on since WWII. There are dozens of studies on this and also why the death penalty does not work. The fools are finally beginning to understand that jailing and imprisoning people "ain't-working!" Crime and violence are symptomatic of other issues, a large part of which goes back to poverty.

Again, we did try to switch attorneys but the alleged attorney made it a point to get even. You do not have to believe me and I will show you the affidavit signed by him, the Ginther motion, and introduce you to a series of other attorneys who know what happened. You are aware that a recent trial was overturned by the Michigan COA for lack of preparation by this attorney? You did sidestep the question.
Thanks to Ron

Ann Arbor, MI

#94 Jun 23, 2008
I'm still here. Still trying to figure out where to go next.
gweedy

Swartz Creek, MI

#95 Oct 22, 2008
on Nov.4,2008 mr plunkett has a date with the court of appeals to see if the 2 charges were dropped before will be reinstated.God works in mysterious ways.Anymore comments from brandy should be taken into consideration that her and plunkett were buddies in his out of control days.Get what i mean?wink,wink
US Citizen

Las Vegas, NV

#96 Nov 9, 2008
Crack can AND does overcome the best of anyone...it makes them do things they would never otherwise do...however...this man is guilty of negligent homicide and should receive the normal two to fifteen year prison sentence like any other person would receive.

Thousands of people in Michigan are currently in prison for breaking this very law...and this man should not receive special treatment just because he was a lawyer..however..he probably will..and its sickening...We have two sets of laws in America..one for the "special" people..and one for the poor people. That in itself is a crime...

The fact is...he KNEW that dabbling in these deadly drugs might cause a death..and thats all that is required to be able to charge some one with Neglient Homicide.

And in Michigan FEW people get probation for negligent homicide...so lets see what happens here. While we ARE seeing an increase in real justice no matter WHO you are...Michigan DOES have a tendency to "coddle" its own. They have done so in the past in some alarming cases...

Lets see what happens in this case...

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